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Article

Jie Jian, Milin Wang, Lvcheng Li, Jiafu Su and Tianxiang Huang

Selecting suitable and competent partners is an important prerequisite to improve the performance of collaborative product innovation (CPI). The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Selecting suitable and competent partners is an important prerequisite to improve the performance of collaborative product innovation (CPI). The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated multi-criteria approach and a decision optimization model of partner selection for CPI from the perspective of knowledge collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the criteria for partner selection are presented, considering comprehensively the knowledge matching degree of the candidates, the knowledge collaborative performance among the candidates, and the overall expected revenue of the CPI alliance. Then, a quantitative method based on the vector space model and the synergetic matrix method is proposed to obtain a comprehensive performance of candidates. Furthermore, a multi-objective optimization model is developed to select desirable partners. Considering the model is a NP-hard problem, a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II is developed to solve the multi-objective optimization model of partner selection.

Findings

A real case is analyzed to verify the feasibility and validity of the proposed model. The findings show that the proposed model can efficiently select excellent partners with the desired comprehensive attributes for the formation of a CPI alliance.

Originality/value

Theoretically, a novel method and approach to partner selection for CPI alliances from a knowledge collaboration perspective is proposed in this study. In practice, this paper also provides companies with a decision support and reference for partner selection in CPI alliances establishment.

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Article

Marco O. Bertelli, Michele Rossi, Roberto Keller and Stefano Lassi

The management of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) requires a multimodal approach of behavioural, educational and pharmacological treatments. At present…

Abstract

Purpose

The management of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) requires a multimodal approach of behavioural, educational and pharmacological treatments. At present, there are no available drugs to treat the core symptoms of ASDs and therefore a wide range of psychotropic medications are used in the management of problems behaviours, co-occurring psychiatric disorders and other associated features. The purpose of this paper is to map the literature on pharmacological treatment in persons with ASD in order to identify those most commonly used, choice criteria, and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic mapping of the recent literature was undertaken on the basis of the following questions: What are the most frequently used psychoactive compounds in ASD? What are the criteria guiding the choice of a specific compound? How effective and safe is every psychoactive drug used in ASD? The literature search was conducted through search engines available on Medline, Medmatrix, NHS Evidence, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library.

Findings

Many psychotropic medications have been studied in ASDs, but few have strong evidence to support their use. Most commonly prescribed medications, in order of frequency, are antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants and stimulants, many of them without definitive studies guiding their usage. Recent animal studies can be useful models for understanding the common pathogenic pathways leading to ASDs, and have the potential to offer new biologically focused treatment options.

Originality/value

This is a practice review paper applying recent evidence from the literature.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article

Sarah N. Keller and Timothy Wilkinson

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were administered at baseline (n = 224) and six months post-test (n = 217), consisting of the Risk Behavior Diagnosis scale; self-report questions on suicidality; willingness to engage with suicide prevention resources; and willingness to communicate with peers, family members, teachers or counselors about suicide.

Findings

A comparison of means within groups from pre- to post-test showed increases in self-efficacy for communicating about suicidal concerns with a teacher, school counselor or social worker; increases in self-efficacy for helping others; and increases in response-efficacy of interpersonal communication about suicide with a teacher, school counselor or social worker.

Practical implications

Young adults need to be willing and able to intervene in life-threatening situations affecting their peers. In step with narrative empowerment education, personal experiences can be used to communicatively reduce peer resistance to behavior change.

Originality/value

Health communicators tend to rely on overly didactic education and awareness-raising when addressing suicide prevention. This research shows the importance of direct and personal forms of influence advocated by social marketing professionals.

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Article

Ketsuree Vijaranakorn and Randall Shannon

This study aims to develop a theoretical concept by examining the country image effects on luxury value perception, a matter past studies have overlooked. Multiple facets…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a theoretical concept by examining the country image effects on luxury value perception, a matter past studies have overlooked. Multiple facets of country image, cognitive and affective dimensions, have been developed to evaluate perceived luxury value and purchase intention. However, no prior studies have considered all the types of perceived luxury values: utilitarian value, hedonic value, symbolic value and economic value, considered in relation to cognitive and affective country image in an emerging country’s market. Accordingly, this study has attempted to explore the ways Thai luxury consumers perceive the image of the country and the influence of the perceived value of Thai luxury brands, to learn which country attributes strengthen the luxury brand’s value and customers’ purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 407 Thai respondents, who were luxury-product consumers who knew and previously had bought either Thai luxury brands or global luxury brands, comprised the final sample examined. Structural Equation Modeling was employed in this research to test the research hypotheses. The structural model proposed a causal relationship between two endogenous constructs, cognitive and affective country images, and five exogenous constructs: utilitarian value, hedonic value, symbolic value, economic value and purchase intention.

Findings

The findings confirmed that countries are like brands in that the perceived image of each country’s aspects, cognitive and affective, influences the perceived value in each dimension differently, and so affects purchase intention. This implies that the evaluation of perceived quality or perceived value for money, as in past studies, cannot accurately demonstrate what particular benefits consumers receive when they utilize the country-image cue. Country image has both symbolic and emotional significances for consumers. The findings have provided a more precise measure of the effects of country image as well as important information on country positioning the in the world market.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations in this study. The reliance on Thai samples from one city has limited the generalizability of the findings. Moreover, this study considered only one country of brand origin, and only one product category has been chosen as the stimulus, which together are the major limitations of this study. Future research could also consider further testing country image effects on value perception with other extrinsic attributes, rather than using a single cue, as this study did. Additionally, antecedent variables that may have an influence on country-image effects should be considered in future studies.

Practical implications

The relation of country image and value perception could help both governments and companies support their national brands more effectively, or to export products in accordance with the image aspect that most strongly impacts consumers’ positive perception of value. Moreover, it would be valuable for companies producing luxury products to know which country attributes strengthen the brand’s value. Luxury-brand managers will have to take these aspects into consideration when developing their communications strategies (Krupka et al., 2014).

Originality/value

There is a lack of research as regards the impact of a brand name’s perceived origin on the luxury perception associated with that brand (Salciuviene et al., 2010). This research is the first to investigate the theoretical framework of luxury value perception found in relation to cognitive and affective country images. From an academic perspective, this study sought to increase the theoretical research relating to the ambiguous conceptualization of the country-image effect on consumers’ perception of value in luxury products. Additionally, the relation of country image to luxury value perception could help both governments and companies support their national luxury brands more effectively, or to export luxury products in accordance with the image aspect that most strongly impacts consumers’ positive perception of value.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article

Yuhan Li, Xiaolin Mu, Haiting Kong, Hongchun Pan and Hong Liu

In view of the current difficulty of separation of troxerutin, the purpose of the paper is to separate and purify semi-synthetic flavonoid compound troxerutin by…

Abstract

Purpose

In view of the current difficulty of separation of troxerutin, the purpose of the paper is to separate and purify semi-synthetic flavonoid compound troxerutin by macroporous adsorption resin (SZ-3).

Design/methodology/approach

Comparing the adsorption performance and resolution of three different polar resins and choosing a resin to optimize the process parameters such as sample volume, eluent concentration and elution temperature to obtain high-purity troxerutin. After separating and enriching by resin column chromatography, detected the sample by LC-MS analysis.

Findings

This research found that the optimal conditions of the adsorption and desorption were sample volume S = 90 mg/g resin, methanol concentration C = 25%, T = 20 °C. the content of troxerutin increased significantly from 88% to more than 96%. Then confirmed the sample was troxerutin by LC-MS. In addition, the resin could be used for at least 10 cycles in the separation and purification experiments of troxerutin.

Originality/value

Purification of troxerutin with new SZ-3 resin for the first time. Under the optimal conditions, the purity and recovery of troxerutin was 96.4% and 39%. In this study, the authors established a purification process of troxerutin successfully that was simple, economical, environment friendly, with high purity and high recovery rate to provide a reference program for changing the status of troxerutin separation difficulties.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article

Davide Settembre Blundo, Fernando Enrique García Muiña, Alfonso Pedro Fernández del Hoyo, Maria Pia Riccardi and Anna Lucia Maramotti Politi

The purpose of this paper is to present alternative management practice methods for the cultural heritage sector apart from the traditional public support model. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present alternative management practice methods for the cultural heritage sector apart from the traditional public support model. These alternatives rely on sponsorship and patronage as well as the newer and more innovative public-private partnership (PPP).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is organized in two conceptual sections based on a literature review. The first section presents and compares two closely associated business strategy forms that are increasingly becoming popular within companies: sponsorship and patronage. These strategies are analyzed to show their advantages and disadvantages and are assessed based on their best uses in terms of the benefits from their implementation to all stakeholders involved (benefactors, recipients and the public) and, more particularly, to the benefactor’s company communication policy. The second section analyzes the PPP as a newer innovative practice in the cultural heritage sector, a recent development that has great potential, especially during an economic crisis where public funds are reduced, which risks the future recovery and proper maintenance of sites.

Findings

In the paper, the authors stressed that sponsorship, patronage and PPP are not merely alternative ways of primarily obtaining government funding for the cultural heritage sector but are also new strategic management practices that, when properly performed, will not only preserve and improve the sector but also allow more value to be distributed among all stakeholders.

Originality/value

Although the topic of PPP is treated fairly in the scientific literature, especially with regard to infrastructure, there are few cases of the application of this model to cultural heritage management.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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