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Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar and Fariza Hashim

International management control and organisational behaviour.

Abstract

Subject area

International management control and organisational behaviour.

Study level/applicability

This case is suitable for final year undergraduate and Master's students as well as for the general practitioner. It is suitable for the university course program and for in-company training seminars. For company training seminars, the human resources department and finance would most probably benefit from the discussion of the case.

Case overview

This case was about a company that was eager to expand its business internationally as it gains success in the home market. Having being entrusted by the company CEO to lead the project, the enthusiastic “project champion” lavishly spent the company investments with minimal control from the parent company.

Expected learning outcomes

After carrying out this exercise, students are expected to be able to: first, decide a firm mode of entry, scale of entry and strategic commitment; second, determine the market potential of a particular business venture; third, suggest the management structure and control for international subsidiaries; fourth, decide the possible exit strategy of a business venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Abstract

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2016

Jean Boddewyn

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on…

Abstract

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond, Jean J. Boddewyn, Editor). It traces what happened under the deanship of Alan Rugman (2011–2014) who took many initiatives reported here while his death in July 2014 generated trenchant, funny, and loving comments from more than half of the AIB Fellows. The lives and contributions of many other major international business scholars who passed away from 2008 to 2014 are also evoked here: Endel Kolde, Lee Nehrt, Howard Perlmutter, Stefan Robock, John Ryans, Vern Terpstra, and Daniel Van Den Bulcke.

Details

Perspectives on Headquarters-subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-370-2

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Paul Fadil, Sharon L. Segrest‐Purkiss, Amy E. Hurley‐Hanson, Mike Knudstrup and Lee Stepina

A comparison of distributive justice strategies was made between a collectivistic culture, i.e., Mexico, and an individualistic culture, i.e., the United States. This…

Abstract

A comparison of distributive justice strategies was made between a collectivistic culture, i.e., Mexico, and an individualistic culture, i.e., the United States. This study is the first to include the effect of ingroup/outgroup on the distribution strategies as Fischer and Smith (2003) called for in their extensive meta‐analysis of the topic. Distributive justice was operationalized as the monetary rewards given by Northern Mexicans and Americans in sixteen different allocation vignettes. The results showed that the two groups were significantly different in only one of the allocation vignettes. These results indicate a convergence between the cultures of the northern maquiladora region of Mexico and of the United States. Northern Mexicans and Americans were not significantly different in their distributive justice strategies.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Helene Cherrier, Iain R. Black and Mike Lee

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue theme by analysing intentional non‐consumption through anti‐consumption and consumer resistance lenses.

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6256

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue theme by analysing intentional non‐consumption through anti‐consumption and consumer resistance lenses.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 in‐depth interviews with women who intentionally practise non‐consumption for sustainability were completed.

Findings

Two major themes where identified: I versus them: the careless consumers, and The objective/subjective dialectic in mundane practices.

Originality/value

While it is tempting to delineate one concept from another, in practice, both anti‐consumption and consumer resistance intersect and represent complementary frameworks in studying non‐consumption.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Peter Nuttall and Martin Evans

When Theodore Levitt discussed how firms respond to the question “what business are we in?”, he highlighted the myopic perceptions of some because they viewed their…

Abstract

When Theodore Levitt discussed how firms respond to the question “what business are we in?”, he highlighted the myopic perceptions of some because they viewed their business as “running a railroad” or “making films” — rather than being “in the transport or entertainment market”.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Jongkuk Lee and William J. Qualls

The objective of this paper is to propose a process through which channel stakeholders interact with one another to adopt a buyer‐seller technology with the purpose of…

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2188

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to propose a process through which channel stakeholders interact with one another to adopt a buyer‐seller technology with the purpose of improving the efficiency of their supply chain. The paper seeks to examine how ongoing business relationships between channel stakeholders influence the process of buyer‐seller technology adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) to dyadic adoption behaviour by incorporating a social network perspective for buyer‐seller relationships.

Findings

Buyer‐seller technology adoption occurs at multiple levels throughout a supply chain network. Although each channel stakeholder forms its own behavioural intention to adopt a new enterprise technology, actual adoption occurs at the dyadic level between two channel stakeholders. Network embeddedness and resource dependence can influence the individual firm and dyadic processes of buyer‐seller technology adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study imply that successful implementation of a buyer‐seller technology requires attention to the relationships between channel stakeholders as well as each channel stakeholder's internal needs and capability of adopting the technology.

Originality/value

The paper offers a social network perspective of buyer‐seller behaviour when adopting a new technology. The model provides a framework through which the impact of internal and relational factors on technology adoption behaviour can be examined systematically at the dyadic level of supply chain relationships.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Executive summary
Publication date: 13 March 2020

UNITED STATES: FISA court reform battle will heat up

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES251331

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

James Shein and Loredana Yamada

Sara Lee Corporation's acquisition binge in the 1980s and 1990s left the company with a portfolio of vastly different businesses operating independently of one another. It…

Abstract

Sara Lee Corporation's acquisition binge in the 1980s and 1990s left the company with a portfolio of vastly different businesses operating independently of one another. It had experienced rapid top-line growth, but at the same time cash flows had declined. Sara Lee ignored both internal and external warning signs until a major transformation plan became necessary. This case examines the company's multiple turnaround attempts. The learning objective of the case is to analyze “early stage” turnaround efforts by examining how the company found itself in decline, evaluating its attempts to improve its performance, and assessing the turnaround plan.

(1) Learn to identify a specific challenging moment when reading and analyzing a turnaround plan; (2) address the implementation problems of an early stage turnaround and discuss exit options; (3) evaluate when a change of long-held beliefs and decades-long strategy by a company is warranted; (4) evaluate Sara Lee's marketing strategies in light of the disappointed retail and wholesale customers; and (5) show the similarities in traits between turnaround managers and high-growth entrepreneurs.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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