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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Mike Carr

Imagine a social inclusion project that encourages people recovering from mental distress to take risks. Suppose, too, that it was staffed by people with little prior…

Abstract

Imagine a social inclusion project that encourages people recovering from mental distress to take risks. Suppose, too, that it was staffed by people with little prior experience of working in mental health services. That's the unorthodox approach taken by the Mainstream project. Mike Carr explains how it works and how, despite initial scepticism from some mental health practitioners, they have amassed a clear body of evidence to show that it works.

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A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

David Smallbone, Robert Baldock and Mike Bridge

This paper reviews the first year experience of a programme (Backing Winners), launched by North Yorkshire TEC in 1995 to provide support for new and young businesses with…

Abstract

This paper reviews the first year experience of a programme (Backing Winners), launched by North Yorkshire TEC in 1995 to provide support for new and young businesses with growth potential. The Backing Winners (BW) programme differs from previous schemes in that it is not restricted to clients who are unemployed, it provides access to some key business services (such as office services), and there is no grant offered to individual businesses. Delivery of BW is focused on Personal Business Mentors (PBMs) whose role is similar to that of the PBA in Business Links. Based on a survey of 144 clients businesses and interviews with representatives of each of the Enterprise Agencies (EAs) contracted to deliver BW, the conclusion is that it was successful during the first year of its operation. Clients were very satisfied with their PBMs and some were active users of group training and office services. The paper also considers a number of policy issues raised by the study. These include broad issues such as the extent to which there is a case for targeting support on new and young firms such as these, and the extent to which the operation of a selective approach at the start‐up stage involves “picking winners”. In addition, BW raises a number of delivery issues which include: the need for adequate resourcing to enable the workload of PBMs (or PBAs) to be compatible with effective delivery; the need to reconsider the use of freelance consultants as PBMs (or PBAs); the need to recognise that many small manufacturing firms have sector‐specific support requirements; the need to set performance targets to agencies contracted to deliver such programmes, which recognise differences between agencies and their catchments.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Simon Halstead, Alyson Cahill, Lalini Fernando and Mike Isweran

Thirty‐five patients who had received at least one year's treatment in a learning‐disability medium secure unit were followed up for a maximum of five years. A good…

Abstract

Thirty‐five patients who had received at least one year's treatment in a learning‐disability medium secure unit were followed up for a maximum of five years. A good treatment outcome was more common in those with significant learning disability. At the end of follow‐up, 21 subjects (60%) were living in the community with support. The early months after discharge were a peak period for relapse. A very low level of reconviction was found, affecting only one subject. Patients who were older on discharge were less likely to re‐offend. The two deaths that occurred during follow‐up, and the three patients who required special (high security) hospital referral, are reported in detail. The findings are contrasted with the only comparable study (Day, 1988).

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Adam Pozner, Judith Hammond, Mee Ng and TriNova

Abstract

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A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1989

Ian Cowburn, David F. Cheshire, Mike Cornford and Sandra Vogel

Considered going to IFLA 89 in Paris, but as noted in leading article in August, the fee of 2,200 francs would pay for a first class run around the Hexagon with SNCF for…

Abstract

Considered going to IFLA 89 in Paris, but as noted in leading article in August, the fee of 2,200 francs would pay for a first class run around the Hexagon with SNCF for nine days with all sorts of extras and still leave enough for five good dinners. Expostulating thus to NLW's Favourite Overseas Librarian, Frances Salinié of the British Council in Paris, led her to make enquiry. Transpired, as they say, that belatedly and all unannounced one‐day registration at 300 francs was allowed. This possibility, the fact that I hadn't been to Paris this year, the near certainty that one day of IFLA would be an “elegant sufficiency” and a curiosity to see if “they order this matter… better in France” led me to the Gare du Nord clutching my 300 dirty oncers. Warning: lengthy chunk of political bias coming up. Don't bother to take reading matter on the London Dover/Folkestone railway. The swaying, clattering, noisome line makes reading, conversation or walkman listening virtually impossible. This chunk of Network Southeast is not a worthy descendant of the South‐Eastern and Chatham railway on which long dead father once drove beautiful locomotives. A pride in railways is one of the Victorian values not preached from the Downing Street pulpit. The new line promised for the Tunnel may sometime let you read in comfort, but that seems a rather drastic and expensive remedy.

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New Library World, vol. 90 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Laurence Kimmel, Mike Barnard and Aysu Kuru

The cultural imperative for public buildings in countries like Australia to maintain their intrinsic “openness” – physically and symbolically – faces particular challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The cultural imperative for public buildings in countries like Australia to maintain their intrinsic “openness” – physically and symbolically – faces particular challenges in the context of current global terrorism concerns. Building regulations and counter-terrorism guidelines coexist uneasily, with implications for both public amenity and safety. This is particularly evident in the context of current approaches to hostile vehicle (HV) mitigation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of comparative literature, this multidisciplinary project assimilates design aesthetics and security expertise to assess the advantages and limitations of current counter-terrorism design approaches in Australia, the UK and the USA. The research focusses on public buildings of high cultural symbolic value (e.g. concert halls) in the context of HV mitigation.

Findings

Two key recommendations emerge. The first presents the benefits of adopting a layered security strategy tailored to a building's security and symbolic profile mix. The second proposes enhancements to the existing counter-terrorism guidelines based on a model that accounts for both symbolic value and openness.

Originality/value

The research presents new strategies for urban design and security stakeholders to balance openness and security in the design of publicly accessible buildings. While existing research addresses the challenges of terrorism in the design of public space, a literature (and practice) gap exists in Australia, the UK and the USA regarding current approaches to the design of public buildings. Using Australia as a case study, the findings will inform government and industry practitioners seeking more complementary approaches to public amenity and safety in comparable counter-security design contexts globally.

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Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Lorenzo Massa, Federica Farneti and Beatrice Scappini

– The aim of this study is to shed light on the mechanisms involved in, and consequences of, developing a sustainability report in a small to medium enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to shed light on the mechanisms involved in, and consequences of, developing a sustainability report in a small to medium enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research is used to provide insights into the initial stages of the development of the sustainability report and its consequences. “Mike” is an Italian small organisation with a sustainability orientation selling products and services about wellness and health. It decided to develop a sustainability report in 2013.

Findings

The authors find that the organisation’s initial aim to report on its sustainability later extended beyond disclosure to using the information to enhance its sustainable development approach and awareness, consider long-term planning, support strategy-making based on the sustainable development concept and establish and enhance its reputation.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the analysis of only one small Italian organisation and as such cannot claim generalisability of its findings.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that the sustainability initiative of this organisation, while originally focussed on reporting, evolved into strategy and planning. Managers in similar organisations may learn from this experience to focus on strategy-making and social and environmental value creation.

Originality/value

The study examines sustainability reporting in the previously overlooked area of small and medium enterprises.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2014

Jonathan S. Coley

Social movement scholars have increasingly drawn attention to the process of “bridge building” in social movements – that is, the process by which activists attempt to…

Abstract

Social movement scholars have increasingly drawn attention to the process of “bridge building” in social movements – that is, the process by which activists attempt to resolve conflicts stemming from different collective identities. However, most scholars assume that social movements primarily attempt to resolve tensions among activists themselves, and thus that bridge building is a means to other ends rather than a primary goal of social movement activism. In this chapter, I challenge these assumptions through a case study of a “bridging organization” known as Bridge Builders, which sought as its primary goal to “bridge the gap between the LGBT and Christian communities” at a Christian university in Nashville, Tennessee. I highlight the mechanisms by which Bridge Builders attempted to facilitate bridge building at the university, and I argue that Bridge Builders succeeded in bridging (a) disparate institutional identities at their university, (b) “structural holes” between LGBT- and religious-identified groups at their university, and (c) oppositional personal identities among organizational members. As I discuss in the conclusion, the case of Bridge Builders has implications for literatures on bridge building in social movements, cultural and biographical consequences of social movements, and social movement strategy.

Details

Intersectionality and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-105-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Peter Lindsell and Mike Mulheron

Introduction In a recent paper in this journal, Campbell outlined some of the techniques and problems associated with the demolition of existing structures and touched…

Abstract

Introduction In a recent paper in this journal, Campbell outlined some of the techniques and problems associated with the demolition of existing structures and touched upon the possibility of recycling the debris from this process. This reflects the growing awareness among the general public, local authorities and central Government that the recycling of waste materials, from all sources, is both necessary and desirable. Indeed, according to a recently published report from the Trade and Industry Committee of the House of Commons: ‘The benefits of recycling are obvious: rarely do environ‐mental and economic factors so unambiguously support the same goal’.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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