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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

A number of oleochemicals have found application in the formulation of metal processing lubricants. Calcium palmitate can act as a gelling inhibitor for lubricants for…

Abstract

A number of oleochemicals have found application in the formulation of metal processing lubricants. Calcium palmitate can act as a gelling inhibitor for lubricants for non‐chip metal forming, and diglyceryl oleate and sodium oleyl sulphate have been employed in chipless forming and machining lubricants. Glyceryl monooleate has been used together with paraffin wax and xylene for forming aluminium sheets, and isopropyl oleate has been blended into lubricants for cold forming of metal. Lubrication in cold forming of steel and aluminium alloys has been promoted by the use of sodium stearate and phosphating processes. Stearic acid has also been utlized in metal forming. Butyl butanamine stearamide is applicable in lubricants for non‐ferrous metal working, and coatings that can prevent galling when titanium is cold worked can be formed on the metal by the use of 0.5 grams of hydrofluoric acid, with 10 grams stearic acid in 100 ml. of a solvent, the process being accelerated by the inclusion of phosphoric acid at 0.85 grams. Calcium stearate has also been used in solvent‐based metalworking Iubricants, in acrylic electrophoretic lubricant coatings on metal, and in bentonite‐containing metalworking oils. Mixtures of cetyl alcohol and tricresyl phosphate have been cast into slabs and used on metalworking tools.

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 76 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

A.R. Saunders

The West European metalworking lubricants market has seen a number of major changes in the past decade.

Abstract

The West European metalworking lubricants market has seen a number of major changes in the past decade.

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Carlos Alberto Schuch Bork, Janaina Fracaro Souza Gonçalves and Jefferson Oliveira Gomes

This article aims to collect data on the aluminum alloy 7050-T7451 machinability used in the manufacturing of aeronautical structures, using the combination of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to collect data on the aluminum alloy 7050-T7451 machinability used in the manufacturing of aeronautical structures, using the combination of the jatropha vegetable-base soluble cutting oil in relation to the canola vegetal and semisynthetic mineral oils and the technique to apply cutting fluid by flood in relation to the Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) in the milling process (HSM – high-speed machining).

Design/methodology/approach

It was observed that the jatropha vegetal cutting oil presented the best results in relation to requirements for lubrication, superficial mean roughness (index Ra) and shape errors in relation to the other oils in both the techniques to apply fluid which were tested. Comparing the application techniques, the jatropha vegetal oil offered an increase in the life span of the cutting tool, using the flood technique, exceeding in almost six times the machined length of the cutting tool in relation to the MQL technique in the same process conditions.

Findings

The Jatropha vegetable-base cutting oil, besides being produced from a renewable source, has inherent characteristics that can help attain a sustainable manufacturing, mainly with the use of the flood technique to apply cutting fluid in the aluminum alloy 7050-T7451 machining.

Originality/value

The Jatropha (vegetable) oil, in relation to its physicochemical properties, appeared to be the best one fit for being used in the machining of aluminum alloys 7050-T7451 because it did not interfere with any of the elements involved in the formation of intergranular corrosion and/or pitting, which are not allowed in the aeronautical production of parts. Jatropha (vegetable) cutting oil, besides being produced from a clean and renewable source, has the inherent characteristics that can help attain a sustainable manufacturing.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

In the late 19th century, work attributed to a Mr F. W. Taylor showed that water flooding a cutting area permitted a great increase in cutting speeds. Prior to this cutting

Abstract

In the late 19th century, work attributed to a Mr F. W. Taylor showed that water flooding a cutting area permitted a great increase in cutting speeds. Prior to this cutting was performed dry, at very slow speeds, but it was found that water gave an easier removal of swarf, enabling the cutting speed to be increased by some 40 to 50%. Water, obviously, gave rise to the problems of corrosion.

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1941

THE considerations involved in the successful machining of aluminium and its alloys have sprung into particular prominence during the last year or so with the greatly…

Abstract

THE considerations involved in the successful machining of aluminium and its alloys have sprung into particular prominence during the last year or so with the greatly increased use of these materials under the armaments expansion programme. Numerous firms who have hitherto confined their attentions to steels and non‐ferrous metals like brass and copper arc now engaged in the mass production of parts machined from extruded, rolled and cast aluminium and aluminium alloys. These light metals are by no means difficult to machine but their particular properties require a special technique if full advantage is to be taken of the economy resulting from the high speed at which they may be worked.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Abstract

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1959

C.J. Taylor and B.V. Harris

NEW INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS, the demand for higher productivity and the requirements for ever smaller tolerances have resulted in great advances in machine tool design and in…

Abstract

NEW INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS, the demand for higher productivity and the requirements for ever smaller tolerances have resulted in great advances in machine tool design and in cutting tool materials. Cutting fluids have a significant part to play in this story but they can only play their full part if they are correctly chosen and if their proper functions are understood. Increased rates of metal removal can then be achieved and problems associated with difficult or hazardous machining operations reduced or even eliminated.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 11 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1957

A method extensively used in the production of optically flat and finely finished surfaces is that of lapping the surface upon a plate using a loose abrasive mixed into a…

Abstract

A method extensively used in the production of optically flat and finely finished surfaces is that of lapping the surface upon a plate using a loose abrasive mixed into a slurry form with a carrying fluid. If the surfaces finished in this way are in continuous or intermittent sliding contact, it is the author's opinion that any abrasives retained in their surfaces will affect surface wear. This paper reported on some exploratory work to indicate the degree of embedment of abrasive in certain materials lapped by hand.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 9 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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