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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2022

Michael Doyle, Mike Garnham, Sharon Carter and Mike Ventress

Risk assessment is a fundamental part of clinical practice in mental health and learning disability services in the UK. Most services use a tool or framework to structure…

Abstract

Purpose

Risk assessment is a fundamental part of clinical practice in mental health and learning disability services in the UK. Most services use a tool or framework to structure their clinical judgments, but there does not appear to be a consensus on which risk assessment tool should be used. This paper aims to describe the development, implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based formulation informed risk management (FIRM) framework in mental health and LD services.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of FIRM and evaluation was based on the model for improvement, with an emphasis on co-production broken down into three distinct yet interdependent phases of co-production: co-design, co-create and co-deliver. Following the implementation of the FIRM framework, a post-implementation survey was distributed to a sample of clinical staff to capture experiences in the first three months post-implementation.

Findings

The three co-production stages were pivotal for successful implementation in clinical practice. The key ingredients for success seemed to be acknowledging human factors and varied responses to change, communication, engagement and involvement of stakeholders. Early evaluation post-implementation demonstrated the benefits in terms of confidence in use, formulation of risk, risk management and communication. Further quality improvement initiatives are underway to evaluate impact up to 12 months post-implementation and to improve the quality of FIRM in practice. Future research is planned to look at enhancing personalised risk assessment and management.

Originality/value

This paper describes and demonstrates the value of co-production with clinicians and stakeholders in service development. The FIRM has improved the clinical practice of risk assessment, formulation and management and use of digital technology.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Pete Canalichio

Abstract

Details

Expand, Grow, Thrive
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-782-1

Abstract

Details

Arts and Academia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-730-5

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Lorraine Fox Harding

This paper will consider the notion of “parental responsibility” in British policy in relation to two major pieces of legislation, the Children Act 1989 and the Child…

Abstract

This paper will consider the notion of “parental responsibility” in British policy in relation to two major pieces of legislation, the Children Act 1989 and the Child Support Act 1991. These have considerable impact on the shape of policy in relation to families with children in the 1990s. These two Acts originate in different processes and address different areas of the family‐ state interaction — in the case of the Children Act, public and private law concerning who should care for children in case of dispute or problems; in the case of the Child Support Act, the question of how children should be financially maintained. But both embody a notion of greater parental responsibilities (as opposed to rights) which cannot be lightly surrendered or neglected. The differences and similarities between these two Acts will be examined, and the underlying theme of Conservative “family policy”, and its long‐term intentions and implications, will be addressed.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Pete Canalichio

Abstract

Details

Expand, Grow, Thrive
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-782-1

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library…

Abstract

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties. Anything that Mr. Jast has to say is said with originality even if the subject is not original; his quality has always been to give an independent and novel twist to almost everything he touches. We think our readers will find this to be so when he touches the important question of “The Library and Leisure.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

R.G. Lentz

Traces the trajectory of the digital divides by focusing on different areas of research that are competing to shape the public policy agenda. Posits that policy should…

Abstract

Traces the trajectory of the digital divides by focusing on different areas of research that are competing to shape the public policy agenda. Posits that policy should focus at least as much on the context and content of technology use as it has this far on the increased distribution of computing resources.

Details

info, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2023

N.T. Khuong Truong, Susan J. Smith, Gavin Wood, William A.V. Clark, William Lisowski and Rachel Ong ViforJ

The purpose of this paper is to consider one test of a well-functioning housing system – its impact on wellbeing. Exploring one indicator of this, this study aims to track…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider one test of a well-functioning housing system – its impact on wellbeing. Exploring one indicator of this, this study aims to track changes in mental and general health across a mix of tenure transitions and financial transactions in three jurisdictions: Australia, the UK and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using matched variables from three national panel surveys (Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia, British Household Panel Survey/Understanding Society and Panel Study of Income Dynamics) over 17 years (2000–2017) to capture the sweep of the most recent housing cycle, this study adopts a difference-in-difference random-effects model specification to estimate the mental and general health effects of tenure change and borrowing behaviours.

Findings

There is an enduring health premium associated with unmortgaged owner-occupation. Mortgage debt detracts from this, as does the prospect of dropping out of ownership and into renting. A previously observed post-exit recovery in mental health – a debt-relief effect – is not present in the longer run. In fact, in some circumstances, both mental and general health deficits are amplified, even among those who eventually regain homeownership. Though there are cross-country differences, the similarities across these financialised housing systems are more striking.

Practical implications

The well-being premium traditionally associated with owner occupation is under threat at the edges of the sector in all three jurisdictions. In this, there is cross-national convergence. There may therefore be scope to introduce policies to better support households at the edges of ownership that work across the board for debt-funded ownership-centred housing systems.

Originality/value

This paper extends the duration of a previous analysis of the impact of tenure transitions and financial transactions on well-being at the edges of ownership in the UK and Australia. The authors now track households over nearly two decades from the start of the millennium into a lengthy (post-global financial crisis) era of declining housing affordability. This study adds to the reach of the earlier study by adding a general health variable and a third jurisdiction, the USA.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Jean Paul Simon

The purpose of this paper is to compare the history of the notion of universal service in the USA and the EU.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the history of the notion of universal service in the USA and the EU.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an historical account based on desk research and interviews.

Findings

The paper finds that the concept looks “universal”, so to speak, but is grounded in different legal and economic traditions. From an historical perspective, the conditions appear to be highly differentiated on either side of the Atlantic. Ironically, the main point in common, beyond the mere use of the same term, is the discrepancy between the alleged goal and the socio‐economic reality, which has existed for some decades.

Originality/value

The paper puts into an historical perspective the notion of universal service. It identifies strengths and weaknesses of the implemention in the EU and the USA.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Alan J. Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for designing and generating cumulative knowledge based on qualitative research.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for designing and generating cumulative knowledge based on qualitative research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the philosophy of science and specific examples of qualitative studies in accounting that have claimed a cumulative contribution to knowledge to develop a taxonomy of theoretically justified approaches to generating cumulative knowledge from qualitative research.

Findings

The paper argues for a definition of cumulative knowledge that is inclusive of anti-realist research, i.e. knowledge is cumulative if it increases the extent and density of intertextual linkages in a field. It identifies the possibility of cumulative qualitative research based on extensions to the scope of the knowledge and the depth of the knowledge. Extensions to the scope of the knowledge may include expanding the time periods, context, and/or theoretical perspective used to explore a phenomenon. Extensions to the depth of the knowledge may include new empirical knowledge, methodological pluralism, theory elaboration, or analytic generalization. Individual studies can demonstrate their contribution to cumulative knowledge by locating their research within a typology/taxonomy that makes explicit the relationship of current research to past, and potential, research.

Research limitations/implications

The taxonomy may be useful to qualitative researchers designing and reporting research that will have impact on the literature.

Social implications

The increased use of research impact as an evaluation metric has the potential to handicap the development qualitative research which is often thought of as generating non-cumulative knowledge. The taxonomy and the strategies for establishing cumulative impact may provide a means for this approach to research to establish its importance as a contribution to knowledge.

Originality/value

The concept of cumulative knowledge has not been systematically applied to research based on qualitative methods.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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