Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Mikyoung Kim, Doori Song and Ahnlee Jang

Drawing upon attribution theory, this study aims to examine how different types of product information sources (mainstream celebrities vs micro-celebrities) interact with…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon attribution theory, this study aims to examine how different types of product information sources (mainstream celebrities vs micro-celebrities) interact with content type (experiential vs promotional) to influence consumer response toward native posts on social media (causal attributions and click intention).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 134 adult Twitter users participated in a 2 (source type: mainstream celebrity vs micro-celebrity) × 2 (content type: experiential vs promotional) between-subjects online experimental design.

Findings

Results showed that for experiential native advertising, messages from a micro-celebrity generated more information-sharing attributions and less monetary gain attributions than those from a mainstream celebrity on social media. Moreover, the experiential native ads from a micro-celebrity elicited greater intention to click the URL than those from a mainstream celebrity. However, consumer response was similar for promotional native advertising regardless of message source. This study demonstrates that information-sharing attributions mediate the interaction effects of source type and content types on click intention.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on native advertising by providing empirical evidence to highlight the effect of message source and content type on consumer response. This study shows that the success of native advertising depends on how consumers perceive the messages and content creators' intention to communicate.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Mikyoung Kim and Mira Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the source of brand-related user-generated content (UGC) (a close friend vs a celebrity) interacts with content sponsorship…

4463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the source of brand-related user-generated content (UGC) (a close friend vs a celebrity) interacts with content sponsorship (organic UGC vs sponsored UGC) to influence consumer causal attributions, brand attitude, and intention to comply with the recommendation.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 285 college students participated in a two (source: a close friend vs a celebrity) by two (content sponsorship: organic vs sponsored) between-subjects online experimental design.

Findings

Results showed that recommendation from a close friend generated more information-sharing attributions and less monetary-gain attributions than did recommendation from a celebrity when the brand-related UGC was organic. In contrast, source type did not influence causal attributions differently when the UGC was sponsored. Further, this study demonstrated that both information-sharing and monetary-gain attributions mediated the effects of source type and content sponsorship on brand attitude and intention to comply with the recommendation.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the effectiveness of celebrities as a source of brand-related UGC. Also, this research extends the existing knowledge about source effects by examining the relative effectiveness of two sources of product information, close friends and celebrities, who have both been found to be individually effective in the traditional marketing context. Additionally, the findings of this study that the relative effectiveness of source type depends on whether brand-related UGC is sponsored or not add a further insight into how source type influences the effectiveness of brand-related UGC.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2018

Babu Rajeswaran and Thirumaran Kesavaperumal

Entrance edifice of the institutional campus artifice as the visible representation of status in their society. The design shall stand to show the status of the person who…

Abstract

Entrance edifice of the institutional campus artifice as the visible representation of status in their society. The design shall stand to show the status of the person who develops the setting, it could signify the power of the person or the entire place, and it could sometimes support certain cosmological belief system that prevails in that culture too. This study intended to identify the entrance edifice Physical features that influence observer's perception of the image of the institutional campus. To accomplish this, physical features of the entrance edifice and its characters were identified and developed into questionnaire material. A logistic regression model was adopted to analyze the Physical features of Entrance Edifice. The findings found the followings: (i) Physical features of Entrance Edifice influence the Visual perception of the Institutional Campus. (ii) The Physical features were found to impact the Visual perception of the Institutional campus in the order of Form Identity, Architectural Elements, Scale and Portion, color and material. These variances are based on the observers' perception, which can be integrated into the Institutional Campus Entrance Edifice design to strengthen the Image of the Institutional campus. It is clear that Entrance Edifices have the potential to build the image for a greater content and purpose through its Form Identity, Architectural Elements, Scale and Portion, color and material. Nevertheless, the entrance design could be a powerful element to build up the image of the physical settings it serves.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Mira Lee, Mikyoung Kim and Wei Peng

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the facial expression of the reviewer's avatar interacts with the valence of the consumer review to influence consumer purchase…

3243

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the facial expression of the reviewer's avatar interacts with the valence of the consumer review to influence consumer purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (facial expression of the reviewer's avatar)× 2 (valence of the consumer review) between‐subjects online experimental design was used.

Findings

It was found that when the consumer review was positive, participants exposed to the reviewer's angry‐looking avatar were more likely to attribute the review to the product's performance than those exposed to the happy‐looking avatar. The causal attribution toward product performance, in turn, influenced the strength of intention to purchase the brand positively. When the consumer review was negative, however, there were no differential effects between the happy‐looking and the angry‐looking avatars.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on consumer reviews by identifying an important source characteristic that consumers consider when processing consumer reviews – the facial expression of the reviewer's avatar.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Mikyoung Kong and Giri Jogaratnam

The purpose of the study is to explore and compare customer perceptions of service encounter behavior in the USA and the Republic of Korea and to identify the relationship…

7932

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore and compare customer perceptions of service encounter behavior in the USA and the Republic of Korea and to identify the relationship of the underlying behavioral dimensions to customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was designed to collect data in the USA and Korea. Exploratory factor analysis was employed to extract the most distinct set of behavioral dimensions underlying each culture. Predictive validity was examined using correlations and regression analysis.

Findings

Key differences were found between US and Korean restaurant customers' perceptions of wait‐staff behavior and their impact on performance. While personalization was a significant predictor of satisfaction in the US sample, concern was a significant predictor for the Koreans. Courtesy and civility were important to both samples.

Practical implications

Customer satisfaction is strongly influenced by employee behavior. To ensure success in international markets, service providers should recognize and understand the differences that potentially exist based on nationality and culture. Resources allocation decisions pertaining to training and service provision should be designed to effectively respond to local customer needs.

Originality/value

Previous research seeking to explain customer satisfaction has for the most part overlooked the interaction between the customer and the service provider. This research extends previous work by examining cross‐cultural differences and intends to provide a better understanding of restaurant customers in the USA and Korea, as well as to enable restaurant operators and managers to better service their clientele in the global marketplace.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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