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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Victoria Knight

This article presents the key findings of an investigation into minority ethnic prisoners' knowledge and perceptions of the Probation and Prison Services in the east of…

Abstract

This article presents the key findings of an investigation into minority ethnic prisoners' knowledge and perceptions of the Probation and Prison Services in the east of England. The first part of the article puts this study into disciplinary context by examining relevant and topical research and debate about minority ethnic service users' experiences and treatment within the criminal justice system. Most notably perceptions and opinions of minority ethnic service users are limited. However accounts of discrimination and racism within elements of the criminal justice system provide a useful springboard to understand and collect much awaited data in this area. The final part of the article summarises the key findings of this investigation and goes on to make useful recommendations to the service providers in terms of developing and establishing effective race relations in the shape of policy development, consequent action and for further investigative studies of this nature.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Alastair Roy, Jane Fountain and Sundari Anitha

This paper examines the social and institutional context of barriers to drug service throughcare and aftercare for prisoners in England and Wales, including those that…

Abstract

This paper examines the social and institutional context of barriers to drug service throughcare and aftercare for prisoners in England and Wales, including those that specifically affect Black and minority ethnic prisoners. A research project in 2004 reviewed relevant literature and statistical data, mapped prison drug services, and sought the perspectives of relevant stakeholders: in total, 334 individuals were recruited to the study. The methodology facilitates analysis of the structure of services and the agency prisoner in accessing them. Recommendations are made for changes to the structure and delivery of prison drug services.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

Farrukh Alam, Nat Wright, Paul Roberts, Sunny Dhadley, Joanne Townley and Russell Webster

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current provision of opioid substitution therapy (OST) during and immediately following release from detention in prisons in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current provision of opioid substitution therapy (OST) during and immediately following release from detention in prisons in England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of experts was convened to comment on current practices and to make recommendations for improving OST management in prison. Current practices were previously assessed using an online survey and a focus group with experience of OST in prison (Webster, 2017).

Findings

Disruption to the management of addiction and reduced treatment choice for OST adversely influences adequate provision of OST in prison. A key concern was the routine diversion of opiate substitutes to other prisoners. The new controlled drug formulations were considered a positive development to ensure streamlined and efficient OST administration. The following patient populations were identified as having concerns beyond their opioid use, and therefore require additional considerations in prison: older people with comorbidities and complex treatment needs; women who have experienced trauma and have childcare issues; and those with existing mental health needs requiring effective understanding and treatment in prison.

Originality/value

Integration of clinical and psychosocial services would enable a joint care plan to be tailored for each individual with opioid dependence and include options for detoxification or maintenance treatment. This would better enable those struggling with opioid use to make informed choices concerning their care during incarceration and for the period immediately following their release. Improvements in coordination of OST would facilitate inclusion of strategies to further streamline this process for the benefit of prisoners and prison staff.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2012

Michael Brookes, Martin Glynn and David Wilson

This article is concerned with exploring the experience of black prisoners at HMP Grendon, the only prison in the country that operates wholly as a therapeutic community (TC).

Abstract

Purpose

This article is concerned with exploring the experience of black prisoners at HMP Grendon, the only prison in the country that operates wholly as a therapeutic community (TC).

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved undertaking semi‐structured interviews with 11 prisoners, all identifying themselves as “black”, who had committed a range of offences, as well as representing several geographical locations from the UK, Africa and the Caribbean. An adapted form of grounded theory was used to code the data collected from these interviews.

Findings

In total, four main themes emerged from the interviews undertaken: Grendon; Father deficit; Self‐concept; and Desistance.

Research limitations/implications

Grendon may be the recipient of a culture of mistrust amongst black prisoners within the wider prison estate. Consequently, black prisoners' narratives could provide some much needed clarity on black prisoners operating from an “outsider within” perspective in the predominantly white TCs at Grendon.

Practical implications

The research suggested that elements of the prison's TC regime may not be culturally appropriate, appealing, or marketed correctly to black prisoners. This may be compounded by the social stigma attached to black men's mental health, combined with their overrepresentation within both the criminal justice and mental health systems.

Originality/value

While there is a developing body of knowledge of how prison TCs offer space for offenders to reflect, address, and then transform their offending behaviour, to date there has been limited consideration of the nature of the TC experience for black TC residents in the prison system of England and Wales. This article addresses this deficit.

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Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Paul Illingworth

Discrimination takes the form of continuing segregation and exclusion in society. Prison staffs are actively encouraged to be anti‐discriminatory. Offenders are one group…

Abstract

Discrimination takes the form of continuing segregation and exclusion in society. Prison staffs are actively encouraged to be anti‐discriminatory. Offenders are one group discriminated against by society; estimates have been as high as 90% of offenders also having mental health problems. People with mental illness are also discriminated against, therefore offenders with mental illness are at greater risk of being discriminated against. This article explores how quality assurance models could be used as a means of improving anti‐discriminatory practice in prison settings.

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Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ralf Jürgens

Since the early 1990s, various countries have introduced HIV prevention programmes in prisons. Such programmes include education on HIV/AIDS, HCV and on drug use for…

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, various countries have introduced HIV prevention programmes in prisons. Such programmes include education on HIV/AIDS, HCV and on drug use for prisoners and for staff, voluntary testing and counselling, the distribution of condoms, bleach, and needles and syringes, and substitution therapy for injecting drug users. Other forms of drug‐dependence treatment, as well as drug demand reduction and drug supply reduction measures may also be relevant to managing HIV/AIDS and HCV in prisons, and may facilitate HIV prevention measures ‐ or have unintended negative consequences for such measures. Prison systems in a growing number of countries are implementing such programmes. However, many of them are small in scale and restricted to a few prisons. Provision of care and treatment for people living with HIV or AIDS has become a priority worldwide, and it is considered to be a basic human right. This includes the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ARV) in the context of comprehensive HIV/AIDS care. Providing access to ARV for those in need in the context of correctional facilities is a challenge, but it is necessary and feasible. Studies have documented that, when provided with care and access to medications, prisoners respond well to ARV. Part 3 of the select annotated bibliography on HIV/AIDS and HCV in prisons contains selected “essential” articles and reports that provide information about (1) substitution treatment and other forms of drug‐dependence treatment; (2) other drug demand and drug supply reduction measures; and (3) care, treatment, and support for prisoners living with HIVor AIDS and/or HCV. Each section also contains a brief review of the evidence, based on recent work undertaken by the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Martin Caraher, Paul Dixon, Roy Carr‐Hill, Paul Hayton, Hilary McGough and Lisa Bird

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against…

Abstract

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against which future activity might be measured. Finds that health promotion is under‐resourced and the concept and practice poorly understood. Health needs assessment tended to be analysis of and for health‐care services and, except in a minority of cases, did not include consultation with staff, prisoners or their families. Where responsibility was shared and the work based on multi‐disciplinary approaches, it seems more likely to have been reported accurately as health promotion activity. The official policy of a healthy settings/whole prison approach was not understood by many and its application was limited. The findings have informed the development of a new health promotion strategy for the prison service in England and Wales.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Louise Griffiths and Di Bailey

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the current evidence for peer support in prisons, in particular its contribution to working with prisoners who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the current evidence for peer support in prisons, in particular its contribution to working with prisoners who self-injure and the extent to which the success of peer support schemes such as the prison listeners, hinges upon staff’s willingness to engage with the initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The review was constructed by using primary and secondary terms to search the literature. The studies focused on peer support in custody with reference to mental health and self-injury. Searches identified papers on the prison listener scheme and staff perspectives on prison peer support, as these formed a central focus of the review. Studies were excluded from the review if the participants’ behaviours was explicitly linked to suicidal intent, as the review focused on self-injury as a coping strategy.

Findings

A total of 23 studies were selected according to specific inclusion criteria (six were grey literature, 17 academic literature). Of the 23 studies ten studies focused on peer support and self-injury. Of the 23 studies the listener scheme was the focus of 15 studies, of these 15 studies self-injury and the listener scheme was a focus of eight studies.

Originality/value

Evidence from the review suggests that prison peer support could be considered on a continuum depending on the different degrees of peer involvement.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Shona Hunter and Elaine Swan

The paper has two purposes: to introduce a new perspective on power and resistance in equalities work; and to trouble either or theorisations of success and failure in…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper has two purposes: to introduce a new perspective on power and resistance in equalities work; and to trouble either or theorisations of success and failure in this work. Instead it offers a new means of exploring micro‐practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies/develops an “actor network theory” (ANT) analysis to a single case study of Iopia, a Black woman equalities practitioner working in a prison education context. It uses this to explore the ways in which Iopia interacts with a variety of human and non‐human objects to challenge racism in this context.

Findings

Iopia, from an initial position of marginality (as a Black woman experiencing racism) is able to establish herself (by virtue of this same identity as a Black woman combating racism) as central to a “new” network for equality and diversity. This new network both challenges and sustains narrow exclusionary definitions of diversity. Thus, Iopia's case provides an example of the contradictions, and paradox, experienced by those working for equality and diversity.

Research limitations/implications

In the future, this type of feminist ANT analysis could be more fully developed and integrated with critical race and other critical cultural theories as these relate to equalities work.

Practical implications

The approach, and, in particular, the notion of translation, can be used by practitioners in thinking through the ways in which they can use material objects to draw in multiple “others” into their own networks.

Originality/value

The article is one of the first to explore equalities workers via the lens of ANT. It is unique in its analysis of the material objects constituting both diversity workers and diversity work and thus its analysis of diversity workers and their work as part of a complex set of social and “material” relations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Axel Klein

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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