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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Mikio Ishiwatari

This study aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of investment in flood protection by analyzing the flood disaster caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Japan in October 2019. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of investment in flood protection by analyzing the flood disaster caused by Typhoon Hagibis in Japan in October 2019. The typhoon severely damaged the central and eastern Japan regions and threatened the Greater Tokyo area.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines flood risks in the Greater Tokyo area and reviews how the flood protection systems functioned to protect Tokyo from the typhoon. The hydrological data of rainfall and water levels at major rivers and the operation records of flood control facilities are collected and analyzed.

Findings

The study’s major finding is that the flood protection system succeeded in protecting the Greater Tokyo area from flooding. Typhoon Hagibis maintained its power until landing because of climate change and caused record-breaking rainfall. In a worst-case scenario, thousands of people could have died and hundreds of billions USD worth of assets could have been lost in Tokyo.

Practical implications

The paper describes the actual effects of the flood protection systems, consisting of dams constructed upstream, reservoirs midstream and diversion channels downstream. Thus, this study’s findings directly relate to practical implications for other countries and cities, which face flood risks under a changing climate.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of investing in flood protection by examining actual disasters and providing detailed descriptions of flood protection systems.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Mikio Ishiwatari

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) IPCC (2007) projects that greater precipitation intensity and variability will increase the risks of flooding in many…

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) IPCC (2007) projects that greater precipitation intensity and variability will increase the risks of flooding in many areas because of climate change. With climate change already happening, societies worldwide face the parallel challenge of having to adapt to its impacts as a certain degree of climate change is inevitable throughout this century and beyond, even if global mitigation efforts over the next decades prove successful (European Commission, 2007).

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: Issues and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-487-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2012

Mikio Ishiwatari

The community plays a crucial role in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The Hyogo Declaration adopted at the World Conference on Disaster Reduction held in Kobe in 2005…

Abstract

The community plays a crucial role in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The Hyogo Declaration adopted at the World Conference on Disaster Reduction held in Kobe in 2005 stresses that strengthening community-level capacities to reduce disaster risk at the local level is especially needed (UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction [UNISDR], 2005). Following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 in Japan, community-based organizations (CBOs) have conducted various activities, such as searching and rescuing victims, closing gates, monitoring tsunamis, assisting evacuation, firefighting, and operating evacuation shelters at the risk of their staff's lives, while local governments lost their staff and facilities in the functions of disaster management. Some 250 volunteer members of firefighting CBOs were dead or are still missing.

Details

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-868-8

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Abstract

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: Issues and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-487-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2012

Abstract

Details

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-868-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Tzu-Ling Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of place attachment and risk perception with bounded rationality on the willingness to live in a high-earthquake-risk area.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of place attachment and risk perception with bounded rationality on the willingness to live in a high-earthquake-risk area.

Design/methodology/approach

The study establishes a hypothetical model on the basis of the theory of planned behavior, place attachment and risk perception. A structural equation model (SEM) measures the relationships between the variables.

Findings

Place attachment affects individuals and their preferences; it makes them willing to continue living in high-earthquake-risk areas. Additionally, risk perception with bounded rationality (fatalism and optimism bias) might make people believe there is only a slight risk of physical injury or property damage. The overall findings moderately suggest that land-use regulations along fault zone areas are not necessarily driving households away, and such allowance of residential use in the current zoning regulation might mislead people that it is a safe area.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses questionnaires in fault zone-regulated areas where only the fault line has zoning regulations. In addition, the application of SEM has to build upon theory and further examine both direct and indirect effects. The assessment criteria of the model might be limited by the sample amount, causing certain model-fitting results, which are not that significant. The overall findings might be limited by the geographical location and cannot be generalized to other areas in Taiwan.

Practical implications

A more thorough assessment of land-use planning in earthquake-risk areas should consider households’ risk perceptions and adaptation behaviors.

Originality/value

Land-use regulations along fault zone areas might reveal earthquake risk in such areas or mislead people that it is a safe area. Place attachment and risk perceptions might affect individuals’ judgments of whether such risk exists or not. The results could be referred to disaster management in high-earthquake-risk areas.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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