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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Mike Nolan, Sue Davies and Jayne Brown

Long‐term care in general, and care homes in particular, have never enjoyed high status as a place to live and work. This remains the case. In large part this marginalised…

Abstract

Long‐term care in general, and care homes in particular, have never enjoyed high status as a place to live and work. This remains the case. In large part this marginalised position is due to the continued failure to value the contribution that care homes make to supporting frail and vulnerable older people. In order to promote a more positive vision of what can be achieved in care homes, this paper argues for the adoption of a relationship‐centred approach to care. The need for such a model is described, and how it might be applied using the ‘Senses Framework’ is considered. It is argued that adopting such a philosophy will provide a clearer sense of therapeutic direction for staff working in care homes, as well as more explicitly recognising the contribution that residents and relatives can make to creating an ‘enriched environment’ of care.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Mike Nolan

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Working with Older People, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Mike Nolan, Elizabeth Hanson, Lennart Magnusson and Bengt‐Arne Andersson

This article outlines a model for gauging the quality of a partnership approach to research that was developed for use in a Research Centre in West Sweden. The Äldre Väst…

Abstract

This article outlines a model for gauging the quality of a partnership approach to research that was developed for use in a Research Centre in West Sweden. The Äldre Väst Sjuhärad Centre has as its main goal the promotion of partnerships between older people and their families, service providers and researchers. In pursuing these goals the Centre adopts a broadly‐constructivist approach to undertaking research that is ‘authentic’ and meaningful to those who take part. In order to make judgements about the quality of its activity the Centre has adapted the authenticity criteria originally suggested by Guba and Lincoln (1989), so that they are more readily understood by older people, carers and service providers. These criteria can be applied at all stages of research activity, and it is suggested here that they can be utilised more widely in order to make inferences about the effects of partnership working in other contexts.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Sion Williams, Mike Nolan and John Keady

Discharging frail older people from acute hospital settings has been an issue of concern for over 40 years and recent studies suggest that enduring problems remain. This…

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Discharging frail older people from acute hospital settings has been an issue of concern for over 40 years and recent studies suggest that enduring problems remain. This paper explores the experiences of discharge from three different units: an acute surgical ward, an acute medical ward and a specialist ward for older people. Based on extensive data from interviews with older people, their family carers and ward‐based staff, a grounded theory of the discharge experience is presented. This suggests that the quality of discharge hinges largely on whether the focus of efforts is on ‘pace’ (the desire to discharge older people as rapidly as possible) or ‘complexity’ (where due account is taken of the complex interaction of medical and wider social issues). When pace is the focus, ‘pushing’ and ‘fixing’ are the main processes driving discharge. However, when attention is given to complexity, far more subtle processes of ‘informing’ and ‘brokering’ are in evidence. These latter processes are conceived of as forms of ‘relational practice’ and it is argued that such practices lie at the heart of high quality care for older people.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Lennart Magnusson, Mike Nolan, Liz Hanson, Harriet Berthold and BengtArne Andersson

This article describes the aims and philosophy of a research centre focusing on the needs of older people and their family carers in West Sweden (ÄldreVäst Sjuhärad). The…

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This article describes the aims and philosophy of a research centre focusing on the needs of older people and their family carers in West Sweden (ÄldreVäst Sjuhärad). The Centre aims to promote partnerships between older people, their carers and service agencies in order to improve the quality of life and quality of care. In achieving this aim it has adopted a model of working based on principles taken from a constructivist approach to research and evaluation. The quality or ‘authenticity’ criteria of this approach underpin the Centre's modus operandi and, it is suggested, could from the basis of a more user‐friendly perspective on research.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Anne Perks, Mike Nolan, Tony Ryan, Pam Enderby, Isabel Hemmings and Karen Robinson

Respite care or ‘short breaks’ are currently heavily promoted as services to support older people and their carers. However, uptake of such services can be limited and…

Abstract

Respite care or ‘short breaks’ are currently heavily promoted as services to support older people and their carers. However, uptake of such services can be limited and there is a need to design models which are more flexible and responsive, and also reflect the ethos of personcentred care, which is currently one of the main drivers of health and social care policy in the UK. This paper describes the rationale for, and the philosophy behind, a new service for people with dementia and their carers recently established in Sheffield which provides respite care in the person's own home. The importance of user and carer involvement is highlighted and the need for new approaches to evaluation stressed.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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1 – 10 of 103