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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Yangqin Weng, Mingzhi Li and Check-Teck Foo

This paper aims to analyze the rates of returns on education in China and in the process raises issues relevant to the management of China’s system of education. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the rates of returns on education in China and in the process raises issues relevant to the management of China’s system of education. In the ongoing great transformation period of China, the rising rates of returns on education may have been indicators reflecting China’s social progressiveness. However, very little research efforts have been devoted to the study of the impacts of such factors as geographical regions and genders, etc. The authors hope to fill these gaps in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) database is used for this study (University of North Carolina). The longitudinal nature of the data sets covering 1989, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2011 provides a good basis for comparative analyses. The theory is grounded upon the Mincer equations through which econometric estimates are then made.

Findings

Disparities in returns on education are found between genders and across geographical regions. The regression results show that the women’s returns on education are consistently higher than those of men. However, the scales of such gender differences differ between the rural and urban areas: smaller for rural area and larger, more significantly so for urban. Additionally, we have found that the rates of returns on education in China have risen significantly over these years, and these increases have been largely due to the effects of institutional reforms. The urban-rural gap in their degrees of market orientation has contributed to the differences in their rates of returns on education. The analyses also suggest that foreign direct investment inflows, international trade and the increasing competitiveness from private enterprises render human capital more valuable to urban businesses. In case of the rural areas, a lack of incentive system tends to have contributed to the lower rates of returns on education.

Originality/value

The authors have presented evidence on the trends in the rates of returns on education during China’s critical transition period. Analyses of the possible reasons behind the differential rates of returns are provided. These findings are helpful for the government to shape their policies towards education. For instance, the government should give more emphasis to vocational schooling due to their significantly higher rates of returns.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Li Huang, Qingyan Zheng, Xin Yin, Mingzhi Luo and Yang Yang

Some researchers have found that disasters may have a “blessing in disguise effect” that some disaster sites transformed into more popular tourism destinations; however…

Abstract

Purpose

Some researchers have found that disasters may have a “blessing in disguise effect” that some disaster sites transformed into more popular tourism destinations; however, no studies have analyzed the heterogeneity of the “blessing in disguise effect”. This paper aims to explore and determine the effect of cultural distance on international inbound tourist arrivals to a post-disaster tourist destination that could explain this heterogeneous phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a threshold regression model and a differences-in-differences (DID) approach to analyze 2000–2016 international tourist arrival data from 13 main origin countries to Sichuan Province before and after the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake in China.

Findings

The effect of cultural distance on post-disaster inbound arrivals from the various origin countries followed a non-linear U-shaped “double-edged sword” pattern rather than displaying a simple linear relationship. Most notably, the disaster appeared to have a more positive effect on arrivals from countries with larger cultural distances, while the effect on arrivals from countries with shorter cultural distances was negative.

Originality/value

This study found that cultural distance could explain the heterogeneous “blessing in disguise” phenomenon, and it had both positive and negative impacts on tourism destination recovery; that is, a definite “double-edged sword effect” of cultural distance was found, which could help destination marketing organizations and management departments to design appropriately targeted marketing for post-disaster tourism destination recovery.

研究目的

些研究人员发现, 灾难可能会产生“因祸得福效应”, 即一些灾难现场变成了更受欢迎的旅游目的地。然而, 目前还没有研究分析这种“因祸得福效应”的异质性。本研究旨在探讨文化距离对灾后旅游目的地的国际入境旅游流的影响, 从而解释这种异质性现象。

研究设计/方法

本文采用门槛回归模型和双重差分法(DID)分析了2008年汶川地震发生前后(2000–2016年)来自13个主要来源国到中国四川省旅游的国际入境旅游流数据。

结果

文化距离对灾后客源国的入境旅游人数的影响呈现非线性的U型“双刃剑”模式, 而不是简单的线性关系。最值得注意的是, 灾难似乎对来自文化距离较大的客源国的游客人数产生了更积极的影响, 而对来自文化距离较短的客源国的游客人数产生了消极的影响。

原创性/价值

本研究发现, 文化距离可以解释异质性的“因祸得福”现象, 文化距离对旅游目的地恢复既有积极影响, 也有消极影响, 即文化距离具有明确的“双刃剑效应”。这可以帮助旅游目的地的灾后恢复设计合理的、有针对性的营销策略和恢复政策。

Propósito

Algunos investigadores han encontrado que los desastres pueden tener la “bendición del efecto disfraz” de que algunos sitios de desastre se transformen en destinos turísticos más populares;Sin embargo, ningún estudio ha analizado la heterogeneidel “efecto de bendición disfrazado”.El objetivo de este estudio es explorar y determinar el efecto de la distancia cultural en los flujos turísticos internacionales hacia un destino turístico después del desastre, lo que podría explicar este fenómeno heterogéneo.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

se empleun modelo de regresión de umbral y un enfoque de diferencias en diferencias (DID) para analizar los datos de llegada de turistas internacionales de 2000–2016 de trece países de origen principal A la provincia de Sichuan antes y después del terremoto de Wenchuan de 2008 en China.

Conclusiones

el efecto de la distancia cultural en las llegde los diversos países de origen después del desastre siguió un patrón de “espada de doble filo” no lineal en forma de u, en lugar de mostrar una relación lineal simple.Más notablemente, el desastre pareció tener un efecto más positivo en las llegde países con distancias culturales más grandes, mientras que el efecto en las llegde países con distancias culturales más cortas fue negativo.

Originalidad/valor

este estudio encontró que la distancia cultural podría explicar el heterogéneo fenómeno de la “bendición disfrazada” y que tenía impactos tanto positivos como negativos en la recuperación de un destino turístico;Es decir, se encontró un “efecto de doble filo” de la distancia cultural, que podría ayudar a las organizaciones de comercialización de destinos turísticos y a los departamentos de administración a diseñar estrategias de comercialización dirigidas adecuadamente para la recuperación de destinos turísticos después del desastre.

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Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Mingzhi Li and Kai Reimers

This paper aims to identify the sources of innovation in the current business environment of China. With the set target of transforming China into an innovative society by…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the sources of innovation in the current business environment of China. With the set target of transforming China into an innovative society by 2020, the Chinese government has taken dramatic measures to foster the nation’s innovation capability. Whether this Chinese model of promoting innovation has been successful and can be sustainable are controversial issues which need to be analyzed from an academic perspective. In recent years, there have been successful cases of innovation driven by grassroots entrepreneurs, especially in the information and communications technology (ICT) industry. Therefore, it is time to analyze their success factors from the perspectives of both corporate strategy and government policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this research is a comparative case analysis, and several high-profile cases in China’s ICT industry have been selected for this comparative study. Information used in the analysis comes from publicly available sources such as business school case studies and industry and news media reports. The authors have been following the evolution of China’s ICT industry for more than a decade; insights from their prior research and knowledge gained through industry contacts are also used in the analysis.

Findings

Generally speaking, the types of innovation in China’s ICT industry can be categorized into a top-down or a bottom-up approach. For the top-down approach of innovation driven by the government, the authors analyzed the case of the Chinese government’s effort to build an industry value chain through fostering the Chinese indigenous third-generation mobile communications standard time division–synchronous code division multiple access. In comparison, the authors use several success cases, including the ecosystem built around the highly successful XiaoMi mobile phone and Tencent’s mobile portal WeChat, as it showcases of the bottom-up approach of innovation driven by grassroots entrepreneurship. The comparison of these two approaches suggests that massive government-sponsored projects are unlikely to generate genuine innovation in the highly competitive and dynamic ICT sector. The government’s role should be to foster entrepreneurship and to create a fair business environment.

Originality/value

This research uses the method of comparative case studies to identify the source of innovation in a highly dynamic and uncertain business environment. Findings of this study shed light on the government policy toward innovation in the ICT industry and on the business firms’ strategy on innovation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Mingzhi Li and Kai Reimers

This paper reflects on the evolution of China's drug distribution industry from the planned economy era to the most recent dramatic shift, with a major focus on the…

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769

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on the evolution of China's drug distribution industry from the planned economy era to the most recent dramatic shift, with a major focus on the analysis of the government's efforts of centralizing the drug distribution channel through adoption of e‐bidding platforms. In a broader sense, the Chinese government's effort is a showcase of the so‐called “Chinese model” of implementing institutional change: the government initiates a project and counts on its fiat to gain compliance and support from the involved stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the limitations and problems of this mode of implementing institutional change.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical framework draws upon Williamson's theory of the mechanism of governance and insights from new institutional economics on institutional changes. The information used in this study is based on the authors' more than 40 interviews with a variety of pharmaceutical industry stakeholders, including government agencies, hospitals, pharmaceutical manufacturers, distributors, and electronic bidding platforms providers.

Findings

The failure of implementing third party electronic platforms based drug procurement practices shows the importance of aligning the mode of governing transactions with the macro level institutional environment and the micro level individual behavioral traits, and the government's decision of taking over the ownership of transaction platforms has further corroborated this logic.

Originality/value

This paper is an effort to analyze the logic behind the Chinese model of implementing institutional change: the government initiates a project and counts on its fiat to gain compliance and support from the involved stakeholders. From the academic perspective, this paper contributes to literature on the analysis of the interaction of technology adoption and institutional change.

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Xianming Wu, Nathaniel C. Lupton and Yuping Du

The purpose of this paper is to investigates how organizational learning, absorptive capacity, cultural integration, specialization of the acquired firm and…

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1135

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigates how organizational learning, absorptive capacity, cultural integration, specialization of the acquired firm and characteristics of transferred knowledge impact innovation performance subsequent to overseas acquisitions.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from 222 Chinese multinational enterprises engaged in overseas acquisitions.

Findings

Differences between acquiring and acquired firms’ capabilities, while having a positive direct influence, suppress the positive impact of organizational learning and absorptive capacity, suggesting that multinationals require some basic level of capabilities to appropriate value from overseas acquisitions.

Research limitations/implications

This paper investigates the impact of knowledge-seeking overseas acquisition of Chinese multinationals on innovation performance, as this appears to be the primary motive for making such acquisitions.

Practical implications

Knowledge-seeking overseas acquisition should be based upon the absorptive capacity of the acquiring firm and complementarity between both firms. In knowledge-seeking overseas acquisitions, establishing an effective organizational learning mechanism is necessary for improving innovation performance.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the behaviour and innovation performance of Chinese multinationals through analysis of primary data.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Weibao Li, Weiwei Wu, Bo Yu and Check-Teck Foo

This paper aims to argue for a China transmuting to fast overtake USA in innovation based on the extrapolation of past statistical trend. Case studies in self and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue for a China transmuting to fast overtake USA in innovation based on the extrapolation of past statistical trend. Case studies in self and co-innovation are provided so that the documentation of the dynamics of knowledge flows and a brain-linguistic explanation is given as to why, in the future, the Chinese are likely to lead in innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper illustrates a multi-method approach in research for Chinese Management Studies. First, the sociological background of China is highlighted (Mao Zedong’s aphorism). Second, insights from OECD patent database are utilized. Third, the use of comparative research and development case-studies: self-innovation (Chinese) and co-innovation (contrasting Japanese versus French cooperation with Chinese). Fourth, is the inter-disciplinarily approach wherein the assimilating of knowledge is related to recent advances in brain research. Fifth, emphasizing the different levels in organizing for innovation: national (China), organizational (SOE), group processes and person-to-person, synapses within individual brains.

Findings

Statistical trend suggests that China is transforming and is on the path toward overtaking the USA in innovation. When will this happen? Using extrapolation as an indication, China may surpass the USA by the 50 per cent mark within the next decade. Insights into the processes of self-innovation and co-innovation are provided. Authors argue for a brain-linguistic explanation (Hebb, 1949) for further understanding why China will eventually lead ceteris paribus innovation, a function of the human brain.

Originality/value

This paper highlights on the basis of statistical trends (using OECD database) a rising, innovative China that is poised to overtake the USA in the near future. A major contribution is in providing insights of interactional processes required to foster innovation: self and co-innovation (comparing Japanese and French). The critical brain-linguistic role as the rationale as to why the Chinese are given a greater, more developed brain power that will eventually surpass the West in innovation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Zhi-hong Song

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among organizational learning, absorptive capacity, imitation and innovation in the Chinese context.

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1654

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among organizational learning, absorptive capacity, imitation and innovation in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the organizational learning theory and innovation theory, the paper presents a framework linking organizational learning, absorptive capacity, imitation and innovation. Using a key informant technique, a survey questionnaire was designed and sent to the middle or top management managers of 115 firms located in Peking, People’s Republic (PR) of China. Structural equation modeling (SEM) with the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation procedures was applied to test the hypotheses developed in the research.

Findings

The empirical results show that both organizational learning and absorptive capacity have positive impacts on innovation; imitation has a positive impact on absorptive capacity; absorptive capacity mediates the relationship between imitation and innovation.

Practical implications

This study has implications for firms aiming to enhance innovation by organizational learning, absorptive capacity and imitation.

Originality/value

Despite the number of studies concerning organizational learning, absorptive capacity, imitation and innovation, research that encompasses the interrelationships between the four concepts simultaneously remains scarce. The paper provides a framework linking organizational learning, imitation, absorptive capacity and innovation, and it advances the argument that absorptive capacity is an important factor in predicting the Chinese firms’ transition from imitation to innovation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Jiuchang Wei and Yang Liu

– This paper aims to examine the effect of government support on the innovation performance of firms in the Chinese context.

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1907

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of government support on the innovation performance of firms in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

We divided government support into vertical support and horizontal support, and adopted an empirical research approach in this study. We collected the data of 343 enterprises in China that had been identified as innovative enterprises, including their characteristic data, government support data and patent data. Negative binomial regression was used to quantitatively examine the relationship between government support and the innovation performance of firms.

Findings

Both vertical support in the form of direct research and development (R&D) subsidies and horizontal support in the form of regional innovation policy positively influence the innovation performance of firms. In addition, direct R&D subsidies are more likely to experience the enhanced benefits of carrying out tax credit policy on the innovation performance of firms.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the innovation literature by distinguishing two types of government support, namely, vertical support and horizontal support, and assessing the effects of government support on firm innovation in the Chinese context.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Daniel C W Ng and Kris Law

This paper aims to present an empirical study on how informal networks affect innovation performance of firms in Shanghai. This study is a preliminary attempt to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an empirical study on how informal networks affect innovation performance of firms in Shanghai. This study is a preliminary attempt to understand the effect of informal networks on innovation performance. Shanghai is selected as the region for data acquisition due to a prominent economic role in China. It is specifically to answer the research question regarding the impact of Chinese informal social network on innovation performance (in Shanghai).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper attempts to explore the quantitative effect of informal networks on innovation performance in regard to group behavioural characteristics among executives in China.

Findings

A total of 1,000 executives were invited, and there were 315 valid samples returned. Significant correlations are noted in key network variables against innovation performance. The results and findings generally support the hypotheses that “Education”, “Business Referral” and “Experience” are three core constructs exerting substantial influence in innovation performance. However, it is interesting to note that the connectivity and size of informal networks do not matter. Informal networks show no significant influence on innovation performance.

Practical implications

This indicates stereotypes in Shanghai social business networks prioritizing on highly educated acquaintances, referral activities and working experiences.

Originality/value

This study explores uncovered territory in organization innovation regarding the infiltration of informal networks, particularly in Chinese communities. Though the research context is Shanghai, the effect of informal networks on innovation performance can be extrapolated to other Chinese societies, such as Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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