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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Jung-Hwan Kim, Minjeong Kim, Minjung Park and Jungmin Yoo

The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of interactivity and vividness on perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment and their consequent impacts on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of interactivity and vividness on perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment and their consequent impacts on consumer behavioral responses in a retail furniture VR store context. Considering the lack of VR empirical research, the indirect effect of interactivity and vividness on perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment through telepresence and the moderating effect of consumer previous experience with VR are also included.

Design/methodology/approach

A commercial IKEA VR store was chosen for the study. Head-mounted display (HMD) VR headsets were employed for the VR shopping experience. The study was conducted at a laboratory at a large university in the southeastern United States. A total of 146 college students participated in the study.

Findings

Vividness had significant positive effects on perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment, which in turn influenced attitude towards VR and behavioral intentions. Interactivity did not have positive impacts on perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment. However, it indirectly affected perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment through telepresence. The findings also proved the moderating effect of consumer previous VR experience between interactivity and perceived usefulness and between interactivity and perceived enjoyment. The relationship between attitude and behavioral intentions was also positive.

Originality/value

Notwithstanding the benefits of VR in relation to its utilitarian, hedonic, and behavioral values, little is known about consumers' responses towards the usage of VR as a shopping tool. The present study can be considered as a starting point in understanding the usefulness of VR from consumer and managerial perspectives. The findings of VR indicated in the study will help practitioners understand the urgency of adopting VR in a retail setting.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Jung-Hwan Kim, Minjeong Kim, Jungmin Yoo and Minjung Park

The purpose of the study is to investigate how mental imagery evoked from sensory in-store experience influences consumer anticipatory emotion, perceived ownership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate how mental imagery evoked from sensory in-store experience influences consumer anticipatory emotion, perceived ownership and decision satisfaction which eventually impact positive consumer responses such as behavioural intent. In this study, gender difference is proposed as a moderator to completely understand the role of mental imagery in the in-store decision-making process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a market research agency in South Korea, an online survey was employed to collect data. A total of 455 useable respondents (men = 224 and women = 231) largely living in the two most populous provinces in South Korea (i.e. Seoul and Gyeonggi provinces) completed the survey. A number of path analyses were conducted to test hypotheses.

Findings

The results of the study showed that mental imagery evoked from sensory product experience played a critical part in facilitating the consumer decision-making process by influencing anticipatory emotion and perceived ownership. The relationship among anticipatory emotion, perceived ownership, decision satisfaction and behavioural intent was significant except for the relationship between perceived ownership and behavioural intent. This study further indicated that the way mental imagery influences the in-store decision-making process differs between men and women.

Originality/value

The effect of mental imagery in a physical retail context is largely ignored. This study addressed the crucial role of mental imagery in a physical apparel retail setting and examined its impact on consumer decision-making processes. By exploring how to enhance consumers' in-store sensory shopping experiences through mental imagery to influence their positive shopping outcomes, this study offers vital insights into how retailers operating physical stores can successfully utilize their stores.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Minjeong Kim

Purpose – This chapter examines the roles of the Unification Church (UC) in reconstructing the discourse of the gendered desire of Filipina marriage migrants and their…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines the roles of the Unification Church (UC) in reconstructing the discourse of the gendered desire of Filipina marriage migrants and their Korean husbands, serving as an intermediary agency in the process of international marriage migration, and reinforcing heterosexual practices as part of a regime of normalization.

Methodology – The chapter is based on 1 year of ethnographic fieldwork that included a review of secondary sources, participant observation, and in-depth interviews with Filipinas and Korean men.

Findings – The chapter shows the ways in which the UC reinforces the dominant discourse of gendered desire that portrays marriage migrants as women who wish to migrate mainly to marry a man who can provide economic stability. Filipina migrants, however, infuse the cultural discourse of romantic love into their decisions about husbands and marriage migration. Lastly, as the UC delineates normative heterosexual practices based on its religious doctrines, the church becomes a “regime of normalization” for traditional patriarchal heteronormativity.

Social implications – The chapter contributes to the idea that gender and sexuality are socially constructed and constitutive of migration.

Originality/value of chapter – The chapter examines not only the matchmaking role of an intermediary agency that facilitates cross-border marriages but also the agency's role in re/constructing gendered desire. Further, the chapter contributes to an understudied area: the social process of reconstructing heteronormativity in a transnational context.

Details

Social Production and Reproduction at the Interface of Public and Private Spheres
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-875-5

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Jung‐Hwan Kim, Minjeong Kim and Jay Kandampully

This study aims to examine how buying environment characteristics, which are not directly associated with price or product information, are related to overall…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how buying environment characteristics, which are not directly associated with price or product information, are related to overall e‐satisfaction; and how e‐satisfaction and e‐loyalty are interrelated.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 366 female and male college students from three universities (East coast, Midwest and West coast) participated. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling via LISREL 8.0 were conducted.

Findings

The findings showed that, of the six dimensions of buying environment characteristics, convenience, web appearance and entertainment value had a direct effect on e‐satisfaction. In addition, the study found a significant positive relationship between e‐satisfaction and e‐loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizing the results is limited by the use of a convenience sample of college students. To generalize the findings, more diversified random samples across gender and age are suggested.

Practical implications

The research provides useful implications to online retailers concerning which attributes should be given closer attention to improve customer satisfaction and e‐loyalty.

Originality/value

The study provides useful, practical information to online retailers by showing how customer‐centered e‐service attributes have an impact on e‐satisfaction, which in turn influences consumer e‐loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Minjeong Kim, Jung‐Hwan Kim and Sharron J. Lennon

The purpose of this study is to examine whether service attributes available on women's apparel web sites differ from those available on men's apparel web sites in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether service attributes available on women's apparel web sites differ from those available on men's apparel web sites in relation to the nine dimensions of E‐A‐S‐QUAL (E‐S‐QUAL for apparel).

Design/methodology/approach

Using three separate sources, 97 women's and 97 men's apparel web sites were selected, which constituted a variety of apparel retail web sites that are a fair representation of available US retail apparel web sites. ANOVAs and chi‐square analysis were performed.

Findings

The results of content analysis suggest that differences exist between women's and men's apparel web sites in providing online services that improve e‐service quality in such a way that women's web sites provided more service attributes that improve e‐service quality than men's web sites.

Practical implications

The results of content analysis suggest that the distribution or availability of almost half the e‐service attributes analyzed significantly differed between women's and men's apparel web sites. For the further growth of men's apparel shopping via the internet, e‐retailers of men's apparel need to provide e‐services at a more sophisticated level.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable information to both men's and women's apparel e‐retailers to understand their current performance in delivering e‐service and areas for improvement.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Jungmin Yoo and Minjeong Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of product coordination and a model's face on consumer responses in terms of affective states, perceived amount of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of product coordination and a model's face on consumer responses in terms of affective states, perceived amount of information and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study was a 2 (product presentation: coordinated vs uncoordinated) × 2 (model's face: present vs absent) between‐subjects design. A convenience sample of 243 college students participated in a web experiment.

Findings

The results suggest that complementary apparel items should be coordinated together (e.g. pairing t‐shirt and pants together on a model) on the web sites to produce favorable consumers' shopping outcomes. However, contrary to prior research findings, consumers perceived more information when no model's face was present with the product than when an attractive model's face and body were shown together.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a convenience sample of college women. Thus, future research needs to include a more diverse group of e‐shoppers to enhance generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide useful insights that apparel e‐retailers can utilize to develop more effective e‐retailing web sites. Based on the findings, product coordination without a model's face is recommended for e‐retailers.

Originality/value

Overall the paper's findings provide empirical support for the Stimulus‐Organism‐Response (S‐O‐R) model and the ensemble effect.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Jung‐Hwan Kim, Minjeong Kim and Sharron J. Lennon

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of web site atmospherics such as music and product presentation on consumers' emotional, cognitive, and conative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of web site atmospherics such as music and product presentation on consumers' emotional, cognitive, and conative responses in online shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 272 female college students participated in a web experiment employing a 2 (Product presentation: flat vs model)×2 (Music: present vs absent) between‐subjects factorial design.

Findings

The findings of this study showed that: product presentation (model vs flat) had a significant effect on consumers' emotional responses; and there were positive relationships among consumers' emotional, cognitive, and conative responses. Unexpectedly, music had no effect on consumers' emotional responses.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizing the results of this study is limited by the use of a convenience sample of college women.

Practical implications

Online retailers need to pay more attention on developing effective online atmospherics that evoke positive shopping outcomes. Based on the findings, product presentation using a model as compared to flat is recommended for online apparel retailers.

Originality/value

The current study confirmed the stimulus‐organism‐response relationship by showing that product presentation (online stimuli) affected emotion and attitude towards the site (emotional/cognitive states) and consequently influences purchase intent (response). Thus, this study provides practical, useful information to web site designers and online retailers by indicating that how web site atmospherics lead to positive consumer shopping outcomes.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Minjeong Kim, Jung‐Hwan Kim and Sharron J. Lennon

Purpose – This paper aims first, to identify online service attributes that facilitate efficient and effective shopping, purchasing, and delivery based on the modified…

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims first, to identify online service attributes that facilitate efficient and effective shopping, purchasing, and delivery based on the modified E‐S‐QUAL scale and, second, to evaluate the extent to which current online retailers provide such service attributes as an objective measure of service performance. Design/methodology/approach – A content analysis of 111 women's apparel retail web sites was conducted to assess online retailers' performance in providing online service attributes. Findings – The overall extent to which current online retailers provide online service attributes appears to be low. Managerial implications are provided to help online retailers improve their service performance. Originality/value – This study provides an objective way to evaluate online retailers' service performance and thus complement existing online service quality research based on consumer perceptions and evaluation of online service quality. In addition, the coding guide developed in this study provides an easy and practical tool that can be used by online retailers for the self‐assessment of online service performance.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Jung‐Hwan Kim, Minjeong Kim and Sharron J. Lennon

The objectives of this study are to: evaluate the task relevance of information components of apparel retail web sites from consumer perspectives; assess the performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this study are to: evaluate the task relevance of information components of apparel retail web sites from consumer perspectives; assess the performance of extant apparel retail web sites in providing both high and low task‐relevant information components; and explore whether differences in performance exist across different types of internet retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology was used to assess the task relevance of apparel web site information components from the consumers' perspective and a content analysis of apparel retail web sites was conducted to assess the availability of information components from apparel retail web sites.

Findings

The study finds that availability of high and low task‐relevant information varied regardless of task‐relevance. For both high and low task‐relevant information components, catalog e‐tailers provided the most information, followed in order by multi‐channel retailers, store e‐tailers, and pure e‐tailers.

Originality/value

This study can assist web site designers in meeting the needs of consumers by providing comprehensive understanding of the role of task‐relevant information in relation to internet shoppers' perceptions of the web site. In addition, the coding guide developed in this study provides an easy and practical tool that can be used by internet retailers for the self‐assessment of web site service performance.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Jennifer M. Mower, Minjeong Kim and Michelle L. Childs

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external…

Abstract

Purpose

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external atmospheric variables, specifically window displays and landscaping (i.e., accessory vegetation), on customers’ responses towards an apparel boutique.

Design/methodology/approach

The Stimulus‐Organism‐Response (S‐O‐R) model proposed by Mehrabian and Russell provided the theoretical framework. Data were collected from students enrolled at an American university. Univariate analyses and simple regression analyses were used to evaluate the influence of two external variables (window display and landscaping) on consumer responses in terms of liking, mood, and patronage intentions.

Findings

Results indicated that window display and landscaping had no main effects on pleasure or arousal. However, the presence of window display and landscaping influenced respondents’ liking of the store exterior and patronage intentions. Additionally, consumers’ liking of the store exterior and mood positively influenced patronage intentions.

Practical implications

Store retailers, especially small apparel boutiques, would benefit from landscaping the external portion of their store and pay special attention to their window displays.

Originality/value

Turley and Milliman stressed the pressing need for further empirical research on external atmospheric variables because of lack of research on exterior atmospheric variables. This study focused on external atmospheric variables and their impact on shopper behaviors and thus adds to the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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