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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Mike Cooke

The success ofFunctions of primary care groups (PCG) should be considered ahead of structures and those forming PCGs need to see the links between the key health and…

Abstract

The success ofFunctions of primary care groups (PCG) should be considered ahead of structures and those forming PCGs need to see the links between the key health and social policy initiatives. Early influence by PCGs will shape the design and local implementation of health action zones, health improvement programmes and performance frameworks. The Green Paper “Our Healthier Nation” and its successor are central to the emerging role of PCGs. Partnership work between GPs, practice staff, trusts, local authorities and health authorities needs emphasis. Recognition of what people and existing organisations can contribute needs to be given. Leadership themes of good primary care operations, health development and clinical leadership or their equivalents need time and space to emerge.

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Health Manpower Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Mohamed Zairi, John Whymark and Mike Cooke

Measuring organisational effectiveness in a health care delivery context is a challenging task. Although there are numerous performa]nce assessment models, audit tools and…

Abstract

Measuring organisational effectiveness in a health care delivery context is a challenging task. Although there are numerous performa]nce assessment models, audit tools and managerial diagnostic tools, they all tend to fall short in their attempts to closely scrutinise how health care organisations deploy their capabilities to deliver optimum quality in service provision and what performance levels they achieve as a result of their approach. The project reported here attempted to address the aforementioned issues. It set out to examine health care providers from an integrated perspective and to assess the key drivers of effective organisational performance using an adapted model based on the 7s’ principles. The research project culminated into a major report highlighting best practices found to be inherent in 18 well performing health care providers. This paper reflects the experience of one of a series of Trusts whose approach to organisational effectiveness was closely examined.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Mohamed Zairi, Mike Cooke and John Whymark

Measuring organisational effectiveness in a health‐care delivery context is quite a challenging task. Although there are numerous performance assessment models, audit…

Abstract

Measuring organisational effectiveness in a health‐care delivery context is quite a challenging task. Although there are numerous performance assessment models, audit tools and managerial diagnostic tools, they all, however, tend to fall short in their attempts to scrutinise how health‐care organisations deploy their capabilities to deliver optimum quality in service provision and what performance levels they achieved as a result of their approach. The project reported here attempted to address these issues, reflecting the experience of Leeds Teaching Hospitals, one of a series of Trusts whose approach to organisational effectiveness was closely examined.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1973

Roger Fern

Newcastle University Library is installing an Automated Library Systems (ALS) issue system, which will start operation in October 1973. In an ALS issue system each book…

Abstract

Newcastle University Library is installing an Automated Library Systems (ALS) issue system, which will start operation in October 1973. In an ALS issue system each book must have a unique number. At Newcastle all our monographs have an accession number which is adequate for this purpose. Unlike some university libraries, New‐castle issues bound volumes of periodicals as well as monographs, and these do not have an accession number. As we wanted to include periodical issues in the automated system, a number had to be assigned to each volume, and some means devised of recognising which number belonged to which volume.

Details

Program, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

Roger Fern and John Bagnall

The automated order system at Newcastle University Library has been running on the University's KDF 9 computer since Easter 1966. The KDF 9 is due to go out of service in…

Abstract

The automated order system at Newcastle University Library has been running on the University's KDF 9 computer since Easter 1966. The KDF 9 is due to go out of service in the near future, and so the order system is being re‐programmed for the University's IBM 360 model 67 computer. The IBM machine has 1024k bytes of core storage, 12 disk drives, 4 tape drives, and has a large number of terminals for on‐line ‘conversational’ access. For most of the day the machine is operated under the Michigan Terminal System (called ‘MTS’) rather than under the standard IBM operating system (called ‘OS/360’). The University Library has a terminal for its own use (an IBM 2741 ‘golf‐ball’ typewriter terminal).

Details

Program, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Ioannis Tsalavoutas, Lisa Evans and Mike Smith

The purpose of this research is to highlight the differences, and implications of any differences, between two approaches to measuring compliance with International…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to highlight the differences, and implications of any differences, between two approaches to measuring compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) mandatory disclosure requirements: the commonly used “dichotomous” approach; and the alternative, but rarely used, partial compliance unweighted approach. The former gives equal weight to the individual items required to be disclosed by all standards. The latter assumes that each standard is of equal importance and consequently gives equal weight to each standard.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs both methods on a sample of companies. We then compare the results deriving from the application of the two methods and statistically test their differences.

Findings

It is found that the two methods produce significantly different overall and relative (i.e. ranking order) compliance scores.

Practical implications

This paper should alert researchers to the implications of using either method. Additionally, it highlights the need for academics and/or practitioners to be cautious when interpreting the findings of prior studies on compliance with IFRS mandatory disclosure requirements. Since the two methods produce significantly different compliance scores, findings regarding the variables associated with compliance may differ, depending on the disclosure index method followed. The paper suggests that simultaneous application of both methods would result in more robust findings in future research.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare the results produced by applying both methods and statistically test their differences. The research methods explored are in particular relevant for policy‐oriented, international accounting research.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2019

Jie Xia, Mingqiong Mike Zhang, Jiuhua Cherrie Zhu, Di Fan and Ramanie Samaratunge

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of human resource management (HRM) reforms on job-related well-being of academics in Chinese universities. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of human resource management (HRM) reforms on job-related well-being of academics in Chinese universities. It also tests the mediating effect of work intensification (WI) and affective commitment (AC), and the moderating effect of perceived organizational justice (OJ) on the HRM‒well-being relationship to understand the influence mechanisms and boundary conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted in 25 Chinese universities, obtaining 638 usable questionnaires. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used as the analytical technique to examine the model fit and test hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal that the relationship of HRM and well-being is neither direct nor unconditional, and a win‒win scenario for both management and employee well-being is possible when organizations pursue HRM innovations.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are that data were collected at once and at a defined time, with no time lag being involved. In addition, all variables were self-reported.

Practical implications

Commitment-oriented HRM practices can create a win‒win scenario; when control-oriented HRM practices are necessary, managers should ensure OJ to offset their negative influence on employees.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to examine the impact of HRM on employee well-being in the context of Chinese higher education, contributing to the limited studies on HRM in Chinese public sector and the on-going debate on the nature of HRM in China.

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2019

Timothy Olsen and Richard Welke

Many governments and public organizations are turning to shared service arrangements to decrease costs while increasing service levels. This paper aims to elucidate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Many governments and public organizations are turning to shared service arrangements to decrease costs while increasing service levels. This paper aims to elucidate the fine-grained challenges managers face as they adjust to working under a shared service arrangement.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-year longitudinal ethnographic field study followed the IT shared service transformation process at a large public university. Meeting observations, emails, documents and interviews were used in the qualitative analysis.

Findings

The research identifies 11 challenges faced by management undergoing a transition to shared services. The authors use a taxonomy of management challenges based on the organizational perspectives literature (Knol et al., 2014) to organize the challenges and relate them to prior literature.

Research limitations/implications

The novel findings include the importance of changing organizational culture, balancing dual interests of cost and customer focus, establishing a sense of urgency and achieving process standardization through practicing when adopting a shared service arrangement. The results from a single case study may not by generalizable to other organizations.

Originality/value

This study provides a nuanced and fine-grained understanding of the managerial challenges of adopting IT-shared services. This unique longitudinal data set describes in nuanced detail the challenges faced by frontline managers.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Howard Cooke

Abstract

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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