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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

John C. Dexter

Upon discharge, US service members experience an instantaneous immersion back into civilian life. One of the most challenging aspects of that reimmersion is the…

Abstract

Purpose

Upon discharge, US service members experience an instantaneous immersion back into civilian life. One of the most challenging aspects of that reimmersion is the reentry/entry into the civilian workforce. As such, it is necessary to study the returning veteran's employment experience when considering the veteran's civilian reintegration. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the returning veteran's civilian employment experience and to identify challenges faced by the veteran in the civilian onboarding experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a qualitative analysis in which 27 military veterans were interviewed about their experience with civilian reemployment. The results of the interviews were compiled, analyzed and grouped by common theme. This study explains some of the major issues confronted by the newly separated veteran and discusses how those challenges may influence job satisfaction and job performance.

Findings

The analysis identified the following three main themes that posed challenges to the veteran to civilian employment transition: civilian employer’s military job knowledge deficit, veteran anxiety with civilian employer’s lack of clearly defined new-hire processes and civilian employer misunderstanding of veteran compensation, benefits and family involvement expectations.

Research limitations/implications

This study is beneficial to scholars in as much as it will help to more clearly identify literature gaps, provide direction on emerging research concepts, add to the existing literature on the veteran to civilian transitions and connect research areas that have not yet been adequately studied. Future research would be well served to follow a similar program of research but by employing different research methods in order to address the limitations outlined above and further support the findings of this research. Specifically, future research should sample across a wider set of individuals as study participants (time since discharge, age, military rank at time of separation, reserve status, etc.). By doing this, future researchers may be able to determine how perceptions change over time and with regard to military experience. A second area of future research may be to conduct related research based on civilian employment opportunities and qualifications. Specific areas of study to be considered should be focused primarily on the macro issues such as military leadership and translating military experiences and skill sets to civilian contexts. Unlike other findings in this research, these two areas cannot be affected at the organizational level, and as such require concept exploration and clarity.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance and direction for veterans and employers alike by outlining areas that may be challenging for new-hire military veterans and bringing to light areas where the civilian onboarding experience can improve to better accommodate veterans. Further, this study identifies areas that directly or indirectly contribute to high veteran turnover rates and ultimately high veteran unemployment rates.

Originality/value

This original quantitative study conducted by the author specifically identifies several areas in the veteran to civilian employment transition that pose challenges for the returning veteran. All data for this study were gathered and analyzed using first-hand face-to-face interviews and established data analysis methods by the researcher.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Hyunjoon Lim

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of veteran status on civilian wages and on retirement age through employing individual-level data.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of veteran status on civilian wages and on retirement age through employing individual-level data.

Design/methodology/approach

Instrumental variable (IV) estimation specifications show that, contrary to public perception, veteran status has a statistically significant positive impact on an individual’s civilian wage and thus helps him retire earlier than his non-veteran counterpart.

Findings

Moreover, the wage premium effect largely holds for less-educated men; however, for highly educated men, military service has adverse effects on their subsequent wages, and thus, on their retirement age. In line with this result, the effects of veteran status on retirement age largely hold for the relatively less-educated group.

Originality/value

This is the first finding to shed light on the link between veteran status and the decision to retire. This work is also first attempt to explore relationship between compulsory military service and subsequent civilian labor market performance, using the Korean individual-level data via relevant IV estimation methodology.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Sara Kintzle and Carl A. Castro

The transition from military service to civilian employment is one of the most important factors related to post-service well-being and success. It is also one of the…

Abstract

The transition from military service to civilian employment is one of the most important factors related to post-service well-being and success. It is also one of the biggest challenges. The majority of veterans describe finding a job as the greatest challenge in transitioning to civilian life. While research has demonstrated a number of contributory factors related to difficulty in finding employment, a conceptual framework for understanding such challenges has yet to be proposed. Military transition theory describes the progression through which service members’ transition out of the military and illustrates how certain factors may create susceptibility to negative transition outcomes. The purpose of this chapter is to utilize the military transition theory to provide a foundation for understanding the factors related to successful transition to the civilian workplace after military separation.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Pauline A. Howes

Company programs to hire military veterans and Olympic athletes represent a convergence of responsibilities, interests, and opportunities for human resources (HR) and…

Abstract

Company programs to hire military veterans and Olympic athletes represent a convergence of responsibilities, interests, and opportunities for human resources (HR) and public relations (PR) staffs. These employment initiatives often reflect corporate social responsibility (CSR) values as well as business goals. This chapter explores why companies create special hiring programs, how they are integrated into an HR function, and the role of PR in communicating about the program as part of a socially responsible mission. Though distinctive in their roles – HR in managing corporate staffing and PR in shaping a company’s image and promoting its brands – these two functions can jointly amplify the value and impact of special hiring programs.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Soldiers on International Missions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-032-6

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Nick Beech, Jeff Gold and Susan Beech

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an understanding of how veterans see themselves in a civilian world, their ability to re-conceptualise and realign their perspective on life to support their transition in to a civilian world.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by Ricoeur’s theory of narrative identity, the work provides a qualitative analysis data from coaching interviews with five veterans.

Findings

The findings revealed the on-going legacy of military life and how its distinctiveness and belief centred on kinship shapes personal identity and the way they see their civilian world. The work sheds light on to the benefits of this Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach and how it can be used to provide a deeper insight in to the nature of personal transitions and how narrative can be used to expose complexities of the narratives of personal history and meaning as the narrator becomes both the seeker and what is sought.

Practical implications

The work reinforces the value of Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach identifying narrative mediating between two “poles” of identity and the act of mimesis; prefiguration, configuration and refiguration as veterans project stories of their world and their place within it.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights in to the importance of narrative identify broadening its potential application with engagement across diverse communities, thereby providing depth and rigour of its conceptual understanding of personal identify. The work further provides insights in to the challenges facing veterans to integrate within a civilian society.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Edward Fraser

A significant minority of veterans have poor mental health outcomes but their needs are not always well managed by the NHS. The purpose of this paper is to explore veterans

Abstract

Purpose

A significant minority of veterans have poor mental health outcomes but their needs are not always well managed by the NHS. The purpose of this paper is to explore veterans’ experiences of NHS mental healthcare in Norfolk and Suffolk to identify ways of improving services.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 30 veterans. Template analysis was undertaken to explore key themes in the interview transcripts.

Findings

Participants were reluctant to seek help but were more likely to engage with a veteran-specific service. Those whose symptoms were military related reported better experiences when accessing treatment that was military sensitive.

Research limitations/implications

This was a local study and the findings do not necessarily reflect the views of the wider veteran community. Most participants who received military sensitive treatment were referred to the study by NHS providers, which could account for their positive feedback.

Social implications

The development of dedicated mental health services may encourage more veterans to seek support, helping to improve patient outcomes. There is a need for further research to determine the effectiveness of dedicated services and identify how they should be deployed.

Originality/value

Where academic interest has generally centred on the aetiology of mental health conditions within the military, this study focussed upon service user experience. The findings contributed to NHS England’s recent decision to extend its network of dedicated services in 12 areas of the country to cover veterans across England from April 2017.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper concentrates on the transition experiences of recent military veterans into civilian employment. The interview-based results revealed that, firstly, veterans were struck by civilian employers' lack of knowledge about military jobs and skills. Secondly, the comparatively loose hiring and training processes experienced in civilian firms were a source of anxiety and frustration for military veterans. Thirdly, civilian employers clearly didn't understand the significantly different military compensation and benefits structure, nor the high level of family involvement in military life. Consequently, these civilian employers were deemed to possess little context around the environments these veterans were joining from.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Gemma Parry, Suzanne Margaret Hodge and Alan Barrett

Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among UK veterans is higher than in the general population. However, prevalence figures do not reflect the complexity…

Abstract

Purpose

Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among UK veterans is higher than in the general population. However, prevalence figures do not reflect the complexity of this phenomenon and ways in which it may be bound up with veterans’ experiences of adjusting to civilian life. The purpose of this study is to explore veterans’ experiences of successfully managing PTSD.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six veterans who had served in the UK armed forces and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Three themes were developed: accepting the problem, taking responsibility and gaining control; talking to the right people; and strategies, antidotes and circling back around. Managing PTSD appeared to be bound up with veterans’ experience of renegotiating their identity, where positive aspects of identity lost on leaving the military were rebuilt and problematic aspects were challenged. Participants sought to speak about their difficulties with others who understood the military context. They felt that their experiences made them a valuable resource to others, and they connected this with a positive sense of identity and value.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the importance of wider provision of peer support and education for civilian health services on veterans’ needs.

Originality/value

This study adds to the understanding of what meaningful recovery from PTSD may involve for veterans, in particular its potential interconnectedness with the process of adjusting to civilian life.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2018

Catherine Ward

Due to the country’s most recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and the enactment of the Post 9/11 GI Bill, colleges and universities across the United States have…

Abstract

Due to the country’s most recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and the enactment of the Post 9/11 GI Bill, colleges and universities across the United States have experienced a remarkable increase in student veteran enrollment. As a result, many college campuses have been challenged with knowing how to effectively support veterans as they transition from military life to college life. Although there is notable good intention, this challenge can impact an institution’s ability to offer adequate support. Consequently, many student veterans remain at the margins of the college experience, often affected by their distinct circumstances and a campus that may not be fully prepared to support them. This is a matter of equity and inclusion at its core. Students who are not well understood are likely to be underrepresented and underserved. Therefore, veterans must be included in the equity and inclusion conversation. A review of the literature confirms that student veteran support must involve a greater understanding of the student veteran experience, address institutional barriers to access, replace deficit models of support with more equitable practices, and challenge the dominant paradigm of student success that overemphasizes students’ individual and group characteristics and overlooks the role educators play in student achievement.

Details

Perspectives on Diverse Student Identities in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-053-6

Keywords

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