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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Hendrik A. Baert

States that the continuing structural disequilibrium in the marketing of milk and milk products is of concern in the EEC. Analyses the complex intervention mechanism…

Abstract

States that the continuing structural disequilibrium in the marketing of milk and milk products is of concern in the EEC. Analyses the complex intervention mechanism established by the commission for this market.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Mukund R. Dixit

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in…

Abstract

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in the case discussion are required to review the developments in the organisation and recommend a strategy for the future.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Jeremy Franks

In 1994, after 61 years, the UK’s Milk Marketing Boards were disbanded. One consequence, an increase in the variation of milk price paid to producers, is analysed here…

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Abstract

In 1994, after 61 years, the UK’s Milk Marketing Boards were disbanded. One consequence, an increase in the variation of milk price paid to producers, is analysed here. Initially most milk producers joined the farmer‐owned co‐operative Milk Marque, accepting lower milk prices (estimated here at about 1.5 ppl in the 1997 milk quota year). A second analysis shows that these farmers accepted this lower milk price because of Milk Marque’s perceived financial security, and to support the principle of co‐operative marketing which they believed would protect milk prices in the long run. Milk Marque was dismantled in 2000 principally because of its planned enlargement of vertically integrated processing capacity. This has left dairy farmers at another crossroads; their choices now will shape the development of the marketing of milk in England and Wales for the foreseeable future. These options are discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Fang Wang, Wojciech Kozlowski and Ming Ouyang

The purpose of this paper is to examine challenges and opportunities that occurred in the Polish ultra‐high temperature (UHT) milk market after Poland entered the European Union.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine challenges and opportunities that occurred in the Polish ultra‐high temperature (UHT) milk market after Poland entered the European Union.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an in‐depth analysis of the Polish UHT market and by interpreting statistical data, this paper analyzes the retailing, production, and distribution channels, branding, and potential changes in the marketing perspective of the UHT market in Poland. To understand the nature of the market, this paper employs a marketing science method, marketing persistence analysis, to explore the relationship of short‐term marketing efforts and long‐term market response in Polish UHT milk market.

Findings

Based on empirical testing of ten Polish brands, results show that the UHT milk market in Poland presents marketing persistence, which means that short‐term marketing efforts can generate long‐term revenue effects.

Research limitations/implications

If marketing spending data are available, causality tests can be performed to see what are most effective marketing means (e.g. TV advertising or sale promotion) in Polish dairy markets.

Practical implications

Combining the empirical findings with the facts that previous marketing activities in Poland are relatively low, and it is now a historic transition for Poland after joining the homogenous market of Europe, the authors suggest that existing marketers increase the marketing investment to strengthen brands, gain market share, and build long‐term customer relationships. International marketers also have good opportunities now to enter Polish UHT markets through intensive marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to apply marketing science techniques to examine the Polish market and the findings enable both academic researchers and industrial practitioners to understand this market better and explore its potential business opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sarah Kühl, Lea Schlüterbusch and Achim Spiller

Agricultural-related food marketing claims are gaining in importance. The challenge for the industry is to claim real production characteristics while being in line with…

Abstract

Purpose

Agricultural-related food marketing claims are gaining in importance. The challenge for the industry is to claim real production characteristics while being in line with consumers’ expectations. Looking at the example of marketing pasture-raised milk year-round and the fact that cows only have access to pasture in summer, the purpose of this paper is to analyse consumer expectations, the potential of deception and the acceptance of more credible marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

An online access panel was used for data collection. The data include 310 German milk buyers, who were grouped using cluster analysis to examine the different target groups for the year-round and seasonal marketing of pasture-raised milk.

Findings

The study distinguished two different consumer groups: one with lower expectations accepting year-round marketing (32.5 per cent) and the other with higher demands, who feel deceived by year-round marketing (46.7 per cent). Furthermore, one part of the last group is also sceptical towards the more precise seasonal marketing due to their general scepticism towards ag-related marketing claims.

Practical implications

To generate consumer trust in ag-related marketing claims, it is beneficial to meet consumers’ expectations. Producers have to decide if they orient their products to more modest or more critical consumer segments. While it is easier to implement lower standards, there is the risk to disappoint (and thereby lose) the most interesting target group of highly involved consumers characterised by some general doubts regarding food marketing claims.

Originality/value

The study is the first to demonstrate the existence of two consumer segments that differ in their expectations towards and acceptance of ag-related marketing claims for food products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

JOHN P. FORMBY and LOUIS AMATO

North Carolina is one of fourteen states directly regulating and controlling milk markets. The regulations are administratively complex and vary from state to state, but…

Abstract

North Carolina is one of fourteen states directly regulating and controlling milk markets. The regulations are administratively complex and vary from state to state, but the general pattern of regulation follows that set by the comprehensive Federal regulation which began in 1937 with the passage of the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act. Milk markets in most of the country, including the major producing regions, are regulated and controlled by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). As a result of both state and federal controls, virtually no markets are unregulated. The consequences of Federal regulation of milk markets have been studied intensively, notably by Kessel and more recently by Kwoka. Less is known about the form and effects of state regulation. In this paper we analyze the case of milk market regulation in North Carolina. Specifically, we (1) review the ongoing regulation and assess the market structure and conduct of market participants including regulators; (2) review and analyze the economic implications and legal developments in reconstituting milk; and (3) investigate the policy alternatives with the purpose of determining whether there are options which, if adopted, will generate more social gains than associated social losses.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Jeremy Franks

The recent background to the UK market for organic milk is reviewed to establish the background to the Organic Dairy Production: A Sustainable Future for Organic Dairying…

3529

Abstract

The recent background to the UK market for organic milk is reviewed to establish the background to the Organic Dairy Production: A Sustainable Future for Organic Dairying conference held in March 2002. The presentations given at that conference are critically reviewed. Several of arguably the most important determinants of the sustainable future of organic dairying did not find their full expression at that conference. Issues largely or wholly excluded include: a priori evidence for expecting a higher level of co‐operation among organic than conventional farmers; the distinction between “competitive pricing” and “sustainable pricing”; import penetration and substitution, and post‐conversion subsidies; utilising innovative information technologies to “tell the organic story”; policing organic standards and traceability; and the ownership of the “organic label” and the number of organic standard bodies. The importance of these issues is shown by reference to the current market situation for organic milk in the UK. There is a need for considerable developments in the marketing of organic milk. More distance must be placed between associations that campaign for market growth and an organisation that will need to be appointed to take responsibility for providing reliable and impartial market‐based information.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

John Jones

The UK dairy industry is seriously under threat from imports andalready contributes significantly to the country′s food trade deficit.“Food from Britain” blames this…

Abstract

The UK dairy industry is seriously under threat from imports and already contributes significantly to the country′s food trade deficit. “Food from Britain” blames this shortfall on the restrictions made on supply by milk quota. Suggests that the pricing structure for milk and the monopoly of the Milk Marketing Board are also significant contributory factors. “Food from Britain” champions, among others, increased exports of British cheeses and premium butter products for the home market, to help to redress the balance. Promar International researchers feel that processors would be better advised to concentrate on other types of added‐value dairy products for home and abroad. Discusses the proposals for change at the MMB, countered by a suggestion that only a system of regional competitive co‐operatives would ensure a genuinely free market for the purchase and sale of milk. Without dramatic changes in the structure of supply, allocation systems and pricing of milk it is likely that UK companies will continue to be overrun by imports, while finding it increasingly difficult to penetrate the European market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Jeremy Franks and Sarah Hauser

When the UK's Milk Marketing Boards (MMB) were disbanded in 1994 the formal link between the farm gate milk price with the milk's end‐use was broken. The purpose of this…

1436

Abstract

Purpose

When the UK's Milk Marketing Boards (MMB) were disbanded in 1994 the formal link between the farm gate milk price with the milk's end‐use was broken. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether milk prices fell to their “marginal value in the least remunerative use” or whether “the market had put in place some other mechanism for raising the price upwards”.

Design/methodology/approach

An on‐line survey of UK milk producers, open to all, conducted in the summer of 2008, explored farmers' knowledge of their milk contract, the use of their milk, and the reasons for choosing their current milk buyer.

Findings

A liquid milk price premium (of 1.06ppl.) was earned by farmers who: sold on liquid milk contracts to processors, rather than to one of the three large farmer‐owned co‐operatives; and who recently switched milk buyer. Switching incurred high transaction costs, additional uncertainty, and went against commitments to the co‐operative ideal.

Practical implications

Publication of differences between a buyer's milk price and a benchmark related to how the milk is processed, (a D‐score), cumulative difference values (D_C), 12 and 24 monthly moving average difference measures (D_MA12 and D_MA24 respectively) alongside milk buyers' milk price would improved supply chain transparency, and lower farmers' switching costs. It would also help farmers to treat their milk's final markets, rather than their milk buyer, as their customers.

Originality/value

The paper puts forward practical suggestions that have never been discussed by the UK supply chain, even though they would have direct and indirect benefits to the actors involved.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Joan P. Alcock

The Milk Marketing Boards were established in 1933 in order to ensure aregular collection of milk from farmers and a reliable delivery of milkto customers. They perfected…

666

Abstract

The Milk Marketing Boards were established in 1933 in order to ensure a regular collection of milk from farmers and a reliable delivery of milk to customers. They perfected a distribution system which proved its worth in the Second World War by ensuring an essential supply of milk under difficult circumstances. In 1993, the Government proposed that the English Milk Marketing Board should become a voluntary co‐operative with the title Milk Marque. This would make its own arrangements for the collection of milk from farmers and would compete with dairy companies such as Nestle and Northern Foods as farmers would be able to make their own arrangements over milk collection and milk products. The new system was to be in place by 1 April. Because of objections, any decisions have been postponed until 1 October or beyond.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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