Search results

1 – 10 of 34
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Julie Arnold

This research explores the ways in which a pre-service teacher (Deidre) reflects on experiences to develop transformation into a professional educator. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the ways in which a pre-service teacher (Deidre) reflects on experiences to develop transformation into a professional educator. This study investigates how pre-service teachers engage in dialogue and art to elaborate and reflect on learning experiences, which provide evidence of mindshift and emergent knowledge and teacher identity.

Design/methodology/approach

Often difficult to measure and trace, this work presents the emerging transformation of a pre-service teacher through ethnographic methodology, stories and artful practice.

Findings

As part of a larger study, the design reveals transformative mindshift from pre-service teacher reflective stories. Data from interviews and artful practice reveal evidence of moments of pedagogical impact, which contribute to identity and professional practice (Clandinin et al., 2006; Loughran, 2006).

Social implications

Focusing on “what”, “when” and “how” transitions occur is explored to further understand the professional development in initial teacher education.

Originality/value

Building on research undertaken by Cochran-Smith and Lytle (1999), this investigation draws on artful reflections and stories to evidence elements of powerful pedagogical learning in order to teach in the world of professional practice.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Julie Arnold

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the way in which pre-service teachers adopt ways of thinking critically about learning and practice. It highlights the unfolding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the way in which pre-service teachers adopt ways of thinking critically about learning and practice. It highlights the unfolding of critical dialogue, knowledge and artful action as a way of “reading the scene” (Pahl and McKenna, 2015). The focus concerns mindshifts that occur while learning to be a teacher. The study sets out to seek factors that contribute towards development as professional practitioner.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a much larger study involving ten pre-service teachers, this paper focusses on just one participant named Meredith, a pre-service teacher in her fourth year of her teacher education course. The design constructed draws on the data from Meredith’s interview and conversation, art making and gestural activity while painting and communicating her stories. These narratives from interviews exist in this paper as vignettes and privilege of the interplay of art making, interview and gestural responses. Implementing a framework by Denzin (2001) enables a way of reading to note learning and epiphanic moments that exist for Meredith.

Findings

Moment of learning and themes are indicated and suggest that from the original interview there are 11 important moments of epiphanic mindshifts for Meredith.

Originality/value

The method as practice intends to make cogent links to new levels of consciousness by presenting innovative ways in which qualitative research data can be gathered and analysed. Meredith engages in mindshifts that occur as learner and also embraces experiences of praxis as a means of understanding self and teacher identity.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Annick Janson and Robert J. McQueen

The paper seeks to capture leadership tacit knowledge mechanisms built throughout leaders' careers. Learning to be a leader involves developing the tacit knowledge to give…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to capture leadership tacit knowledge mechanisms built throughout leaders' careers. Learning to be a leader involves developing the tacit knowledge to give confidence in one's decisions. Most of the knowledge required cannot be acquired from explicit documents – rather, it is built through action, experience and reflection. This research focuses on leadership in the innovation context where learning potentially occurs through a variety of knowledge building processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Narratives from 31 leaders who have achieved success in innovation leadership were collected piloting a tacit knowledge articulation methodology. From the narratives, a model is proposed which is embedded in the leadership career pathways of these innovation leaders.

Findings

The findings suggest that leadership tacit knowledge mechanisms evolve with organisations' life cycle. A bi‐focal (developmental and “locus of knowledge“ factors) model was assembled to explain how successful leadership involves balancing “locus of learning” from internal and external sources and facilitating mind‐shifts (e.g. collaboration and communication paradigms underlying relationship and networking processes).

Research limitations/implications

The study sample size was relatively small – further replications with a larger number of subjects and in different contexts are planned or under way.

Practical implications

This research has implications relevant to both leaders interested in bringing their organizations to their next developmental level and to practitioners because leverage points are identified at which interventions designed to share the lessons learned from successful leaders will be most effective.

Originality/value

Tacit leadership knowledge is not easily transferred into explicit “how‐to” instructions for consumption by a prospective innovation leader, yet it is a major source of competitive advantage. It is more appropriate to view innovation leadership development as a tacit knowledge building process in individuals and groups, rather than a knowledge transfer from knowledgeable leaders to wannabe leaders. A developmental model is proposed that integrates the changes occurring in learning patterns while firms expand their loci of knowledge.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

George Richard Lueddeke

Environmental degradation, economic and political threats along with ideological extremism necessitate a global redirection toward sustainability and well-being. Since the…

Abstract

Environmental degradation, economic and political threats along with ideological extremism necessitate a global redirection toward sustainability and well-being. Since the survival of all species (humans, animals, and plants) is wholly dependent on a healthy planet, urgent action at the highest levels to address large-scale interconnected problems is needed to counter the thinking that perpetuates the “folly of a limitless world.” Paralleling critical societal roles played by universities – ancient, medieval, and modern – throughout the millennia, this chapter calls for all universities and higher education institutions (HEIs) generally – estimated at over 28,000 – to take a lead together in tackling the pressing complex and intractable challenges that face us. There are about 250 million students in tertiary education worldwide rising to about 600 million by 2040. Time is not on our side. While much of the groundwork has been done by the United Nations (UN) and civil society, concerns remain over the variable support given to the UN-2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially in light of the negative impact of global biodiversity loss on achieving the UN-2030 SDGs. Ten propositions for global sustainability, ranging from adopting the SDGs at national and local levels to ensuring peaceful uses of technology and UN reforms in line with global socioeconomic shifts, are provided for consideration by decisionmakers. Proposition #7 calls for the unifying One Health & Well-Being (OHWB) concept to become the cornerstone of our educational systems as well as societal institutions and to underpin the UN-2030 SDGs. Recognizing the need to change our worldview (belief systems) from human-centrism to eco-centrism, and re-building of trust in our institutions, the chapter argues for the re-conceptualization of the university/higher education purpose and scope focusing on the development of an interconnected ecological knowledge system with a concern for the whole Earth – and beyond. The 2019 novel coronavirus has made clear that the challenges facing our world cannot be solved by individual nations alone and that there is an urgency to committing to shared global values that reflect the OHWB concept and approach. By drawing on our collective experience and expertise informed by the UN-2030 SDGs, we will be in a much stronger position to shape and strengthen multilateral strategies to achieve the UN-2030 Transformative Vision – “ending poverty, hunger, inequality and protecting the Earth’s natural resources,” and thereby helping “to save the world from itself.”

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Cherry Stewart and Ashfaq Ahmad Khan

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical concepts of adult constructive development (ACD) in response to a requirement to teach fully online during the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical concepts of adult constructive development (ACD) in response to a requirement to teach fully online during the COVID-19 lockdown. However, responses have been unique for many university educators, regardless of the roles they have in supporting students during this time. How each person approaches the changing context can be enhanced by an understanding of their mindset as defined by Kegan’s theory.

Design/methodology/approach

An accounting academic and educational designer combine their expertise and engage a “digital mindset” to guide the re-design of the management accounting unit incorporating strategies that encourage students to be self-reliant yet learn from a broad diversity of perspectives.

Findings

Unexpected changes within an educational environment may be the catalyse needed to force significant rethinking of pedagogical practice within the online teaching space.

Practical implications

This paper offers practical thinking and design tips for creating interactive learning and teaching programs to develop a positive and supportive approach that challenges and facilitates cognitive growth in student knowledge, skills and learning behaviours.

Social implications

Stimulating student interaction via the creation of interactive and dynamic online curriculum design teachers may communicate more effectively with students as well as sharing their knowledge and skills with each other.

Originality/value

The authors explore Kegan’s ACD framework (1982, 1998, 2009) within the context of tertiary teaching and learning design for management accounting. The authors propose online strategies for each of the levels of development in the form of supports and challenges.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Meta L. Krüger

The growing knowledge society has caused a change in the meaning of knowledge and learning. In Dutch schools, this creates a demand for evidence-based innovation and…

Abstract

The growing knowledge society has caused a change in the meaning of knowledge and learning. In Dutch schools, this creates a demand for evidence-based innovation and school development and a need for working with data. This chapter focuses on leadership in changing schools including the difference between management (organizing, structuring, and budgeting things that already work); leadership (adapting things that do not run smoothly, stimulating, motivating and empowering people, and communicating vision); and relationship with interactional and transformational leadership. Consequently, inquiry-based leadership is becoming the center of interest internationally (Geijsel, Krüger, & Sleegers, 2010; Luo, 2008). The author presents a conceptual framework for deeper understanding of school leadership in the 21st century – that to be effective in their roles, they must learn how to create inquiry-based cultures in their schools and to continuously learn from data. Finally, the author identifies some challenges for school leaders in coming years and proposes ways that help strengthen their leadership including the professionalization for all leaders oriented to instructional leadership, inquiry-based leadership, higher order thinking and distributed leadership.

Details

Global Perspectives on Educational Leadership Reform: The Development and Preparation of Leaders of Learning and Learners of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-445-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Larraine Segil

To show how the key to successfully managing alliances is developing and implementing alliance metrics.

Abstract

Purpose

To show how the key to successfully managing alliances is developing and implementing alliance metrics.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of “Acme Manufacturing” (a composite of several firms) is used to illustrate the theory and reasoning behind the creation and tracking of alliance metrics appropriate to the life cycle of the partnership. These ideas are then applied to the ongoing Avnet/HP alliance.

Findings

Understanding and applying unique metrics at each stage allows management to anticipate alliance challenges and increase flexibility and adaptability when faced with changing economic and market conditions. Across the life cycle stages the partners must learn to monitor two types of measurements – development metrics, commonly employed in the start‐up and high growth stages, and implementation metrics, engaged throughout the professional, mature, decline, and sustain stages of the life cycle.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study produced by a consultant specializing in alliance management. It has been peer reviewed but has not been subjected to independent audit.

Practical implications

Proactively managing alliances helps partners ensure value extraction, financial and non‐financial. Development metrics and implementation metrics can help alliance stakeholders understand and plan for the stages of the alliance life cycle while considering their knowledge transfer.

Originality/value

As the cases of Acme Manufacturing and Avnet/HP show, an understanding of alliance life cycles, cultures, and metrics can lead to successful planning, launching, and maintenance of a company's alliances.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Philip R. Harris

Reviews how the GEO model can assist European managers to meet the challenges in the new work culture.

Abstract

Reviews how the GEO model can assist European managers to meet the challenges in the new work culture.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Cheryl J. Craig, Paige K. Evans, Rakesh Verma, Donna W. Stokes and Jing Li

This narrative inquiry examines teachers' influences on undergraduate/graduate students who enrolled in STEM programs and intended to enter STEM careers. Three National…

Abstract

This narrative inquiry examines teachers' influences on undergraduate/graduate students who enrolled in STEM programs and intended to enter STEM careers. Three National Science Foundation (NSF) scholarship grants sat in the backdrop. Narrative exemplars were crafted using the interpretative tools of broadening, burrowing, storying and restorying, fictionalization, and serial interpretation. Three diverse students' narratives constituted the science education cases: one from teacher education, another about cybertechnology, and a third involving cybersecurity. The influence of the university students' former teachers cohered around five themes: (1) same program-different narratives, (2) in loco parentis, (3) counterstories, (4) learning in small moments, and (5) the importance of the liberal arts in STEM education. The students' narratives form instructive models for their siblings and other students pursuing STEM degrees/careers. Most importantly, the multiperspectival stories of experiences capture the far-reaching impact of “unsung teachers” whose long-term influence is greatly underestimated by the public.

Details

Preparing Teachers to Teach the STEM Disciplines in America’s Urban Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-457-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of 34