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1 – 10 of 151
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Mike Rao

A discussion of US higher education at the time of the transition from an industrial to a knowledge‐based economy. This is the time when people need to be educated to cope with…

197

Abstract

A discussion of US higher education at the time of the transition from an industrial to a knowledge‐based economy. This is the time when people need to be educated to cope with not just one job for life but a series of different jobs demanding different skills and aptitudes. Universities and colleges have to gear up to meet this demand. One of the big challenges is having the necessary leadership within these institutions to effect the necessary changes.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Tom Kennedy

Anyone who has been a member of academia for any considerable length of time will resonate with de Bono and Machiavelli. Our universities do not usualloy befriend change and…

Abstract

Anyone who has been a member of academia for any considerable length of time will resonate with de Bono and Machiavelli. Our universities do not usualloy befriend change and innovation; in fact, these institutions usually ignore them.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

James J.F. Forest

A discussion of the key differences between the Republican and the Democrat parties’ views on education at the time of Bush and Gore’s battle for the presidency. The paper bemoans…

Abstract

A discussion of the key differences between the Republican and the Democrat parties’ views on education at the time of Bush and Gore’s battle for the presidency. The paper bemoans the insidious effects politics can have on the focus and meaning of education in the US.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Terry L. Amburgey

Every paper needs a theme. Luckily, the venue defines the theme for me; how did the initial conditions at Stanford affect the development and diffusion of population ecology as a…

Abstract

Every paper needs a theme. Luckily, the venue defines the theme for me; how did the initial conditions at Stanford affect the development and diffusion of population ecology as a theoretical research program. I use the term theoretical research program reluctantly, especially considering the context of the department of sociology at Stanford University during the 1970s and 1980s (Lakatos & Musgrave, 1970). Nonetheless, I believe that population ecology can be usefully described as such. It is not a theory but rather a collection of theories developing over time with progressive problem shifts. There are methodological rules that define what paths of research to pursue and to avoid (Pfeffer, 1993, p. 613).

Details

Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Casey L. Donoho, Michael J. Polonsky, Scott Roberts and David A. Cohen

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core relationships of…

1780

Abstract

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core relationships of the general theory of marketing ethics were successfully replicated using over 1,500 students from seven universities in the USA, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia. States that tomorrow’s managers appeared to use a more deontological approach to making ethical judgements about personal selling. Extends its original research by confirming the positive relationship between the probability and the desirability of consequences. Concludes that, although the model was originally intended to explain management ethical decision making, the study shows that it may be possible to generalize as to how individuals make ethical life decisions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Mike Reid and David Buisson

Highlights the findings of a survey targeting UK and European wholesale and retail fruit buyers to discover factors which influence their adoption of apple and pear varieties. The…

1757

Abstract

Highlights the findings of a survey targeting UK and European wholesale and retail fruit buyers to discover factors which influence their adoption of apple and pear varieties. The research, performed from the perspective of the New Zealand pipfruit industry, reflects the growing importance of new variety development for the ongoing competitiveness of the New Zealand pipfruit industry. The research identifies that adoption of new varieties requires a strong performance in traditional areas such as product quality and supply. The need for appropriate launch support provided by the suppliers is highlighted and also that adoption is likely to be facilitated by strong buyer/supplier relationships.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Soma Chaudhuri, Preethi Krishnan and Mangala Subramaniam

Over the past few years, the electronic media, as represented by the internet version of print media and independent blogs of journalists, has become a major player in the…

Abstract

Over the past few years, the electronic media, as represented by the internet version of print media and independent blogs of journalists, has become a major player in the coverage of incidents related to violence against women. While this has brought forward issues of violence and specifically rape prominently into the public sphere, the media portrayal of women has often been as victims or victims who are somehow responsible for the violence against them. Such portrayal has been repeatedly challenged by feminists. Using data from 572 national and international English media reports for a six-month period (from December 2012 to April 2013) the coverage of the protests about the 2012 case of gang rape and eventual death of Jyoti Singh Pandey in India’s capital city, New Delhi, is examined in this chapter. Drawing from past research, three main frames are discerned in the portrayal of women in the reports: mainstreaming gender, endangered woman, and the ungendered woman. Media portrayals of these three frames by three broadly categorized actors most prominently covered by the media reports are analyzed: activists, state representatives or political actors, and ordinary citizens. The findings suggest that while some reports allude to women’s agency and rights particularly when they cover feminist activists, women’s agency is marginalized in the debates around safety and protection for women when other actors (such as state representatives or political actors, and ordinary citizens) are considered. Indian women’s rights have been reduced to passive messages negating the broader politics of the contemporary women’s movement.

Details

Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Stefanie Mauksch, Pascal Dey, Mike Rowe and Simon Teasdale

As a critical and intimate form of inquiry, ethnography remains close to lived realities and equips scholars with a unique methodological angle on social phenomena. This paper…

4189

Abstract

Purpose

As a critical and intimate form of inquiry, ethnography remains close to lived realities and equips scholars with a unique methodological angle on social phenomena. This paper aims to explore the potential gains from an increased use of ethnography in social enterprise studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop the argument through a set of dualistic themes, namely, the socio-economic dichotomy and the discourse/practice divide as predominant critical lenses through which social enterprise is currently examined, and suggest shifts from visible leaders to invisible collectives and from case study-based monologues to dialogic ethnography.

Findings

Ethnography sheds new light on at least four neglected aspects. Studying social enterprises ethnographically complicates simple reductions to socio-economic tensions, by enriching the set of differences through which practitioners make sense of their work-world. Ethnography provides a tool for unravelling how practitioners engage with discourse(s) of power, thus marking the concrete results of intervention (to some degree at least) as unplannable, and yet effective. Ethnographic examples signal the merits of moving beyond leaders towards more collective representations and in-depth accounts of (self-)development. Reflexive ethnographies demonstrate the heuristic value of accepting the self as an inevitable part of research and exemplify insights won through a thoroughly bodily and emotional commitment to sharing the life world of others.

Originality/value

The present volume collects original ethnographic research of social enterprises. The editorial develops the first consistent account of the merits of studying social enterprises ethnographically.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 13 no. 02
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Nancy Chen, Mike Chen-ho Chao, Henry Xie and Dean Tjosvold

Scholarly research provides few insights into how integrating the western values of individualism and low power distance with the eastern values of collectivism and high power…

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Abstract

Purpose

Scholarly research provides few insights into how integrating the western values of individualism and low power distance with the eastern values of collectivism and high power distance may influence cross-cultural conflict management. Following the framework of the theory of cooperation and competition, the purpose of this paper is to directly examine the impacts of organization-level collectivism and individualism, as well as high and low power distance, to determine the interactive effects of these four factors on cross-cultural conflict management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a 2×2 experiment study. Data were collected from a US laboratory experiment with 80 participants.

Findings

American managers working in a company embracing western low power distance and eastern collectivism values were able to manage conflict cooperatively with their Chinese workers. Moreover, American managers working in a company valuing collectivism developed more trust with Chinese workers, and those in a company culture with high power distance were more interested in their workers’ viewpoints and more able to reach integrated solutions.

Originality/value

This study is an interdisciplinary research applying the social psychology field’s theory of cooperation and competition to the research on employee-manager, cross-cultural conflict management (which are industrial relations and organizational behavior topics, respectively), with an eye to the role of cultural adaptation. Furthermore, this study included an experiment to directly investigate the interactions between American managers and Chinese workers discussing work distribution conflict in four different organizational cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Brian P. Reschke and Ming D. Leung

Since initial demonstrations that categories are consequential for evaluation, scholars of organizations and markets have attended to dynamics in audience evaluations of category…

Abstract

Since initial demonstrations that categories are consequential for evaluation, scholars of organizations and markets have attended to dynamics in audience evaluations of category spanning. We consider how heterogeneity in evaluator engagement in a market may alter their evaluation of atypical candidates. In markets where evaluators self-propagate theories of diversification, atypical candidates are advantaged because they present a distinct and efficient opportunity to diversify. We argue that evaluator market engagement will (positively) moderate valuations of atypicality, as such evaluators will be better positioned to recognize atypical candidates and their alignment with prevailing theories of value. We find support for our contentions with data from an online peer-to-peer lending market, Prosper.com. Consistent with our hypothesis, we find that lender evaluation of these atypical borrowers is increasing in their market engagement: whereas lenders new to the market devalue atypical candidates, those who have made many evaluations evaluate atypicality positively.

Details

The Generation, Recognition and Legitimation of Novelty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-998-0

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1 – 10 of 151