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1 – 10 of 14
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Millie Jackson, Ayse Gider, Celeste Feather, Kelly Smith, Amy Fry, Jamene Brooks‐Kieffer, Christopher D. Vidas and Rose Nelson

To keep librarians and colleagues informed about the issues and programs of the Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia on the Georgia…

1996

Abstract

Purpose

To keep librarians and colleagues informed about the issues and programs of the Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia on the Georgia Institute of Technology campus in February 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a review of the conference.

Findings

Acquisitions staff, catalogers, public service staff, administrators, IT personnel, information providers from the vendor side, content managers, and others all came together to assess what needs to be done to continue high servicing of both born digital and electronically available resources in a hybrid environment that continues to describe all library settings today. As the percentage of electronic resources quickly grows, there are new challenges in acquiring, caring for, servicing, preserving, using and citing them that keep librarians up at night to consider short‐and long‐term solutions in how they should be organized bibliometrically and how we can re‐engineer some of our procedures to best treat the wide range of e‐Resources now common in all libraries.

Originality value

The program blended services with processing reinforcing the importance of electronic resources for the “total” library environment. It seemed like there was nothing left out.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2008

Robin Champieux, Millie Jackson and Steven Carrico

The purpose of this paper is to describe the motivations, creation, and implementation of workflow and organizational redesigns within two academic library acquisitions…

2055

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the motivations, creation, and implementation of workflow and organizational redesigns within two academic library acquisitions departments: the University of Alabama (UA) and the University of Florida (UF).

Design/methodology/approach

Both institutions utilized a combination of goal identification, staff contribution, and Blackwell's workflow consulting services to build and implement new acquisitions workflows.

Findings

A comparison of the projects reveals two paths to conducting a reorganization of acquisitions in academic libraries, but with the same goal: doing more with less staff while promoting a more cost‐efficient model of operations.

Originality value

In evaluating these analysis projects at UA and UF, common successes that are applicable to future undertakings were identified.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Paulina V. Harper, Kyrille Goldbeck, Margaret Hogarth, David Greenebaum, David Magolis and Millie Jackson

To report on the 1st Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference held in March 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.Design/methodology/approach – Provides a review of some of the…

1689

Abstract

Purpose

To report on the 1st Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference held in March 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.Design/methodology/approach – Provides a review of some of the events of the conference.

Findings

The ER&L conference is the first step to building an shared understanding about the unique medium of electronic resources and management and developing a supportive community for dissemination of basic practices and latest developments in the field.

Originality/value

A conference report of interest to information management professionals, especially those involved with electronic resources.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Gina Costello, Christopher Cox, Alice L. Daugherty, Connie Haley, Millie Jackson, S.G. Ranti Junus and Fu Zhuo

To highlight content of interest to this journal’s readership that promotes current thinking and activities in Information Technology.

1094

Abstract

Purpose

To highlight content of interest to this journal’s readership that promotes current thinking and activities in Information Technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Selective conference report of the annual meeting of the American Library Association and pre‐conference.

Findings

The largest conference of librarians, the variety of programs, activities, exhibit halls, creates one of the best professional development opportunities for librarians. Attracting librarians from all sectors and work environments from around the globe, this conference is hard to describe in a brief way except to say it is an experience. The article documents relevant programs about information technology was the goal of this contribution.

Originaligy/value

Contains information of particular interest to readers who did not attend these sessions. Introducers them to presenters and important hot topics. Provides an alternative to not being present while gaining some information and coverage.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Tim Bateman

This article considers the use of Asbos as a response to problematic behaviour exhibited by children and young people under the age of 18 years. Drawing on research…

Abstract

This article considers the use of Asbos as a response to problematic behaviour exhibited by children and young people under the age of 18 years. Drawing on research conducted on behalf of the Youth Justice Board, it suggests that the perceptions of key professionals involved in the Asbo process may have a greater impact on their use than the level of anti‐social behaviour in an area.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Gareth James Young

To explore the way in which responses to urban disorder have become part of the anti-social behaviour (ASB herein) toolkit following the 2011 disorders in England. In…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the way in which responses to urban disorder have become part of the anti-social behaviour (ASB herein) toolkit following the 2011 disorders in England. In particular, the purpose of this paper is to unpack the government’s response to the riots through the use of eviction. It is argued that the boundaries of what constitutes ASB, and the geographical scope of the new powers, are being expanded resulting in a more pronounced unevenness of behaviour-control mechanisms being deployed across the housing tenures.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative research design, 30 in-depth interviews were undertaken with housing, ASB, and local police officers alongside a number of other practitioners working in related fields. These practitioners were based in communities across east London, the West Midlands and Greater Manchester. This was augmented with a desk-based analysis of key responses and reports from significant official bodies, third sector and housing organisations.

Findings

Findings from the research show that responses to the 2011 riots through housing and ASB-related mechanisms were disproportionate, resulting in a rarely occurring phenomenon being unnecessarily overinflated. This paper demonstrates, through the lens of the 2011 riots specifically, how the definition of ASB continues to be expanded, rather than concentrated, causing noticeable conflicts within governmental approaches to ASB post-2011.

Research limitations/implications

This research was undertaken as part of a PhD study and therefore constrained by financial and time implications. Another limitation is that the “riot-clause” being considered here has not yet been adopted in practice. Despite an element of supposition, understanding how the relevant authorities may use this power in the future is important nonetheless.

Originality/value

Much effort was expended by scholars to analyse the causes of the 2011 riots in an attempt to understand why people rioted and what this says about today’s society more broadly. Yet very little attention has been focused on particular legislative responses, such as the additional riot clause enacted through the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. This paper focuses on this particular response to explore more recent ways in which people face being criminalised through an expansion of behaviour defined as ASB.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2010

Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the…

17716

Abstract

Purpose

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the research methods used and analytical techniques that have been employed in order to provide a platform for future research in this important area.

Design/methodology/approach

The key method used is a literature review of all the available academic research into the social impacts of events on communities and the development of a model for future research.

Findings

After reviewing the social impact literature, the paper finds that one negative social impact, in particular, has the potential to undermine the key positive impacts that events can deliver for a host community. This impact, which is collectively known as anti‐social behaviour (ASB) incorporates behaviour such as drunken, rowdy and potentially life and property threatening behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The consequences of the impact of ASB are so serious, partly because it is an impact which the media often highlight, can seriously tarnish the image of an event in the eyes of the local community and reduce their pride in the destination. Community tourism leaders need to manage this impact in order to maintain resident support. The paper concludes with a model for future research into the social impacts of events on communities, focusing on the role that ASB plays in residents' perceptions of events.

Originality/value

This paper provides a review of the literature on social impacts to date and is a resource for researchers in the area. In addition, the paper highlights the role that ASB plays in aggravating negative perceptions of tourism in communities and the need for a more in‐depth understanding of ASB.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Eleanor Peters

Abstract

Details

The Use and Abuse of Music: Criminal Records
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-002-8

Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Robert Smith

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship in Policing and Criminal Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-056-6

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