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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

VINCENT ROFFE

It is recognised by valuers that the effects of coal mining on land in Great Britain can have a significant impact oon the value of a particular site when it is being…

Abstract

It is recognised by valuers that the effects of coal mining on land in Great Britain can have a significant impact oon the value of a particular site when it is being considered for potential surface development purposes. In this respect a great many buildings are erected successfully each year within mining areas after the effects of mining have been taken into account. If, however, the adverse effects of mining are not recognised and during the site development stage a problem suddenly appears, it is obvious that this may lead to considerable increases in cost and/or delay to the proposed development for which the land was originally purchased. Obviously with sufficient prior appreciation and investigation of the mining position such situations could be avoided. It is with this in mind that the following paper aims to indicate in broad outline, but in such detail relevant to the valuer, some of the major influences of coal mining which require to be recognised and equated in monetary terms when assessing potential site values for development purposes in mining areas.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Y.S. Yu, C.G. Ong and P. Mottahed

Computer simulation is playing an increasingly important role in evaluating the short and long term structural stability of underground mine openings, and in ground…

Abstract

Computer simulation is playing an increasingly important role in evaluating the short and long term structural stability of underground mine openings, and in ground control studies related to mine design and layout. Such simulations are increasingly being used in the design of underground salt and potash mines. Because of the viscoelastic nature of salt rock, simulation models used in these deposits must take into consideration their time dependent properties if they are to correctly predict opening closures, ground stresses, and ground stability based on prescribed failure criteria. A number of computer codes have been developed in Canada in recent years meeting these requirements. This paper describes the use of one of these codes to predict the ground behaviour of a typical room and pillar mining section of a Western Canadian potash mine. Predicted ground behaviour, based on use of the code, was compared with actual behaviour through field measurements. The study provided good correlation between predicted and measured ground behaviour, and is an encouragement to greater use of numerical modelling in mine stability studies related to mine design.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Parag C. Pendharkar and James A. Rodger

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the…

1005

Abstract

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the mainframe‐based transaction processing systems. Data mining is a process of identifying patterns in corporate transactional and operational databases (also called data warehouses). As most Fortune 500 companies are moving quickly towards the client server systems, it is increasingly becoming important that a data mining approaches should be adapted for C/S systems. In the current paper, we describe different data mining approaches that are used in the C/S systems.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1967

Whereas in pursuance of Part I of Schedule 2 to the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 the Minister of Power has published notice of his intention to make the following…

Abstract

Whereas in pursuance of Part I of Schedule 2 to the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 the Minister of Power has published notice of his intention to make the following regulations and has not received any objection to the draft thereof in respect to which he is required to refer the draft regulations for inquiry and report:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Xinwang Li, Li Li, Huayong Lv and Tianqiang Guan

This paper aims to develop a computer simulation processing method to simulate the mining operation of self-advancing semi-continuous mining technology and optimize the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a computer simulation processing method to simulate the mining operation of self-advancing semi-continuous mining technology and optimize the shift step of belt conveyor by using simulation modeling framework based on intelligent objects (SIMIO). The method would effectively solve the challenge of field testing such large-scale equipment.

Design/methodology/approach

The four operational modes of self-advancing semi-continuous mining technology at single bench had been illustrated. The operational system of this technology was analyzed and broken down to single units. By analyzing the time constitution of one operation cycle, the theoretical optimization model of shift step can be established and the optimization criteria is the time utilization ratio being maximum. Once the simulation flow was determined, a three-dimensional (3D) computer simulation model of this mining technology was developed by adapting the SIMIO simulating software to the theoretical model. The models were run to investigate the outputs from different operational modes using geological and mining data from East open-pit mine.

Findings

The result of these simulations showed that the four-mining-width one-shift (FMWOS) is at maximum production capacity during all operation modes. If transfer equipment is necessary, then this mode can adapt, but system will become more complex. There are minor differences between two-mining-width one-shift and three-mining-width one-shift. If transfer equipment is not necessary, then the two-mining-width one-shift can adapt during actual production.

Originality/value

The simulation results show that the proposed method can achieve the optimal shift step of a belt conveyor and effectively reduce the time loss caused by the coordination of multiple pieces of equipment while simultaneously improving operational efficiency.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 13 May 2015

The impact of organised crime on the mining sector.

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2007

M.W.A. Asad

This paper sets out to propose a new cut‐off optimization algorithm for effective decision making at the open pit mine planning stage.

1651

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to propose a new cut‐off optimization algorithm for effective decision making at the open pit mine planning stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The determination of optimum cut‐off grade to maximize the net present value of an open pit mining operation is influenced by the economic parameters including metal price and operating costs, the capacities of mine, mill, and refining stages, and grade distribution of the mineral deposit. The market plays a vital role in changing the economic parameters; therefore, they may escalate during mine life. The effect of these changes could be enormous on optimum cut‐off grade policy. The main motive is to introduce economic parameters escalation into the established theory of optimum cut‐off grades and study the impact of these changes on overall economics of the operation. Therefore, a cut‐off grade optimization algorithm is developed, which considers dynamic metal price and cost escalation during mine life.

Findings

A copper deposit case study shows that, keeping the metal price escalation at a minimum, the impact of mining and milling costs escalation is relatively higher than refining and administrative costs. Hence, a high‐escalation rate in mining and milling costs may change an economic operation into an uneconomic scenario.

Research limitations/implications

Management of stockpiles as a policy may be introduced in the algorithm for improvement in economy through maximum utilization of mineral resources.

Originality/value

The algorithm due to its flexibility allows analysis of various options in the least possible time, which makes it valuable to mine planners in decision making for major mining investments.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Mining update.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

PETER JACKAMAN

Of all industrial activities in these islands that of mining is perhaps the oldest. The extraction of the mineral wealth of the country — tin, iron, copper, gold, coal and…

Abstract

Of all industrial activities in these islands that of mining is perhaps the oldest. The extraction of the mineral wealth of the country — tin, iron, copper, gold, coal and so on — has been carried out since Roman times in most parts of the UK. The scale on which this was done in different periods and locations varied considerably. Coal mining, for example, as soon as it advanced beyond a quite primitive stage, involved fairly large units of exploitation with several hundred people employed, while tin mining in Cornwall was carried out often by fairly small family units of between thirty to forty individuals, lead mining falling mid‐way between these mo extremes and employing between 50 and 200 men usually. The principal lead mining areas in Great Britain were: [1] Durham and Northumberland (the North Pennine field) [2] the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire [3] the Derbyshire Peak [4] Flintshire [5] Cardiganshire and south west Montgomery and [6] the Lanarkshire and Dumfriesshire borders. Of these the Scottish field was the smallest, contributing about 5% of the total British output. Commonly a major problem facing those trying to exploit these mineral resources was the isolated location of many of the mineral areas. Employers had to attract workers to the mining location. To do this they found it necessary to resort either to the forcible pressing of paupers and felons, thereby instituting a form of serfdom to bind the worker to the mine for life and, effectively, to bind his children after him, or to providing conditions and amenities which would prove attractive to free workers.

Details

Library Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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