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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Peter R.A. Oeij, Tinka Van Vuuren, Steven Dhondt, Jeff Gaspersz and Ernest M.M. De Vroome

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether insights into high reliability organizations (HROs) are useful for innovation management teams. HRO teams can keep…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether insights into high reliability organizations (HROs) are useful for innovation management teams. HRO teams can keep failure to a minimum level due to high alertness and resilience. Project teams working on innovation management could benefit from HRO principles and thus reduce their chances of failure.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey among in total 260 team members and team leaders of project teams in innovation management was conducted to study the relation between, on the one hand, organizational features of HROs (“mindful infrastructure”) and HRO principles (adjusted as “innovation resilience behaviour”, IRB), and on the other hand, between mindful infrastructure and IRB and project outcomes.

Findings

From the results it could be concluded that mindful infrastructure associates with IRB, and that IRB has a mediating role in the relation between mindful infrastructure and project outcomes. Innovation management project teams can thus learn from the practice of HRO teams.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, HRO-thinking has not been applied to team behaviour in innovation management. A fruitful transfer of insights from the domain of safety and crisis management seems applicable to the domain of innovation.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Peter R.A. Oeij, Steven Dhondt and Jeff Gaspersz

This paper aims to investigate the principles of high reliability organisations (HROs), present in safety and crisis teams, as applied to innovation teams. Safety and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the principles of high reliability organisations (HROs), present in safety and crisis teams, as applied to innovation teams. Safety and crisis teams cannot fail, as failure leads to disaster and casualties. Innovation teams cannot fail either, as this harms the organisations’ competitiveness and effectiveness. Do HRO principles, rooted in mindful infrastructure, enable innovation resilience behaviour (IRB)?

Design/methodology/approach

A study of 18 innovation projects performed by project teams was carried out. A survey by team members/leaders of these teams was completed; team members/leaders of other projects were added to achieve a larger sample. Mindful infrastructure consists of team psychological safety, team learning, complexity leadership and team voice. The analyses assessed the teams’ mindful infrastructures as a causal condition enabling IRB.

Findings

Applying qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), the findings indicate that mindful infrastructure enables team IRB, which is a set of team behaviours indicating their resilience when encountering critical incidents. Teams apply different “paths” to IRB.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory study’s generalizability is limited. The findings nonetheless indicate the usefulness of non-linear techniques for understanding different roads to successful innovation processes.

Practical implications

HRO principles are applicable by non-HROs. These require investments in organisational learning.

Originality/value

HRO studies fail to account for the antecedents of HRO principles. This study groups these antecedents of team behaviour into a mindful infrastructure. QCA has not been applied within the domain of HROs before and only scarcely within the domain of innovation teams.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 22 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper concentrates on how components of innovation resilience behavior (IRB) such as team psychological safety can be applied to solving innovation project problems. Adopting a mindful infrastructure that supports IRB can reduce the occurrence of errors by curating an experimental working culture where mistakes are viewed as a positive source of learning, rather than as negative personal failures.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Marjolein C.J. Caniëls and Jeroen P. de Jong

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Roozbeh Hesamamiri, Mohammad Mahdavi Mazdeh and Mostafa Jafari

As a way of assessing the ability of organizations to discover and manage unexpected failures in organizational capabilities of knowledge management (KM), this study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

As a way of assessing the ability of organizations to discover and manage unexpected failures in organizational capabilities of knowledge management (KM), this study aims to develop a measurement instrument that involves the five reliability dimensions of preoccupation with failure, reluctance to simplify interpretations, sensitivity to operations, commitment to resilience, and deference to expertise.

Design/methodology/approach

To generate measurement items, previous research related to organizational reliability, high reliability theory, mindfulness, and required organizational capabilities of KM was reviewed. The measurement instrument was then verified in terms of reliability and validity, empirically using data from 240 companies in North America. Internal consistency of measurements, measurement item reliability, and construct reliability were examined to ensure the reliability of the instrument. Based on confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modelling, construct validity was also tested.

Findings

The reliability evaluation instrument for KM suggested in this study was constructed with four dimensions, preoccupation with failure in KM, sensitivity to KM operations, commitment to resilience in KM, and deference to expertise. The related measurement items were also identified.

Practical implications

This instrument is useful for researchers and executives looking for appropriate outcomes through the implementation of KM initiatives. Furthermore, the study provides a starting point for further research on KM reliability.

Originality/value

To date, while many of the KM success or failure studies have relied on developing success factors or organizational capability requirements, few studies have been conducted to identify evaluation measures that can assess the cognitive infrastructure that enables simultaneous adaptive learning and provides organizational reliability infrastructure through the management of unwanted, unanticipated, and unexplainable failures in KM-required capabilities.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Jessica L. Ford

The purpose of this paper is to complicate and critique contemporary scholarship on high-reliability organizations (HROs). This paper argues that although HRO scholarship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complicate and critique contemporary scholarship on high-reliability organizations (HROs). This paper argues that although HRO scholarship helps to identify communicative patterns that facilitate reliability and safety, it also simplifies processes that undermine the effectiveness of existing recommendations for HROs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper frames high-reliability organizing as the enactment of mindfulness, which is the theoretical mechanism behind each of the five principles of high-reliability organizing. Using this framework, this paper then elaborates on each of the HRO principles: preoccupation with failure, reluctance to simplify interpretations, sensitivity to operations, commitment to resilience, and deference to expertise.

Findings

This paper details how research guided by HRO theory must address the following obstacles to safety and resilience: information accessibility limiting preoccupation with failure, identity constructions encouraging the simplification of interpretations, message fatigue repressing sensitivity to operations, the information environment within HROs weakening commitment to resilience, and generational differences impeding deference to expertise.

Originality/value

This paper highlights key issues obstructing safety and reliability in organizations that have been largely ignored by extant literature and encourages scholars to do more to acknowledge the role communication plays in constituting and reconstituting organizational reliability. Failing to fully address complex communicative interactions in HROs obstructs efforts to safeguard employee health and safety.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

David Newsome

This paper aims to provide a readily accessible synopsis of a complex subject and consider sustainability from a personal experiential level right through to a big picture…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a readily accessible synopsis of a complex subject and consider sustainability from a personal experiential level right through to a big picture study in the context of sustainable cities.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of personal experiences, on-line sources and research papers were used to trace the complex human dilemma of achieving sustainability in city environments. Although a difficult task for many people to embrace, the study presented here forwards the idea that it is possible for individuals, communities and governments to make a positive contribution by engaging in the garden city concept.

Findings

This paper provides a context and study on the complexities surrounding achieving sustainable cities, yet at the same time providing some insight as to what can be achieved if all levels of society are engaged.

Research limitations/implications

This paper emphasises the issues surrounding and importance of sustainable cities and considers a tangible goal for city dwellers at all levels of society.

Practical implications

This paper enables an appreciation of the role urban gardens, right through to the role that appropriate government policy, can play in contributing to, developing and conserving greenspace in cities.

Social implications

This paper fosters a simplified understanding of the potential of citizen contribution providing there is some awareness and the motivation to make a difference.

Originality/value

The study offers a brief personal perspective and connects this with relevant literature to build a case that urban sustainability, although complex, is achievable even though it may take small steps in gaining the necessary momentum.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Alain Guiette, Paul Matthyssens and Koen Vandenbempt

The purpose of this paper is organizing mindfully for relevant process research on strategic change. This essay arises from an increasing concern that our understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is organizing mindfully for relevant process research on strategic change. This essay arises from an increasing concern that our understanding of strategic change is not delivering meaningful, relevant and true process wisdom that allows researchers to enrich their academic discourse and practitioners to effectively realize strategic change imposed by hostile business markets. Our goal is to challenge fundamental assumptions of our field’s dominant discourse in performing research and generating theories for strategic change under real contexts, and redirect attention to a mindful organizing perspective to understand process elements of strategic change that really matter.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an essay based on theoretical reasoning. We address the relevance gap in the strategic business marketing field by focusing on one specific gap: the study and understanding of strategic change. To illustrate the relevance of a mindful organizing perspective for closing this relevance gap, we focus on the processes of mindful organizing identified by Weick and Sutcliffe (2007) and argue how these organizational processes contribute to a better understanding of strategic change while implicitly assuming a complexity-based perspective on organizing. These five processes, moreover, address the identified limitations of present approaches, i.e. formative causality, pre-interpretation and independent linearity.

Findings

We suggest a “provocative change research avenue” elaborating on the role of mindful organizing to bridge the relevance gap in this area. This advances a richer and more relevant framing to elevate theorizing in the area of strategic marketing and management beyond existing avenues, which not necessarily reflects organizational life’s equivocality, interdependencies and intricacies. We, thus, call for the field of strategic marketing and management to adopt a discourse grounded in complexity-based assumptions.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, this essay highlights that closing relevance gaps in our field cannot be done with quick fix recipes. The endeavor implies a fundamental re-framing of the way we look at firms and managers. It also implies different theoretical underpinnings and more interpretive research approaches to tap the richness in real-life business settings. By focusing on one area, we have shown how such an effort might proceed.

Practical implications

Although the paper is mainly written for researchers of change processes and innovation in industrial companies, practitioners will get inspiration as several viewpoints for mindful organizing will help them in building a more realistic and viable change approach.

Originality/value

Our intended contribution is to advocate a deeper and richer process understanding of strategic change by advancing mindful organizing as an epistemological and praxeological perspective on strategic change, thereby bridging the relevance gap (Hodgkinson and Rousseau, 2009; Weick, 2001) and enriching our field’s strategic change theories. Epistemologically, mindful organizing offers a useful perspective by stressing the change process’ complexity, interdependence and emergence. Praxeologically, mindful organizing represents an adaptive organizational capability that allows organizations to develop higher awareness of their strategic change processes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Can Uslay and Emine Erdogan

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and explore the tenets of the mindful entrepreneurial marketing (MEM) construct and to illustrate its mediation effect between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and explore the tenets of the mindful entrepreneurial marketing (MEM) construct and to illustrate its mediation effect between production and consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the existing mindfulness and entrepreneurial marketing research, this paper explores tenets of MEM and presents a basic taxonomy to identify mindful production and consumption practices, and opportunities for MEM initiatives.

Findings

The study proposes that the combination of mindfulness and entrepreneurial marketing approach provides an ideal match where both consumers and mindful producers can become more mindful and prosper. As a new construct, MEM has the potential to alleviate lack of consumption, to create awareness about overconsumption and, ultimately, to enhance societal welfare by increasing the efficiency of markets by enabling more effective usage of society’s resources.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study that focuses on the MEM construct. In this respect, the study contributes to mindfulness, mindful marketing, entrepreneurial marketing and the general marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Jabran Khan, Mastura Jaafar, Basharat Javed, Namra Mubarak and Tahira Saudagar

Through the lens of the leader–member exchange theory, this study assessed the relationship between inclusive leadership (IL) and project success by incorporating the…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of the leader–member exchange theory, this study assessed the relationship between inclusive leadership (IL) and project success by incorporating the mediating roles of psychological empowerment (PE) and psychological safety (PS).

Design/methodology/approach

Time-lagged data were collected from 328 employees working in project-based organisations across the information technology industry. Structural equation modelling (SEM) using AMOS 26 was employed for data analysis.

Findings

By using the SEM approach, the confirmatory factor analysis had verified the distinctiveness of the variables used in this study. The findings displayed that IL increased project success both directly and indirectly through the mediating roles of PE and PS.

Originality/value

This study addressed two research questions that have been left unanswered in the literature. The initial research question is “how IL enhances project success?”, and this study found that IL enhanced project success. The second research question is “what are the suggested mechanisms for IL to promote project success?” This study has proven that IL enhanced project success through two important mediating mechanisms, namely, PE and PS.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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