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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Stephen M. Rutner, Maria Aviles and Scott Cox

This paper aims to look at the relative position of thought leadership between the areas of military and civilian logisticians.

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3854

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the relative position of thought leadership between the areas of military and civilian logisticians.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a theoretical framework in an exploratory study using the literature to evaluate the constraints on the military side of logistics thought.

Findings

The discussion identifies challenges that may preclude military logistics thought from becoming the leaders for the foreseeable future.

Originality/value

The paper provides an examination of the changing role between military and civilian logistics that has not been carefully examined since just after the Gulf War in 1991.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Michael A. McGinnis

During the last 30 years the environments faced by the businesslogistics manager have dramatically increased in complexity. Theintegration of logistics processes with…

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5886

Abstract

During the last 30 years the environments faced by the business logistics manager have dramatically increased in complexity. The integration of logistics processes with organizational strategy, increasing complexities of partnership/channel relationships, and the increasingly international scope of business logistics processes are examples of these complexities. The military logistics literature addresses complex issues of integrating logistics with strategy and tactics; co‐ordinating world wide supply operations; co‐ordinating an industrial base with military needs; and managing cycles of mobilization, warfare, and demobilization. Summarizes the development of business logistics thought, reviews the military logistics literature, and develops insights from the said literature that appear relevant to business logistics thought.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Andreas Glas, Erik Hofmann and Michael Eßig

The purpose of this research is to analyse military logistics providing a decision support instrument for contracting in defence supply chains.

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2322

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyse military logistics providing a decision support instrument for contracting in defence supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This instrument – the Performance‐Based Logistics (PBL) portfolio – is developed following the contingency approach. Qualitative interviews and illustrative examples from Germany, Austria and Switzerland are used to validate the portfolio.

Findings

The proposed portfolio examines a military demand in respect of its required effectiveness (robustness and resilience), and the suppliers' ability to influence efficiency (forecast and supply risk). In combination, the contingencies are used to recommend three alternative types of PBL contracting.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on conceptual work with illustrative case examples. Therefore, although the authors believe that the PBL portfolio provides useful guidance for further research, the empirical applicability of this instrument must be proven.

Originality/value

The research on PBL is gaining importance, but still there remains a deficiency of theoretical grounding and management instruments. This study is a first approach to use the contingency framework for developing such an instrument. The value of the PBL portfolio lies in supporting normative decision making for contracting military supply.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Graham Heaslip and Elizabeth Barber

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a greater understanding of the challenges of civil military logistical cooperation, coordination and collaboration in…

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3228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a greater understanding of the challenges of civil military logistical cooperation, coordination and collaboration in humanitarian relief logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review of academic journals.

Findings

This paper has four main findings. First, a categorisation of humanitarian logistics literature is achieved through a systematic review. Second, a classification of military involvement in humanitarian relief logistics is presented. Third, the research substantiated systematic differences in the kinds of military cooperation not only due to stage of operations but also depending upon whether the disaster is “natural” or “manmade”. Fourth, the research identifies the challenges of civil military logistical cooperation, coordination and collaboration and posits recommendations to overcome the identified challenges.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an exploratory study and provides the basis for further research on cooperation, coordination and collaboration between military and civilian agencies in humanitarian operations. The paper sets a research agenda for academics.

Practical implications

This paper is the first to offer practical guidance to military commanders and managers of humanitarian agencies on solutions and recommendations to overcome the challenges to civil military logistical cooperation/coordination in humanitarian operations.

Originality/value

The area of civil military logistical cooperation/coordination has received limited consideration within the humanitarian aid logistics literature to date. This paper is designed to redress this shortfall. As a result, it is hoped that it will act as a catalyst for further research and to widen and deepen the resultant debate with a view to improving the outcome for those affected by current and future disasters.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

George A. Zsidisin, Amanda Bresler, Ben Hazen, Keith F. Snider and Taylor H. Wilkerson

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight on high-interest areas of research in defense-related logistics and supply chain management and opportunities for advancing…

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1282

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight on high-interest areas of research in defense-related logistics and supply chain management and opportunities for advancing theory and practice in this domain.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel of experts provided their insight to several questions oriented toward examining research opportunities and gaps in defense logistics research at the 2018 Academic Research Symposium of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals annual conference on September 30, 2018.

Findings

Three overarching themes emerged from the panel discussion for advancing theory and practice in defense logistics and supply chain management, which are developing a central repository, creating publication opportunities and integrating research practice and knowledge with the greater academic community.

Originality/value

Logistics and supply chain research is critical for advancing knowledge and practice in the military, as well as industrial settings. The intention in this manuscript is to provide scholars and practitioners in both settings greater awareness and potential avenues for developing synergies and processes for advancing logistics and supply chain research.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Keenan D. Yoho, Sebastiaan Rietjens and Peter Tatham

The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the special issue on defence logistics. To achieve this, an overview of the field of defence logistics is…

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3619

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the special issue on defence logistics. To achieve this, an overview of the field of defence logistics is offered together with a discussion of the historical and contemporary issues that have confronted researchers and practitioners. Current research is described, and a research agenda for future work in the field is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based upon a conceptual discussion of defence logistics as it has been studied in the past and is being studied in the present, and a reflection on the ways in which past research can usefully inform future research agendas.

Findings

The paper discusses the current state of defence logistics research, and proposes a research agenda for future work based upon the anticipated characteristics of future combat operations.

Research limitations/implications

A future research agenda is proposed that is informed by recent transformations in the conduct of warfare, as well as through anticipated changes in the global strategic landscape. Comparisons are made between defence logistics operations and their commercial counterparts to illustrate where there may be opportunities for adaptation based on the underlying similarities.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the major threads and themes of defence logistics research as a discipline, highlights the changing landscape of conflict in the 21st century and provides a future research agenda for those working in the field.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Jouni Juntunen, Mari Juntunen and Vesa Autere

The aim of this research is to reveal the security‐related outsourcing strategies of the public sector and the military and the relevant logistics outcomes by examining…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to reveal the security‐related outsourcing strategies of the public sector and the military and the relevant logistics outcomes by examining buying tactics.

Design/methodology/approach

A tentative model was devised from theoretical literature of how buyers use their negotiating power and relationships to achieve improved service quality and/or unit‐cost reductions. The model was tested using survey data from 149 respondents from the Finnish Defence Forces, and the public sector and industrial firms in Finland via structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Contrary to the approach of classic economics, where negotiating power correlates with direct costs, the findings indicate that negotiating power and relationships do not affect direct costs in the public sector and military contexts, but rather that negotiating power and relationships correlate with an improved service level, which consequently decreases the indirect logistics costs.

Research limitations/implications

By focusing on improvement in services in terms of their logistics service purchasing, the buyers reveal that their outsourcing strategy involves vertical outsourcing. The data are collected from one country, which may cause bias. Further studies would be required to test this research proposal in other countries.

Practical implications

To obtain cost reductions, buyers of logistics services could learn from the public sector and the military on how to use negotiating power and relationships to obtain better service instead of short‐term cost reductions, as better service correlates with reduced costs in the long run.

Originality/value

This study is important to practitioners as well as academics since there is little quantitative research available regarding strategic outsourcing modes and outcomes of adopting different modes.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Christiaan Davids, Robert Beeres and Paul C. van Fenema

This paper aims to present a study on the organization of military logistics under “hot” conditions in an expeditionary crisis response operation. The authors' main…

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2311

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a study on the organization of military logistics under “hot” conditions in an expeditionary crisis response operation. The authors' main research question is: in what way is armed forces logistics sourcing organized in the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer their research question, the authors conducted a case study including field research at military sites in Afghanistan. The case study is focused on military organizations that operate in a hostile and ambiguous environment. The authors compare sourcing of three categories of support services, i.e. facilities management, maintenance & logistics and security.

Findings

The authors' results include a systematic overview of the organization of command, logistic and accounting (sourcing) in the ISAF mission, involving multinational military partners and contractors. Second, the authors show how Canada, NATO, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the USA sourced the three categories of services mentioned in terms of sourcing profiles. Focusing on contracting, the authors outline which strategies NATO and the countries mentioned used in practice. And finally, differences and similarities are highlighted in the area of funding and accounting.

Research limitations/implications

While the authors' study provides insight in the use of sourcing profiles identified in this paper, more research is necessary to identify criteria for explaining sourcing decisions of armed forces.

Practical implications

The paper provides a systematic overview for practitioners and scholars and enhances manageability and policy development relevant for those who prepare, execute, monitor and evaluate missions.

Originality/value

The authors' paper is one of the first to provide a systematic overview in operational defense sourcing relying on first‐hand field data. This area of study is fragmented and remains mostly closed for non‐military researchers.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Elvira Kaneberg

The purpose of this paper is to analyse supply chain network management (SCNM) in the context of emergency preparedness management (EPM). The results of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse supply chain network management (SCNM) in the context of emergency preparedness management (EPM). The results of this study revealed that civil-military relations are essential for EPM to function as a coordinated approach to safety and security, and are necessary to respond effectively to complex emergencies and mitigating threats to developed countries. Civil-military relations are still a concern in the context of communication, the exercise of authority, and the coordination of emergency supplies (ES) to emergency operations.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on field observations, with attention focused on the EPM of Sweden, Finland, and Poland. The analysis of a broader SCNM through EPM was supported by semi-structured interviews among civil-military actors in Sweden, information collected from informal conversations known as “hanging out”, and secondary materials. Empirically, the analysis included a variety of civil-military relationships and identified implications for management, policy, and planning that are applicable to developed countries.

Findings

The management of civil-military relations is a meaningful resource when used as an overall approach for safety and security. The integration of civil-military relations in EPM in the planning of ES is a long-standing and complex matter. The management of Swedish civil-military relations in EPM is recognising that implications for management are imbedded in continuous policy changes in, for example, the Swedish policy history. Civil-military relational complications that arise in the field of operations are impossible to anticipate during emergency planning, as those complications are grounded in policy changes.

Originality/value

Escalating threats to developed countries are highlighted. The study underlines the primary measures used in studying military involvement in EPM. An understanding of SCNM as a choice for management can be obtained in future research that focuses on a broader role of the military in EPM. Sweden has emphasised a clearer role for the military by reactivating total defence planning and by evolving common practices and processes with civil actors in civil defence. Meanwhile, Poland and Finland are increasing their focus on supporting the management of civil-military policies on safety and security regarding communication, authority, and developing coordination. Consistent with findings from previous reports on SCNM, civil-military relations are essential for EPM. This study confirmed the importance of civil-military coordination, the management and practice of authority, and shared forms of communication.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Alan Carroll and Jens Neu

This paper aims to develop the tentative hypothesis that common effective dynamics generate asymmetry volatility and unpredictability in the business, military and…

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2388

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop the tentative hypothesis that common effective dynamics generate asymmetry volatility and unpredictability in the business, military and humanitarian logistics sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines collaborative supply chain management (CSCM) concepts which integrate practical comparator cases to develop and justify the theoretical framework.

Findings

The humanitarian logistics sector can take “best practice” from business and military LSCM developments, but has specific problems of potential instability which require sector‐specific attention.

Research limitations/implications

Humanitarian logistics' “present state” is a zero sum model because of the fragmented nature and number of disparate actors, which generate the logistics system volatility, unpredictability and asymmetry common to unstable operations, and which formed the research rationale for this paper.

Practical implications

The development gap identified can be resolved, and synthesis achieved, with the application of an intelligent system infrastructure.

Originality/value

This paper provides a development framework for a comprehensive set of universal techniques and a commonality in humanitarian logistics and supply chain management.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000