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Publication date: 5 August 2019

Jessica Johnson

On Inauguration Day 2017, Milo Yiannopoulos gave a talk sponsored by the University of Washington College Republicans entitled “Cyberbullying Isn’t Real.” This chapter is…

Abstract

On Inauguration Day 2017, Milo Yiannopoulos gave a talk sponsored by the University of Washington College Republicans entitled “Cyberbullying Isn’t Real.” This chapter is based on participant-observation conducted in the crowd outside the venue that night and analyzes the violence that occurs when the blurring of the boundaries between “free” and “hate” speech is enacted on the ground. This ethnographic examination rethinks relationships between law, bodies, and infrastructure as it considers debates over free speech on college campuses from the perspectives of legal and public policy, as well as those who supported and protested Yiannopoulos’s right to speak at the University of Washington. First, this analysis uses ethnographic research to critique the absolutist free speech argument presented by the legal scholars Erwin Chemerinsky and Howard Gillman. Second, this essay uses the theoretical work of Judith Butler and Sara Ahmed to make claims concerning relationships between speech, vulnerability, and violence. In so doing, this chapter argues that debates over free speech rights on college campuses need to be situated by processes of neoliberalization in higher education and reconsidered in light of the ways in which an absolutist position disproportionately protects certain people at the expense of certain others.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-058-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

David Martín-Moncunill, Miguel-Ángel Sicilia-Urban, Elena García-Barriocanal and Salvador Sánchez-Alonso

Large terminologies usually contain a mix of terms that are either generic or domain specific, which makes the use of the terminology itself a difficult task that may…

Abstract

Purpose

Large terminologies usually contain a mix of terms that are either generic or domain specific, which makes the use of the terminology itself a difficult task that may limit the positive effects of these systems. The purpose of this paper is to systematically evaluate the degree of domain specificity of the AGROVOC controlled vocabulary terms as a representative of a large terminology in the agricultural domain and discuss the generic/specific boundaries across its hierarchy.

Design/methodology/approach

A user-oriented study with domain-experts in conjunction with quantitative and systematic analysis. First an in-depth analysis of AGROVOC was carried out to make a proper selection of terms for the experiment. Then domain-experts were asked to classify the terms according to their domain specificity. An evaluation was conducted to analyse the domain-experts’ results. Finally, the resulting data set was automatically compared with the terms in SUMO, an upper ontology and MILO, a mid-level ontology; to analyse the coincidences.

Findings

Results show the existence of a high number of generic terms. The motivation for several of the unclear cases is also depicted. The automatic evaluation showed that there is not a direct way to assess the specificity degree of a term by using SUMO and MILO ontologies, however, it provided additional validation of the results gathered from the domain-experts.

Research limitations/implications

The “domain-analysis” concept has long been discussed and it could be addressed from different perspectives. A resume of these perspectives and an explanation of the approach followed in this experiment is included in the background section.

Originality/value

The authors propose an approach to identify the domain specificity of terms in large domain-specific terminologies and a criterion to measure the overall domain specificity of a knowledge organisation system, based on domain-experts analysis. The authors also provide a first insight about using automated measures to determine the degree to which a given term can be considered domain specific. The resulting data set from the domain-experts’ evaluation can be reused as a gold standard for further research about these automatic measures.

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Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

David W. Taylor and Antonella Reintano

The early literature on learning in small firms has been linked to individual learning through training. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of networks as a…

Abstract

The early literature on learning in small firms has been linked to individual learning through training. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of networks as a vehicle for learning through knowledge transfer. It is how this network‐learning takes place that this paper helps to elucidate. The focus in this paper is a particular ‘life or death’ decision point at Totti Industrie, a small religious clothing manufacturer in Calabria, Italy. A problem‐centred approach was adopted in order to assess how the owner‐manager learned to solve problems and ultimately arrive at a decision. Preliminary findings diverge from similar studies undertaken in the United Kingdom where networks are less extensive but utilised more completely to resolve business related problems. It is suggested that a more limited use of the wider network could be down to the intensity and vastness of network relations and the susceptibility of this wider‐network to leakage of valuable company information.

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EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Beat Hans Wafler and Yuosre F. Badir

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how two multinational companies (MNCs) faced the challenge of market uncertainty and political instability in a newly emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how two multinational companies (MNCs) faced the challenge of market uncertainty and political instability in a newly emerging market, and how it affected the impact of their product marketing strategy (PMS) and product (brand) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative longitudinal paired case study of a market entry by two global MNCs. Twelve global brands (products) were studied, which were locally manufactured and launched by the two MNCs during their first ten years of operation in Vietnam.

Findings

The authors approached the investigation from a conventional point of view: standardization versus adaptation. The results showed that in addition to these two traditional processes, a third one was also operating, which the authors labeled semi-adaptation, or the midway PMS. Semi-adaptation refers to a product that has been introduced to Vietnam from a neighboring country.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on two European MNCs active in the food and consumer-household goods industry in a newly emerging market: Vietnam.

Practical implications

This primary data indicate that the product standardization, semi-adaptation and adaptation process in practice is a technique applied to fit a product to a newly emerging market more by degree of change than by product category.

Originality/value

This paper supports a recent stream of research, which views Standardization or Adaptation as the two ends of the same continuum, where the degree of the firm’s PMS can range between them.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Milo R. Paich

Argues that many performance improvement programmes can be evaluated in the light of expected gains in customer retention, which in turn will improve profits. Customer…

Abstract

Argues that many performance improvement programmes can be evaluated in the light of expected gains in customer retention, which in turn will improve profits. Customer service transactions involve people who are supported by computers. Therefore, a performance improvement strategy will consider the ways in which people respond to people, and software responds to people. Yet in most organizations the software and human sides of service are managed ‐ and budgeted for ‐ at opposite ends of the building. When systems and people resources are polarized, the corporate strategy may look cohesive on paper but may be for all practical purposes a box of loose pieces. Presents the budget fusion idea which considers certain systems and people outlays as a unified investment in pursuit of a value‐added goal: retention of profitable customers.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2018

Vesna Pajić, Staša Vujičić Stanković, Ranka Stanković and Miloš Pajić

A hybrid approach is presented, which combines linguistic and statistical information to semi-automatically extract multiword term candidates from texts.

Abstract

Purpose

A hybrid approach is presented, which combines linguistic and statistical information to semi-automatically extract multiword term candidates from texts.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is designed to be domain and language independent, focusing on languages with rich morphology. Here, it is used for extracting multiword terms from texts in Serbian, belonging to the agricultural engineering domain, as a use case. Predefined syntactic structures were used for multiword terms. For each structure, a finite state transducer was developed, which recognizes text sequences having that structure and outputs the sequence in a normalized form, so that different inflectional forms of the same multiword term can be counted properly. Term candidates were further filtered by their frequencies and evaluated by two domain experts.

Findings

By using language resources, such as electronic dictionaries and grammars, 928 multiword terms were extracted out of 1,523 multiword terms that were recognized as candidates from a corpus having 42,260 different simple word forms; 870 of these were new, not already contained in the existing electronic dictionary of compounds for Serbian, and they were used to enrich the dictionary.

Originality/value

The paper presents methodology that can significantly contribute to the development of terminology lexicons in different areas. In this particular use case, some important agricultural engineering concepts were extracted from the text, but this approach could be used for other domains and languages as well.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Milos Nicic and Sanja Iguman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emerging practices of the “tourism of the ordinary” in the wider frame of post-socialist transformation of Serbia’s capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emerging practices of the “tourism of the ordinary” in the wider frame of post-socialist transformation of Serbia’s capital city – Belgrade. By sourcing the inspiration in cultural studies and classics of the studies of the ordinary, focus is directed to the patterns of tourism consumption of practices, places and people that do not fall in the category of tourism attraction. The attention is drawn to New Belgrade (Novi Beograd in Serbian), residential part of Belgrade built predominantly after the Second World War. New Belgrade lacks proper tourism infrastructure, commoditized attractions and consumerable tourism experiences on a large scale. Nevertheless, this part of the city is slowly becoming explored by tourists individually or in organized walking or cycling tours. Visits to New Belgrade are most often connected to alternative or hip visitors and have the allure of both urban exploration and cultural practice, as the tours are offered by specialist architectural organizations or individual guides. By introspecting the case of New Belgrade, this paper attempts to address the prospect that ordinary exist only in relation to the attraction and that its appeal comes from the fact that what is ordinary to someone is attraction to another.

Design/methodology/approach

As far as specific approach is concerned, some archival and librarian materials have been analyzed in order to map the territory that is being researched (New Belgrade) and to frame the significance of potential heritagisation (Harrison, 2013) on the built environment and its territory. Further, relevant websites and both primary and secondary resources have been consulted. This mostly refers to the websites of Tourist Organization of Belgrade (TOB) and the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments in Belgrade as two most relevant bodies connecting the urban fabric of the city and its tourism valorization.

Findings

In this paper, the authors have tried to demonstrate how tourism of the ordinary might be conducted in urban environment that lacks no tangible resources, whose physical physiognomies are not insignificant and which, in another, alternative tourism regime might be considered attractions. However, in the specific set of characteristics spanning from contested past to ambiguous contemporary valorization, New Belgrade remains an uncharted part of the city for much of the mainstream tourism, leaving its charms for very few visitors, most often engaged in interest of the “ordinary.”

Originality/value

Although Belgrade is experiencing steady rise in numbers regarding tourist arrivals, length of stay and on-site expenditure, New Belgrade is nowhere to be seen on the map of tourism offer, as per Belgrade’s Tourism Organization. TOB’s official web page, at the time this piece is written, in the section Attractions, mentions nothing regarding New Belgrade. Among 13 entries – 12 are historic sites of more than a century behind them and one is a lake and outdoor destination.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Vesna Damnjanovic, William Proud and Milos Milosavljevic

Management education has received an immense amount of attention from both scholars and practitioners in the last few decades. Most research efforts have aimed at…

Abstract

Purpose

Management education has received an immense amount of attention from both scholars and practitioners in the last few decades. Most research efforts have aimed at improving classroom education processes, programs and outcomes. Only a limited amount of research has focused on extracurricular activities such as mentoring top talented students for international business case competitions. This paper aims to examine the knowledge flow between mentors and strategic management undergraduates while they prepare for international business case competitions. This flow provides the opportunity for the development of phronetic skills, knowledge and leadership potential of undergraduates.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the flow, 55 mentors worldwide were examined to provide evidence of their mentoring practices, perceived development of undergraduates and reverse learning of the business schools' top talents. For the analysis, the study used partial least squares–structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that extracurricular mentoring of business case competitors strongly affects their development and creates recursive effects on the development of mentoring activities.

Research limitations/implications

Given the parsimony of mentors for premier global case study competitions, the findings of this study cannot easily be generalized to mentoring as such.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of the topics, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, a study of this kind has never been conducted before. For the construct of the authors’ model, the study was inspired by the multistage mentoring process theory.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Dani Milos

Higher degree by research (HDR) graduates are often perceived to be overly specialised and are unable to adapt to non-academic settings (Jaeger and Rudra, 2013)…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher degree by research (HDR) graduates are often perceived to be overly specialised and are unable to adapt to non-academic settings (Jaeger and Rudra, 2013). Universities are under increasing pressure to embed research and transferrable skills into the candidature in a flexible and meaningful way to equip graduates with the skills to succeed in a range of careers. The paper aims to study how Flinders University has embedded the Research and Employability Skills Training (REST) Program into the HDR.

Design/methodology/approach

REST was established to replace the workshop-based professional development program, with a structured, compulsory, comprehensive program for HDR students, based on the Vitae Researcher Development Framework (RDF). The Program aims to provide students with the research skills they need to complete their studies and the transferrable skills employers seek, through an online, supported program that helps them identify their needs, plan and control their skills development. Such a comprehensive online candidature management system has enabled Flinders to implement the RDF and successfully and comprehensively embed REST into the HDR candidature, assisting students to articulate and demonstrate their skills with documented evidence.

Findings

The Program has been running for one year, and so far, has been successful. Students are increasingly completing the initial online Skills Needs Analysis assessment component, which helps to identify their skills gaps and recommend workshops to meet their needs. Supervisors and students are engaging with the Program through structured discussion and refection of skills at each annual milestone, thanks to the help of the Inspire online candidature management system.

Originality/value

REST is a valuable resource for HDR students, providing them with a range of skills to progress with their research, writing and professional development training that complements, but is separate from, their degree. Providing a structured training program which follows and supports students’ candidature, and is based around the training needs and career trajectories of the student assists the students be more equipped and supported to complete on time and are well prepared for a range of career outcomes.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Sana Masmoudi Mardessi and Sonda Daoud Ben Arab

Enterprise risk management (ERM) has become an important subject of increasing interest among companies throughout the world. It is gaining global attention among risk…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise risk management (ERM) has become an important subject of increasing interest among companies throughout the world. It is gaining global attention among risk management professionals and academics. However, little is known about the extent of ERM implementation in the Tunisian context. More importantly, there are limited studies in literature that examine the determinants of this implementation. The purpose of this study is threefold, to propose an index to measure the level of ERM implementation, to examine the level of ERM implementation in Tunisian companies and to propose a conceptual framework for the determinants of this implementation. From the review of literature, several factors are found to be determinants of ERM implementation. Such factors are the presence of a Chief Risk Officer, the appointment of an internal auditor, the type of industry and the firm size.

Design/methodology/approach

To further understand the relation between ERM implementation and its determinants, a questionnaire survey was conducted in 2016 and administrated to 80 companies. Respondents were CRO and more often internal auditors or financial directors. Other data were collected from annual reports and notes to the financial statements. Along with this, the ordinal regression was applied to test the dependence between ERM implementation and its determinants.

Findings

Based on the data gathered, Tunisian companies have shown an increasing interest in risk management in the post-revolution context; however, an integrated approach of ERM implementation is still at an early stage. Descriptive statistics suggest that ERM is essentially developed in financial institutions, especially in banks and some large companies operating in non- financial industries. With regard to the multivariate regression results, the level of ERM implementation is positively related to the presence of a Chief Risk Officer, internal auditor, the type of industry and the firm size.

Originality/value

This study attempts to contribute to the risk management literature in two ways. Conceptually, this study proposes an ERM index to assess the level of ERM implementation. Empirically, it provides some empirical evidence that highlights factors which determine the level of ERM implementation. Therefore, this study will extend the scope of literature by providing novel empirical evidence by exploring the Tunisian context.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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