Search results

1 – 10 of 10
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Muhammad Irfan, Mingzheng Wang and Naeem Akhtar

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the underlying mechanism through which firms can achieve supply chain agility and augment business performance from the vendor’s…

Downloads
1273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the underlying mechanism through which firms can achieve supply chain agility and augment business performance from the vendor’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on dynamic capability view and contingency theory, the study conceptualizes a moderated mediation model to investigate the underlying influence of process integration (PI), supply flexibility and product-related complexity on supply chain agility and the subsequent effect of supply chain agility on firm’s business performance. Survey data from a sample of 148 firms, in the garment manufacturing industry, in Pakistan were analyzed using partial least square methods.

Findings

The results revealed that supply flexibility (i.e. volume and mix) mediates the effect of PI on supply chain agility. Supply chain agility, in turn, influences a firm’s business performance. Furthermore, the competence‒capability framework is not consistent across the varying degrees of product complexity such as product complexity hinders the effect of supply flexibility on supply chain agility, whereas it amplifies the impact of PI on supply chain agility. The conditional indirect effects suggest that the indirect effect of PI on supply chain agility through supply flexibility becomes stronger when product complexity is high.

Originality/value

The study is novel in the context of an emerging economy to educate fashion vendors to tune their competencies and capabilities to regain the market share in the global market place.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Muhammad Irfan and Mingzheng Wang

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of data-driven capabilities on supply chain integration (SCI) and competitive performance of firms in the food and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of data-driven capabilities on supply chain integration (SCI) and competitive performance of firms in the food and beverages (F & B) industry in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt the structural equation modeling approach to test the proposed hypotheses using AMOS 23. Survey data were collected from 240 firms in the F & B industry in Pakistan.

Findings

The results revealed that SCI (i.e. internal integration (II) and external integration (EI)) significantly mediates the effect of data-driven capabilities (i.e. flexible information technology resources and data assimilation) on a firm’s competitive performance. In addition to the direct effects, II also has an indirect effect on competitive performance through EI.

Practical implications

The study has several implications for managers in the context of big data application in food supply chain management (FSCM) in a developing country context. The study posits that firms can achieve excellence in performance by governing data-driven supply chain operations. The study also has implications for distributors and importers in the F & B industry. The cloud-based sharing of data can improve the operational performance of channel members while reducing their overall cost of operations. In practice, food franchises largely get the advantage of shared resources of their suppliers in managing orders, payments, inventory and after-sales services.

Originality/value

The study is novel and deepens the understanding about the use of big data in FSCM keeping in view the industry trends and stakeholder’s priorities in a developing country context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Muhammad Irfan, Mingzheng Wang, Abaid Ullah Zafar, Mohsin Shahzad and Tahir Islam

This study aims to investigate the hierarchical relationship between industry-specific attributes of supply chain (SC) strategies and information technology (IT) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the hierarchical relationship between industry-specific attributes of supply chain (SC) strategies and information technology (IT) to improve the performance of firms in textile industry in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a mix of enablers through literature review and experts’ opinions. Next, the driving and dependence powers of enablers were identified, using the interpretive structural modeling (ISM) approach.

Findings

The ISM model suggests eight levels, with customer satisfaction at the top of the model. Process automation and TQM are placed at second and third level, respectively, whereas flexible sourcing and flexible capacity are positioned at fourth level. The key enablers of IT have high driving power, hence positioned at the bottom of ISM model.

Originality/value

This study has value for firms in garment manufacturing and exporting industry to invest into IT and sustainable SC design for competitive performance. The theoretical and managerial implications are provided.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Mingzheng Wu, Xiaoling Sun, Delin Zhang and Ci Wang

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB…

Downloads
1025

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB) of Chinese public servants. In this model, the authors assumed that job burnout mediates the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB and that moral identity moderates the relationship between job burnout and CWB.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 210 public servants in China participated in this study, and their characteristics were measured by self-report tools. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to test the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Analysis of the data demonstrated that perceived organizational justice, job burnout and moral identity influenced CWB. Moral identity moderated the relationship between job burnout and CWB, such that individuals with low moral identity are more likely to engage in CWB. Moreover, job burnout mediated the effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB, and the mediating effect of job burnout was moderated by moral identity. The indirect effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB through job burnout was significant among individuals with low moral identity but not among individuals with high moral identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the self-regulatory function of moral identity in preventing CWB.

Practical implications

The study offers several significant suggestions to reduce CWB in Chinese public sector administration, such as by improving organizational justice perception, recruiting and selecting individuals with reference to their moral identity and monitoring employees’ job burnout regularly.

Originality/value

The authors developed and verified a moderated mediated model on the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB. The study revealed that job burnout has a mediating effect on the perceived organizational justice–CWB relation, providing important insights into the processes through which perceived organizational justice affects CWB.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Xiaozhu Liu, Yinfeng Li, Hubing Zhao, Zhihai Yu, William James Hardie and Mingzheng Huang

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the fermentative properties of a strain of indigenous Wickerhamomyces anomalus (W. anomalus) from Rosa roxburghii

Downloads
232

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the fermentative properties of a strain of indigenous Wickerhamomyces anomalus (W. anomalus) from Rosa roxburghii Tratt (R. roxburghii).

Design/methodology/approach

Morphological and molecular methods were used to determine the species of the selected strain W. anomalus C11. The physiological tolerances to glucose, ethanol, citric acid and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were further assessed by checking the growth of cells, and the oenological performances were proved to measure the related fermentative properties of R. roxburghii wines.

Findings

The W. anomalus C11 strain could be grown faster than commercial S. cerevisiae X16 in its logarithmic growth period and had preferable tolerances to glucose, ethanol, citric acid and SO2. Moreover, this strain of native R. roxburghii yeast W. anomalus C11 produced less sulphuretted hydrogen and had a higher β-glucosidase activity. Furthermore, W. anomalus C11 could reduce the volatile acids, reduce the sourness and enhance volatile aroma richness and complexity of R. roxburghii wines including types of aroma and content thereof. Taken together, the R. roxburghii native yeast W. anomalus C11 may have potential for use in R. roxburghii winemaking.

Originality/value

(1) The fermentative properties of a strain of indigenous W. anomalus (named as C11) from R. roxburghii was evaluated. (2) The strain of W. anomalus C11 had preferable tolerances to glucose, ethanol, citric acid and SO2. (3) This strain of native R. roxburghii yeast W. anomalus C11 produced less sulphuretted hydrogen and had a higher ß-glucosidase activity. (4) W. anomalus C11 could reduce the volatile acids, reduce the sourness and enhance volatile aroma richness and complexity of R. roxburghii wines including types of aroma and content thereof.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Dirk De Clercq, Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Shakir Sardar and Subhan Shahid

This research unpacks the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their counterproductive work behaviour, by detailing a mediating role…

Abstract

Purpose

This research unpacks the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their counterproductive work behaviour, by detailing a mediating role of organizational identification and a moderating role of discretionary human resource (HR) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested with a sample of employees in Pakistan, collected over three, time-lagged waves.

Findings

An important reason that beliefs about unfair organizational treatment lead to enhanced counterproductive work behaviour is that employees identify less strongly with their employing organization. This mediating role of organizational identification is less salient, however, to the extent that employees can draw from high-quality, discretionary HR practices that promote their professional development and growth.

Practical implications

For management practitioners, this study pinpoints a key mechanism – the extent to which employees personally identify with their employer – by which beliefs about organizational favouritism can escalate into purposeful efforts to inflict harm on the organization and its members. It also reveals how this risk can be subdued by discretionary practices that actively support employees' careers.

Originality/value

This study adds to previous research by detailing why and when employees' frustrations about favouritism-based organizational decision making may backfire and elicit deviant responses that likely compromise their own organizational standing.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Sadia Jahanzeb, Dirk De Clercq and Tasneem Fatima

With a basis in social identity and equity theories, this study investigates the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their…

Abstract

Purpose

With a basis in social identity and equity theories, this study investigates the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their knowledge hiding, along with the mediating role of organizational dis-identification and the potential moderating role of benevolence.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested with three-wave survey data collected from employees in Pakistani organizations.

Findings

The experience of organizational injustice enhances knowledge hiding because employees psychologically disconnect from their organization. This mediation by organizational dis-identification is buffered by benevolence or tolerance for inequity, which reduces employees' likelihood of reacting negatively to the unfavourable experience of injustice.

Practical implications

For practitioners, this study identifies organizational dis-identification as a key mechanism through which employees' perceptions of organizational injustice spur their propensity to conceal knowledge, and it reveals how this process might be mitigated by a sense of obligation to contribute or “give” to organizational well-being.

Originality/value

This study establishes a more complete understanding of the connection between employees' perceptions of organizational injustice and their knowledge hiding, with particular attention devoted to hitherto unspecified factors that explain or influence this process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Feng Xu, Benhua Xu, Verl Anderson and Cam Caldwell

Humility as an important factor for leaders was identified by Collins (2001) and his colleagues in an extensive research project about the leadership qualities of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Humility as an important factor for leaders was identified by Collins (2001) and his colleagues in an extensive research project about the leadership qualities of the leaders of companies that transitioned from “good” to “great.” This paper is an empirical study of six factors closely associated with humility and leadership and the purpose of this paper is to identify how Chinese business students and Chinese employees perceive the importance of six factors associated with humility as enlightened leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper summarizes recent research about humility and leadership and suggests seven hypotheses about the importance of six factors associated with humility as enlightened leadership.

Findings

This study confirms that Chinese respondents affirmed the value of all six factors and identified the statistical significance of three of the factors studied.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that it is exploratory in nature and contained many factors that made conducting factor analysis indeterminable. The practical implications of this study are that it provides confirming information about understanding the value system and priorities of Chinese employees and future workers when multi-national companies interact with Chinese partners.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable information about the six factors associated with humility as enlightened leadership. This study is the first of its kind that empirically tests Chinese attitudes associated with humility and leadership.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Eka Pariyanti, Andiana Rosid and Wiwiek Rabiatul Adawiyah

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not Islamic Workplace Spirituality (IWS) acts as a moderator in the relationship between Organizational Justice (OJ)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not Islamic Workplace Spirituality (IWS) acts as a moderator in the relationship between Organizational Justice (OJ), Job Satisfaction (JS) and Workplace Deviant Behavior (WDB).

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted at Islamic-based universities in Lampung, with 213 employees as respondents out of 456 population’s members. The sampling technique used was purposive sampling, and the data were collected directly from respondents using a self-administered questionnaire. The analysis method used to test the research hypothesis was moderated regression analysis (MRA).

Findings

Out of six hypotheses proposed all were supported. This study confirmed the moderating role of Islamic Workplace Spirituality on the relationship of organizational justice and job satisfaction with workplace deviant behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations on the self-report measures used, which may lead to general error bias. Also, because of the cross-sectional nature of data collection in this study, it can impact the inaccurate delineation of causal conclusions between the constructs examined (Clugston, 2000). Further research is suggested to conduct longitudinal research. This research was conducted in Lampung and is limited to religion-based agencies, limiting the generalizability of some findings in different places. Future studies are suggested to examine this construct in a broader scope. Generalizability problems were observed because people's responses to the questionnaires were so evident that they did not give importance to the research work, and they thought it was a waste of time to respond.

Practical implications

Since bearing the label “Islamic Higher Education” identifies them as part of Islamic education, all institutions that bear that label must follow Islamic law rulings in all of their operational activities. Islamic Spirituality in the Workplace (IWS) will make employees in organizations work on time and even manage their workload correctly. Having values related to spiritual constructs will make employees more ethical in understanding values and behavior, also increase trust among workers.

Social implications

ISW will make employees in organizations/agencies work on time and even manage their workload correctly. Management must understand that an organization needs to create a healthy environment by providing organizational justice and reducing people's deviant behavior in the organization. Positive individual behavior shall increase the quality of one's social life.

Originality/value

Most theories in human resources development in higher education came from the field of psychology while religious perspectives tend to be omitted. This study underlines some of the crucial advances and contributions in developing human resource management theory related to Islamic workplace spirituality as a strategy to mitigate employees' deviant behavior.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Omar Durrah and Monica Chaudhary

This study examines the effect of three negative behaviors namely alienation behavior, cynicism behavior and silence behavior on employees’ intention to leave work in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of three negative behaviors namely alienation behavior, cynicism behavior and silence behavior on employees’ intention to leave work in the telecommunication sector in the Sultanate of Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a simple random sampling technique, data was collected using a questionnaire from 204 employees working in two leading telecommunication service providing agencies (Omantel and Ooredoo) in Oman. The collected data was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) through AMOS software.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate a significant effect of both cynicism behavior and work alienation behavior on employees’ intention to leave work while silence behavior did not appear to affect employees’ intention to leave work.

Practical implications

The research suggests that the policymakers are required to take corrective measures and implement policies and work practices that ensure employees’ sincere engagement to work.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the knowledge regarding the effect of employees’ negative behavior on the intention to leave work. The work is novel in the context of studying the effect in the Sultanate of Oman.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10