Search results

1 – 7 of 7
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Sanjog R. Misra and Minakshi Trivedi

The use of modeling and statistics for the design and development of pricing strategy is prevalent in academia as well as the industry. One of the more commonly used tools…

24077

Abstract

The use of modeling and statistics for the design and development of pricing strategy is prevalent in academia as well as the industry. One of the more commonly used tools by researchers and managers alike for the estimation of linear demand models is the ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Unfortunately, a majority of data sets to which such models are applied suffer from nonstationarity ‐ that is, the dependence of a variable on its prior values ‐ thereby violating the assumptions of a basic (naïve) regression model. Estimates of variables under these conditions are known commonly to be inflated and inaccurate. While this problem is well‐known and can be corrected for among statisticians and econometricians, a simple and effective tool has not yet been designed for managers ‐ the actual users of such models. Studies some of the problems encountered when using a naïve model and proposes a simple method to check for nonstationarity and redesign the model to account for the same. Using scanner data on soup, shows that the redesigned model predicts better, fits better and offers more meaningful results. Finally, looks at the implications of estimating such models for pricing strategies and issues. Surface response analysis shows how a manager can use such models for conducting insightful studies on price sensitivity.

Details

Pricing Strategy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4905

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Minakshi Trivedi and Michael S. Morgan

Research conducted over the last decade, on the influence of brand inertia or variety seeking on promotional response, has yielded mixed results. Variety seekers have been…

3157

Abstract

Research conducted over the last decade, on the influence of brand inertia or variety seeking on promotional response, has yielded mixed results. Variety seekers have been found to be more price‐sensitive by one set of researchers, while another stream of work finds them to be less sensitive. Reconciling the two findings, the current study empirically addresses the proposition that variety seekers use price promotions strategically, as a way to experiment with different brands over time. Although consumers evaluate price promotions differently according to whether the promoted brand is more or less intrinsically favored than a reference brand, high and low variety seekers respond to brand comparisons differently, leading to differences in evaluation and responsiveness to price promotion offers. The empirical results confirm that high variety seekers are less sensitive to the preference order of considered brands, but only within a limited range of intrinsic brand favorability. Once differences in brand favorability are accounted for, moreover, finds that high variety seekers are more sensitive to promotional effort. This is compatible with the notion that, within an acceptable set of brands, variety seekers use price promotions as a low‐cost strategy for experiencing different brands over time. This understanding of the relationship among promotional offers, specific brands and consumer segments, provides valuable insights to brand managers as they consider their strategic promotional options, and design an effective promotional strategy.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Minakshi Trivedi, Michael S. Morgan and Kalpesh Kaushik Desai

The purpose of this paper is to study the informational role played by an intermediary in the service industry.

2420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the informational role played by an intermediary in the service industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used survey and choice data collected from agents and customers, respectively, in the hotel industry.

Findings

The paper shows that informational role of agents in choice varies from mere facilitation of the transaction (e.g. making reservation) to a more active role involving accurate predictions about attributes that consumers will perceive important, more realistic performance evaluation of choice options and providing information about experience attributes. The results also show how an agent's role depends on customer's prior knowledge about the choice options, the goal underlying service consumption (e.g. business vs vacation travel), benefits sought by the consumer and the agent's perception about a long term relationship with the consumer. Finally, the results also reveal a unique pattern of differences between agents and consumers in the perceived importance and performance ratings of various features of the service.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to agents in the hotel industry. The hypotheses should be tested on other service agent industries such as airlines and restaurants. Future research should consider other alternative sources of information that consumers may use, such as printed material.

Originality/value

The unique nature of the data set – that is, information from the agent as well as the consumer on the same transaction – offers a great opportunity to study the two different points of view and test some hypothesis regarding the degree to which the players understand each other.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Michael S. Morgan and Minakshi Trivedi

The purpose of this paper is to study the motivations of an agent in a service industry to honestly represent the quality of a service provider.

1115

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the motivations of an agent in a service industry to honestly represent the quality of a service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a theoretical modeling and derives implications from it, which are then tested using empirical data.

Findings

The main finding of the paper is that the agent's propensity to overstate the service provider's true quality level increases as the relative price of the service increases.

Research limitations/implications

The testable implications are tested in the hotel industry. One could extend this to alternative services. It should be noted, however, that since the modeling framework is general, so too will be the implications that arise from it.

Originality/value

The theoretical development in the paper from which the implications arise, gives the results a strong foundation and lends some validity to the work. This is complemented by a unique data set that supplies information from the agent as well as the consumer regarding the same transaction. This offers a unique opportunity to study the two different points of view, and test some propositions regarding the degree to which the players understand each other.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Minakshi Trivedi and Michael S. Morgan

Provides a new way to look at competitive brand strategy through analysis of switching, where the only data required are market‐level brand‐switching matrices. The…

2609

Abstract

Provides a new way to look at competitive brand strategy through analysis of switching, where the only data required are market‐level brand‐switching matrices. The parameters indicate, for each brand, the degree to which it insulates itself from competition. Shows empirically that this insulation is characteristic of both market leaders and market nichers. Compares results across eight data sets which range from consumer packaged goods to services to durables. Suggests that, by applying this method to panel or survey data, managers can better map out long‐term marketing strategies such as product design, segment targeting and advertising campaigns, and gives some examples of how this can be carried out.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Seth Ketron, Rodney Runyan and M. Theodore Farris II

The current work reviews all retailing articles published in four prominent retailing journals – Journal of Retailing, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services

Abstract

Purpose

The current work reviews all retailing articles published in four prominent retailing journals – Journal of Retailing, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, and International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research – in the 2009-2015 period, picking up where Runyan and Hyun (2009) left off. The purpose of this paper is to identify leading authors and institutions in retailing research based on overall impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis/literature review/descriptive research.

Findings

In total, 1,392 articles were published during this time period, and through a procedure of weights and adjustments for author count, journal impact, journal quality, and journal publishing opportunity, the findings reveal that research collaboration is highly prevalent, as evidenced by the high number of multi-authored papers and cross-university/international partnerships. Additionally, some authors and institutions remain influential, while others have emerged as highly influential in the last seven years. This shows the dynamic nature of the field and the need to remain active in quality publishing.

Research limitations/implications

Scholars must understand that several factors influence impact judgments, which cannot be assessed using raw counts alone. Journal quality, impact, and publishing opportunity as well as author counts are important elements to consider.

Originality/value

These reviews are vital to the field in that they provide status updates on scholarship, so these reviews should be done periodically. Additionally, the findings in this paper provide a more holistic understanding of research impact and permit better assessment for scholars and administrators.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7