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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Tao Wang, Xiaowei Liu, Minghui Kang and Haichao Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to examine factors affecting fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure on crowdfunding platforms based on risk-perception theory (RPT).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine factors affecting fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure on crowdfunding platforms based on risk-perception theory (RPT).

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was employed to test the hypothesized relationships using data collected from China.

Findings

The authors found that plagiarism risk and financing risk are two important variables that influence fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure. Specifically, plagiarism risk has a negative effect on fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure, while financing risk has a positive effect on fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure. Plagiarism risk is affected by information concerns, perceived control, project innovativeness, and quality of alternatives, while financing risk is affected by protection policy and information norms.

Originality/value

This study enriches crowdfunding research by identifying factors influencing fundraisers’ voluntary information disclosure and contributes to RPT by applying it in a new crowdfunding context.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Minghui Kang, Yiwen Gao, Tao Wang and Haichao Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to identify funders’ motivations for investing in crowdfunding. It applies trust theory to propose a research model including three subject…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify funders’ motivations for investing in crowdfunding. It applies trust theory to propose a research model including three subject measures – fundraiser-related, project-related and platform-related factors. Trust has been categorized into cognitive and affective dimensions to specifically analyze the influential factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Bootstrapping is employed to analyze data collected from respondents with investment experience on equity crowdfunding projects. Structural equation modeling techniques are adopted to examine the factors that influence trust between funders and crowdfunding as well as the outcomes of this trust.

Findings

The results indicate that calculus trust and relationship trust collectively or separately transmit the effect of some antecedents to investment intention. However, there is no evidence indicating the mediating effects of calculus trust and relationship trust on the relationship of structural assurance and value congruence to investment intention.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights for crowdfunding fundraisers on how to build a strong relationship with funders, and it also gives crowdfunding designers advice on how to improve and perfect the platform functions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a better understanding of the driving forces of calculus and relationship trust and their influence on investment intention. It is also the first to address a funder’s trust using a theoretical model describing the investor intention in crowdfunding and thereby extending the knowledge base of trust theory.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Changsu Kim, Minghui Kang and Tao Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether social networking site (SNS) communities benefit from collective knowledge and collaboration, which represent a portfolio…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether social networking site (SNS) communities benefit from collective knowledge and collaboration, which represent a portfolio of knowledge transfer on SNSs.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on a large scale through an online questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was employed to analyze data collected from 674 experienced SNS users.

Findings

The results indicate that all three exogenous variables, presented as user characteristics and integrated into SNS user characteristics, were positively related to the knowledge transfer portfolio, namely, to collective knowledge and collaboration, and these variables had significant moderating effects on SNS users’ community cohesiveness. Early SNS adoption was more likely than late SNS adoption to moderate the relationship between collective knowledge and community cohesiveness and that between collective collaboration and community cohesiveness.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful insights for SNS operators to enhance the process of collaborative knowledge transfer. They may also be used to obtain better insights into important factors that require closer attention during SNS use.

Originality/value

The present study provides a systematic analysis of SNS use by considering a new research model and investigating the effects of SNS-based knowledge transfer on user outcomes based on three major characteristics of SNS users. The results are expected to provide a major foundation for further SNS research and a better understanding of the relationships between SNS user characteristics, knowledge transfer, and community cohesiveness.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Tao Wang, Yalan Li, Minghui Kang and Haichao Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self-determination theory (SDT) to propose a research model that incorporates the SDT framework and contextual variables as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self-determination theory (SDT) to propose a research model that incorporates the SDT framework and contextual variables as determinants and self-identity and social identity as mediating constructs to predict individuals’ intentions toward donation crowdfunding in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the data collected from China.

Findings

The results indicate that the self-identity and social identity collectively or separately mediate the effect exerted by the sense of self-worth, face concern, moral obligation, perceived donor effectiveness, social interaction and referent network size on donation intentions. However, there is no evidence supporting the hypothesis connecting moral obligation with self-identity.

Practical implications

The study provides suggestions for service providers on how to improve and perfect the functions, and it also provides insights for donation crowdfunding fundraisers on how to increase the success rate.

Originality/value

The conclusions of this study provide academics with a more thorough understanding of the driving forces of individual behavior intention toward donation crowdfunding in China. This study further expands the SDT and identity theory in the context of donation crowdfunding, which improves their robustness in explaining behavioral intention. These theories may be an important part of future information system research.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Gary Boyd and Wojciech M. Jaworski

The purpose of this paper is to explain to educators and system developers the novel systemic instructional methodology and tools which the use to improve students'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain to educators and system developers the novel systemic instructional methodology and tools which the use to improve students' learning about and development of viable ventures and reliable software systems. This methodology is used to counteract impetuous detail – focussed thinking. For example, it has been evident that students often compromise their learning and their design work by failing to take large enough, or systemic enough, long‐term perspectives. Rarely, do they grasp the need for finding and discussing multiple alternative and contextually well‐situated strategies prior to their attempts at designing systems or plunging into the generation of software code.

Design/methodology/approach

Both analytic narratives of intentionality and executable prototype models have essential roles to play in learning about and designing systems, and this paper explains how these can be integrated. This is done by three parallel learning‐conversations: about why we are learning this?; about what is really going on here?; and about which learning strategies (meta‐cognitive strategies) to use. These conversations are carried on at the same time as cybersystemic modelling which often involves the building of a canonical formal representation of entities, relationships and transformations, making possible the running of simulations. The modelling is done using Jaworski's “j‐Maps™” notation (from which various specialized views can be generated by the “CONTEXT+”™ tools as needed). This is done in order to assess the completeness, correctness and requisite control variety aspects of actual and prospective viable systems and software.

Findings

It has been found by carefully triangulated observations over two decades of using successive versions of this methodology that graduate students who work through these activities with this notational technology, develop deeper understanding, produce more reliable software and develop more viable systems.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in presenting context map as an advanced, powerful and easy‐to‐implement method for information representation and transformation and systems development.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Vaneet Kashyap, Neelam Nakra and Ridhi Arora

The study aims to investigate the impact of “decent work” dimensions on faculty members’ work engagement levels in the higher education institutions in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate the impact of “decent work” dimensions on faculty members’ work engagement levels in the higher education institutions in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 293 faculty members working in higher education institutes in India. The proposed study hypotheses were tested by deploying the statistical technique of multiple regression analysis using statistical package for social sciences Version-24.

Findings

Results demonstrated that of the five dimensions of “decent work,” only “access to health care” and “complementary values” were significant predictors of work engagement. “Adequate compensation,” “free time and rest” and “safe interpersonal working conditions” as dimensions of “decent work” were not found to be significantly related to work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Findings encourage education policymakers to implement a “decent work” policy for faculty members with greater emphasis on ensuring workplace-fit and provision of adequate health-care facilities to keep the workforce engaged.

Originality/value

It is one of the few studies conducted in the South-Asian context that highlight “decent work” as a crucial job resource, useful in enhancing the work engagement of faculty members in higher education institutions.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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