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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Mike Briggs and Adi Cooper

The paper reports on the findings of a survey of 115 (76 per cent) of English local authorities in 2016 which compared progress on the implementation of the Making…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports on the findings of a survey of 115 (76 per cent) of English local authorities in 2016 which compared progress on the implementation of the Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP) approach in local authorities through their Adult Social Care departments and in relation to their area Safeguarding Adults Boards (SABs) and partner organisations. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the survey in relation to personalised social care and its impact on organisations, their staff and service users, and conclude with wider implications and recommendations for further work.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of guided interviews were conducted with safeguarding leads from a sample comprising of 115 (76 per cent) of English local authorities during May and June 2016. The sample was randomly picked and balanced to give a fair representation of the different types of councils. The interviews were conducted by a team of five people. All interviewers had in-depth experience of adult safeguarding and were currently practicing independent chairs of SABs. The interviewers followed a prepared schedule consisting of a mixture of open and closed questions. All interviews were held over the phone and averaged one-hour duration.

Findings

The results pointed to the impression that the majority of local authorities had completed the first step of introducing MSP, i.e. they had trained their workers and modified their systems. Most local authorities were moving into the next phase of embedding user-focussed work into their practice and culture, and were at various points along that journey. However, most had still to engage partner organisations beyond a mere acceptance of MSP as “a good thing”.

Research limitations/implications

The research has wide ranging implications for organisations and their workers in the field of adult safeguarding based on its findings. Its limitations are that only organisational leaders and managers were interviewed, although reference is extensively made to initiatives that engage service users. The authors acknowledged the possible bias of interviewees when judging the performance of their own service and attempted to moderate their views in the final report.

Practical implications

The report references many practical implications to improve the practice of adult safeguarding in an attempt to make it more person-centred. Examples of good practice are given and recommendations are made to organisations.

Social implications

It is recognised that there are many people who may be at risk of harm through their environmental, personal, age or disability-related situations. In improving the way that services respond to their needs, they will be made to feel safer and their lives enhanced.

Originality/value

This original research follows up previous research in the preceding year. It is the widest ranging in its coverage of 76 per cent of English local authorities. Its value is that it measures progress towards full implementation of MSP; reports information and views from safeguarding leaders; and makes 20 recommendations to improve the implementation of MSP within local authorities, SABs and their partners.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Mike Briggs

Since the first sand‐blasting machine was patented by Tilghman in 1870 abrasive blasting has grown from a means of decorating glass through a method of removing sand from…

Abstract

Since the first sand‐blasting machine was patented by Tilghman in 1870 abrasive blasting has grown from a means of decorating glass through a method of removing sand from castings, into the standard method of preparation of steel work prior to painting. Abrasive blast cleaning now forms a major part of the painting contracting and building restoration industries as well as retaining its older applications in dressing castings.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

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Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Shradha Kabra, Sumanjit Dass and Sapna Popli

Reality television is a dynamic, profit-making platform that occupies prime-time slots on the television almost all over the world. Despite its immense popularity and…

Abstract

Purpose

Reality television is a dynamic, profit-making platform that occupies prime-time slots on the television almost all over the world. Despite its immense popularity and influence, it has received little attention in the extant literature and almost none in terms of its impact on celebrity repositioning. This study aims at examining the relationship between the film stars as brands and the impact of the platform of reality television in repositioning these celebrities in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Through extensive literature review and qualitative interviews, the paper expounds that reality television provides an opportunity to celebrities to successfully reposition themselves at crucial junctures in their career. The framework to study this repositioning has been adopted from the work of Chris Simms and Paul Trott (2007) who created it to study the brand repositioning of various consumer goods.

Findings

The literature establishes celebrities as brands. This study provides evidence that brand repositioning through reality television is possible for these celebrity brands. The symbolic and functional repositioning of these celebrities is presented through thematic content analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides a useful framework to understand celebrity brand repositioning through reality TV. It can also be replicated to understand the repositioning of a wide variety of celebrities other than film-stars such as sportspersons, social media influencers and politicians.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the need of expanding the corpus of Indian reality television and explains how Indian celebrities reposition themselves through reality television.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2010

Daniel Briggs

Increasingly, punitive policies on ‘poblematic’ pupils are implemented in poor‐performing UK urban state schools. While some are permanently excluded and referred to local…

Abstract

Increasingly, punitive policies on ‘poblematic’ pupils are implemented in poor‐performing UK urban state schools. While some are permanently excluded and referred to local authority educational alternatives, others are unofficially ‘excluded’ and referred to other forms of off‐site educational centres, where pupils receive a significantly reduced timetable, undertake unchallenging courses and are unlikely to return to school. Based on an ethnographic research project with 20 excluded young people in one south London borough, this paper will discuss what happens to these young people after their ‘exclusion’ from school. I will suggest that this form of unofficial ‘exclusion’ has significant life implications for these young people, contributing not only to their social exclusion, but also to their increased exposure to crime and victimisation. Moreover, their life options are truncated despite the efforts that they may make otherwise.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2011

Daniel Briggs

Purpose – UK urban state schools have recently experienced increased pressure to improve pupil performance levels and punitive policies appear to be one way of dealing…

Abstract

Purpose – UK urban state schools have recently experienced increased pressure to improve pupil performance levels and punitive policies appear to be one way of dealing with “problematic” young people. While some are permanently excluded for serious acts, others, who are by comparison less problematic, are unofficially “excluded” and referred to off-site educational provision (OSEP) where they receive reduced timetables and unchallenging courses. This research study set out to examine why 20 young people were “unofficially” excluded from school and their progress in OSEP.

Methodology – The study made use of ethnographic methods with 20 excluded young people in one south London borough in the UK. The research was undertaken from March 2009 to August 2009.

Findings – This chapter shows how “unofficial” exclusionary processes, to which these urban young people are exposed, have implications for their identity, self-worth and lifestyles, and makes them increasingly vulnerable to crime and victimization. The chapter makes use of labeling perspectives to understand the significance of the social reaction to deviant labels young people receive in school (Becker, 1953) and how they respond as a consequence (Lemert, 1972).

Details

The Well-Being, Peer Cultures and Rights of Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-075-9

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

Details

Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Henriette Lundgren, Brigitte Kroon and Rob F. Poell

While factors that influence test takers’ reactions to personality testing in selection contexts have been well researched, little empirical research evidence exists to…

Abstract

Purpose

While factors that influence test takers’ reactions to personality testing in selection contexts have been well researched, little empirical research evidence exists to determine whether these factors also apply to test takers’ reactions in the context of management development (MD). The purpose of this study is, therefore, to explore what explains different test takers’ reactions in the context of MD programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative longitudinal approach with three phases of data collection was used, resulting in participatory workshop observations and 11 semi-structured interviews with participants from two different contexts. Data were analyzed using Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA).

Findings

The findings show that test takers’ reactions vary; some are more accepting, others are more neutral or rejecting, where perceived usefulness, clarity of purpose and perceived respectfulness are identified as distinguishing factors. Individuals also differ in terms of their awareness of assumptions and their perceived emotional safety, two emerging factors that are relevant in the MD context.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected during the MD workshops and three months after, but no records of immediate test takers’ reactions were included, which could be an addition for future research.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that human resource development (HRD) professionals have significant impact on test takers’ reactions when it comes to encouraging self-reflection and learning along personality tests.

Originality/value

This study adds to existing research by offering insights into factors in MD settings where participants are concerned about aspects of fairness, learning and behavioral change.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Anne Perks, Mike Nolan, Tony Ryan, Pam Enderby, Isabel Hemmings and Karen Robinson

Respite care or ‘short breaks’ are currently heavily promoted as services to support older people and their carers. However, uptake of such services can be limited and…

Abstract

Respite care or ‘short breaks’ are currently heavily promoted as services to support older people and their carers. However, uptake of such services can be limited and there is a need to design models which are more flexible and responsive, and also reflect the ethos of personcentred care, which is currently one of the main drivers of health and social care policy in the UK. This paper describes the rationale for, and the philosophy behind, a new service for people with dementia and their carers recently established in Sheffield which provides respite care in the person's own home. The importance of user and carer involvement is highlighted and the need for new approaches to evaluation stressed.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Jim Maxon

The Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator is an extremely useful tool that can be used for career counselling, placement, quality circle teams, team development, and…

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2544

Abstract

The Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator is an extremely useful tool that can be used for career counselling, placement, quality circle teams, team development, and self‐understanding during career assessment. Experience derived from its use within such companies as Fine Fare Limited, Honeywell Control Systems Limited, Hewlett‐Packard Limited and also the EITB (Bristol office) shows that it is not a panacea for every organisation but it does allow positive development of individual strengths within teams. Organisations' usage of psychological instruments demonstrates acceptance of the value of people as a resource.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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