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Abstract

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Sustainability Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-481-3

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-481-3

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Hevina S. Dashwood

The purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation for the global influences and dynamics that have led major mining companies to adopt corporate social responsibility

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation for the global influences and dynamics that have led major mining companies to adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies, and frame them in terms of sustainable development. Bad reputations stemming from environmental disasters and social disharmony led mining multinationals to adopt CSR policies and improve their practices. Rationalist expectations about what is driving firm responses to external pressures are a necessary, but insufficient, explanation of how and why mining companies have sought to improve their reputations. Three elements are necessary to explain firm responses, including strategic adaptation to external pressures, learning processes associated with CSR, and internalization of sustainable development norms, understood as standards of appropriate behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a multidisciplinary theoretical framework for explaining the adoption of CSR policies and practices on the part of mining companies, and applies that framework to case studies of two major mining companies with global operations.

Findings

An account of learning processes and norms socialization as they relate to CSR provide a more comprehensive explanation of how and why mining companies adopt CSR policies. Incorporation of these elements provides a better explanation of why mining companies began to frame their CSR policies in terms of the global norm of sustainable development.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the theoretical understanding of how and why firms adapt to changing societal expectations about appropriate corporate behavior by integrating two sets of literatures; constructivism from international relations theory, and learning from organization theory.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2013

A.N. Sarkar

Purpose – To review the performance and growth of mining industry in India against current global vision and trend of the industrial growth internationally. Also, to…

Abstract

Purpose – To review the performance and growth of mining industry in India against current global vision and trend of the industrial growth internationally. Also, to evolve the strategic policy for evaluating Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programme initiatives taken by the Indian mining industry at large as well as the impacts thereof, with special reference to affected and most vulnerable mining belts in India.Design/methodology/approach – An attempt has been made in the chapter to have a holistic sectoral review of the overall performance of the mining industry in India for the past one decade, as well as its claimed impact on improvement of ecological quality and socio-economic growth in the mining belts. The chapter reviews the state of the impact of ‘CSR’ initiatives and programmes on environment as well as the mining community in terms of stakeholders’ involvement and protection of rights in developing socio-economic business equity. The chapter also critically analyses the policy dimensions – including mining industry's operational framework, which can attribute towards developing future strategy for sustainable development of the mining industry at large, through evolving a series of reform processes, adequately backed up by innovative CSR policy and programme initiatives, together with well-defined implementation, monitoring, evaluation strategies and standards.Findings – The mining industries in India have a huge potential for growth to support the other industries for which bulk of the raw materials are derived from this industrial segment. Several research and developmental studies conducted by different organisations spread across the globe have convincingly been able to link the prospect of industrial growth and long-term sustainability with the stakeholders’ participatory and proactive roles along with those of the industry for holistic and integrated socio-economic development of the mining areas. This has been possible through careful designing of the CSR programmes and initiatives by several mining companies in India (with varying degree of success and failures) with close monitoring and performance evaluation of the impact of the programmes in ecological, economical and sustainability terms against certain pre-designed standards. Such standards – as they are constantly evolving – should inter alia include ethical and transparency dimensions to ensure total involvement of the local community in the mining-affected areas. Proper compensation mechanisms and socio-economic growth of the mining community will not only improve productivity, but will also take care of ecological and economic safeguard of the mined coal blocks that are highly vulnerable to ecological degradation and economic exploitation. As for future strategy for sustainable industrial growth of the mining industry in India, there should be constant monitoring and evaluation of the various provisions of the various Acts related to mining, minerals, metals, energy, power, environment, etc. that are constantly under review and reforms processes with a view to guiding the future strategy. International co-operation in the mining sector will go a long way for sustainable growth and development of the mining industry in India for boosting the economic growth of the country.Research limitations/implications – Future research on the theme should focus on identification of replicable and sustainable model of CSR practices in the mining industry by developing illustrative business models on the basis of global experiences. Sustainability reporting and identification of better qualitative as well as quantitative parameters, tools and techniques to study the impact of CSR practices on the socio-economic growth of the affected mining community should be the focus of future research.Social implications – The findings (serving as messages) of this piece of research will certainly have an impact on society. This in turn, will, hopefully influence public attitudes, and by implications, it will also influence (corporate) social responsibility or environmental issues.Originality/value of the chapter – The chapter is innovative and, among other things, addresses some of recently reported burning issues affecting the interests of the mining industry on one hand, and the national economy of the affected countries on the other.

Details

International Business, Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-625-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2010

José G. Vargas-Hernández

Grass roots movements in relationships of cooperation and conflict between firms, communities, and government have an important role to stop a living city from…

Abstract

Grass roots movements in relationships of cooperation and conflict between firms, communities, and government have an important role to stop a living city from disappearing. This chapter describes and analyzes the implications of the collective action used by grass roots movements in the defense of an old mining town, Cerro de San Pedro, of being disappeared due to the pollution of fresh watersheds by the operations of a mining company and the effects on the living city of San Luis Potosì, in the center of Mèxico.

Details

NGOs and Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-296-9

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Jose Ventura and Cesar Sandro Saenz

The aim of the study is to propose a model for conducting socially responsible operations in the mining industry, thriving to reach and sustain world-class standards in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to propose a model for conducting socially responsible operations in the mining industry, thriving to reach and sustain world-class standards in regard to profitability and environmental sustainability. The model uses a framework built upon a set of best practices in social responsibility by some of the largest mining companies in Peru.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted emphasizes the scrutiny of best practices among 92 initiatives undertaken by 10 companies – 5 large and 5 mid-sized companies as measured by the ratio “amount of investment” – which contributed most to prevent social conflict escalation. Data set received input from in-depth interviews to managers in charge of social affairs as well as from interviews to social constituents – beneficiaries and local authorities. Content analysis supported data processing and analysis of results.

Findings

Main findings comprise the following: distinct schemes for managing social responsibility in dependence upon impact evaluation indicators were found, which help to organize three models for conducting mining operations: traditional mining, up-to-date mining, and sustainability-oriented mining; evidence of distinct pathways undergone by large- and mid-sized companies in their quest to up-scale their corporate social responsibility profile.

Originality/value

Overall results from this study suggest the feasibility to modeling the social responsibility of mining companies in accordance to three dimensions – social, economic, and environmental – that draw from the analysis of best practices undertaken by large- and mid-sized companies.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2022

Padma Charan Mishra, Rashmi Ranjan Panigrahi and Alaka Samantaray

This study aims to identify the impact of commercial issues (CIs), financial issues (FIs) and corporate affairs (CAs) on operational excellence (OE) of the mining industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the impact of commercial issues (CIs), financial issues (FIs) and corporate affairs (CAs) on operational excellence (OE) of the mining industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample of size 321 was collected from Indian mining executives with more than ten years of exposure to the mining field. Factors are identified and confirmed with the use of confirmatory factor analysis. The structural equation modeling technique was then applied to understand the unique as well as the complex relationships between FI, CI, CA and OE.

Findings

The results indicate that all three issues, CI, FI and CA, have an influence on OE in the Indian mining industry. Among the variables of the issues considered in this study, marketing products and size and quality of products (from CI); scale of economies (from FI); risk management (from CA); and transportation and machine operation (from OE) are the highest influencing variables.

Research limitations/implications

This study has its limitations in sampling, the timing of sample collection and their mode. The samples were collected from only massively deposited large mines.

Practical implications

Business managers of the mining industry will be more vigilant and aware of those indirect variables such as marketing products, size and quality of products, scale of economies and risk management, which can influence OE apart from major influencing variables such as transportation and machine operations and production scheduling.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study in the mining industry to evaluate the impact of these three issues on OE. The originality of this research lies in testing the CI, FI and CA of the mining industry with OE, which is completely new to this field.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

José G. Vargas‐Hernández

The aim of this paper is to analyze relationships of cooperation and conflict between a mining company and the involved communities, focusing on the presence of the mining

1093

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to analyze relationships of cooperation and conflict between a mining company and the involved communities, focusing on the presence of the mining company (MSX) in Cerro de San Pedro, Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on the co‐operation and conflict between firms, communities, new social movements and the role of government.

Findings

The presence of the mining company has caused a severe social conflict among the inhabitants of San Pedro, Soledad y San Luis, alerting all who are concerned with historic heritage, cultural and environmental issues. At the center of the controversy is the cheap and efficient technology. Federal and state laws were violated. It is quite evident that there was a lack of sensitivity of foreign mining companies toward the consequences of their activities upon the communities and environment. This case also shows the lack of negotiation between firms, communities, new social movements and governments. Information about externalities and future costs of company activities is crucial but more crucial is formulation and implementation of more sensitive policies to avoid damage to the environment, biodiversity and health of the population. Governmental institutions must be aware that their decisions may affect the quality of life of present and future generations for the sake of a small increment in economic growth and large increase in private benefits of a small group of investors. More informed citizens tend to be more active protestors, such as the case of the students in San Luis. Contact between informed individuals of diverse groups and organizations helps to exchange experiences and create public opinion in favor of mobilization. Community participation and involvement in decision‐making of community development planning is quite limited by the lack of critical information. This fact is critical when the local government cannot provide the right information because there are other interests affecting the process.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the lack of sensitivity of foreign mining companies towards local communities.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Samuel Famiyeh, Ebenezer Adaku, Laud Kissi-Mensah and Charles Teye Amoatey

Proper risk management is a critical requirement for the success of every project. This is, to a large extent, due to the role risk plays in determining project outcomes…

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Abstract

Purpose

Proper risk management is a critical requirement for the success of every project. This is, to a large extent, due to the role risk plays in determining project outcomes. The mining sector usually is linked with high environmental, social and economic risks. Hence, the process of systematic risk management applied to a single case study of a tailings re-mining project in Ghana holds the potential for invaluable insights on risk management in the mining sector. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Mining organization experts were asked to identify project risks, and 50 staff from the organization were invited to make subjective assessments of the probability of occurrence and consequences for each of 15 identified risks. From this assessment, a risk severity matrix was developed.

Findings

The findings show that the most severe risks for a tailings re-mining project include spillage caused by leakage from pipes; vandalism by illegal mining operators; late deliveries of mining materials; the effect of rainfall; and failure to gain project approval from the Environmental Protection Agency. Risk treatment options are suggested for these risks.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to only the risk issues associated with tailings re-mining projects.

Practical implications

Practically, this study highlights for mining companies and operators, the critical risks factors that militate against successful tailings re-mining projects.

Social implications

This study, essentially, reveals the threat of illegal mining operations to such an important project and hence the need for strong security to avoid such threats.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the debate on the risk factors that affect tailings re-mining, especially, from a developing country’s point of view.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Padma Charan Mishra and Manoj Kumar Mohanty

The purpose of this paper is to explore operation influencing factors of mining. To collect gaps of study and to form a thematic representation of principal influencing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore operation influencing factors of mining. To collect gaps of study and to form a thematic representation of principal influencing factors and their unique influencing factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles were collected from different sources from 1974 to 2019 consisting of research articles, technical papers, expert blogs, working papers and conference papers covering various disciplines from psychology, human resource, finance and economics to mining engineering. Mining operation influencing factors were noted down. Four massively deposed mines were visited to observe the sequence of mining process. The field experts were also consulted to identify factors influencing their respected industry. Gaps were observed while comparing with the reviewed articles and opinions of field experts. Finally, senior experts were consulted to identify unique factors from the final list prepared and a framework of seven thematic categories consisting of unique factors was formulated.

Findings

A total of 197 sub-factors were collected from literature review and 2 sub-factors from Indian Mining experts during field study. These 199 sub-factors were initially categorised as 48 factors and one more factor was collected from Indian field experts. Finally, these 49 factors were thematically represented as principal factors and termed as operation, marketing and management, human resource, finance, resource and utility, corporate affairs and corporate social responsibility and environment.

Research limitations/implications

This study can be very helpful in the direction of different qualitative and quantitative studies, as the factors and sub-factors groups are identified.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need to provide a holistic review for understanding and documenting principal factors, unique factors and sub-factors those influence mining operation, profitability or sustainability issues of mines.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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