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1 – 10 of 26
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Mike Beverland and Philip Bretherton

With the emergence of relationship marketing there has been an increased focus on the use of inter‐firm relationships or strategic alliances in delivering a total service…

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Abstract

With the emergence of relationship marketing there has been an increased focus on the use of inter‐firm relationships or strategic alliances in delivering a total service package to the consumer. Despite a number of studies, there is still much to be learned about why alliances form and why they take the form they do. Based upon case based methodology this research argues that the formation of strategic alliances is a due to firms seeking out new market opportunities under conditions of increased uncertainty and competition. We integrate resource dependence views of alliance formation with those of Austrian economics and argue that alliances are a means of reducing the uncertainty that surrounds the undertaking of new market opportunities.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Darina Hoffman, Mike Beverland and Michelle Rasmussen

The wine sectors in Australia and New Zealand have developed a number of regional events in order to promote wine and build regional identity. Despite the popularity and…

Abstract

The wine sectors in Australia and New Zealand have developed a number of regional events in order to promote wine and build regional identity. Despite the popularity and long history of these events little research has been carried out on their role in wine marketing strategy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and evolution of regional wine events from a strategic perspective. Findings are based upon seven case studies from Australia and New Zealand. The authors argue that over time events evolve through a series of stages from regional awareness through to brand enhancement and customer loyalty. Implications of these changes for winery management and event organisers are explored.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Mike Beverland

The arguments for increased focus by vineyards on the development of wine tourism activities have received increased attention in the last five years. Wineries have often…

Abstract

The arguments for increased focus by vineyards on the development of wine tourism activities have received increased attention in the last five years. Wineries have often been criticised for not focusing enough attention on developing networks with tourist organisations, local governments, and cellar door activity in general. This approach ignores both the wider market context within which New Zealand wineries operate and the associated opportunity costs of developing wine tourism facilities. This research seeks to place wine tourism within the general market context in New Zealand. We present the results of qualitative interviews with key industry players and argue that wine tourism facilities may be under‐developed precisely because wineries are having more success in export markets which provide greater returns than cellar door sales.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Mike Beverland

The US wine market is one of the most heavily regulated in the world with government regulation requiring exporters to go through a three tier distribution system. Coupled…

Abstract

The US wine market is one of the most heavily regulated in the world with government regulation requiring exporters to go through a three tier distribution system. Coupled with geographic fragmentation, high transportation costs, and a significant degree of uncertainty, this represents a significant barrier to entry for small producers. As the wine market becomes more and more competitive, the ability to enter the world's second wealthiest wine market will be critical to continued market success. One way of circumventing market entry barriers and complying with government regulation is the formation of a strategic alliance with a home country distributor. This paper presents a case study in how one company, Montana Wines of New Zealand, formed an alliance with Seagrams Chateau in the US. The secret to success is to find the right fit between the philosophies and culture of each partner.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Len Tiu Wright

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Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Karen V. Fernandez and Michael B. Beverland

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the material nature of legacy technology makes its users passionately prefer it over its digital alternatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the material nature of legacy technology makes its users passionately prefer it over its digital alternatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This ethnographic study uses data from 26 in-depth interviews with vinyl collectors, augmented with longitudinal participant–observation of vinyl collecting and music store events.

Findings

The findings reveal how the physicality of vinyl facilitates the passionate relationships (with music, the vinyl as performative object and other people) that make vinyl so significant in vinyl users’ lives.

Research limitations/implications

As this study examines a single research context (vinyl) from the perspective of participants from three developed, Anglophone nations, its key theoretical contributions should be examined in other technological contexts and other cultures.

Practical implications

The findings imply that miniturisation and automation have lower limits for some products, material attributes should be added to digitised products and that legacy technology products could be usually be reframed as tools of authentic self-expression.

Originality/value

This study explains what can happen beyond the top of the “S” curve in the Technology Acceptance Model, furthering our understanding of consumers’ reactions to the proliferation of digital technology in their lives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2022

André Spicer, Pınar Cankurtaran and Michael B. Beverland

Consecration is the process by which producers in creative fields become canonized as “greats.” However, is this the end of the story? Research on consecration focuses on…

Abstract

Consecration is the process by which producers in creative fields become canonized as “greats.” However, is this the end of the story? Research on consecration focuses on the drivers of consecration but pays little attention to the post-consecration period. Furthermore, the research ignores the dynamics of consecration. To address these gaps, we examine the changing fortunes of a consecrated artist – the musician Phil Collins. We identify the ways in which three actors (fans, critics, and peers) assemble for consecration, disassemble for deconsecration, and reassemble for reconsecration. Examining the changing public image and commercial fortunes of Collins as a solo artist between 1980 and 2020, we identify an N-shaped process of rise-fall-rise that we call the Phil Collins Effect. This effect offers a new way of thinking about how cultural producers gain, lose and regain status in their fields.

Details

The Generation, Recognition and Legitimation of Novelty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-998-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Mike Schallehn, Christoph Burmann and Nicola Riley

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of brand authenticity and analyze the antecedents and effects of the construct. Although there is no doubt about the…

10857

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of brand authenticity and analyze the antecedents and effects of the construct. Although there is no doubt about the relevance of authenticity in personal relationships, published research has yet not thoroughly explored the concept’s meaning in reference to brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on socio-psychological attribution theories and grounding on the identity-based brand management approach, a causal model of brand authenticity is developed. The hypothesized relationships are analyzed using the partial-least-squares approach. The primary data are based on an online survey conducted in Germany (n = 600). The respondents were asked about fast-food and beer brands.

Findings

The data show that brand authenticity positively impacts on brand trust. Furthermore, the key antecedents in the model (consistency, continuity and individuality of a brand) drive the perception of brand authenticity as hypothesized.

Research limitations/implications

The model should be tested in further product categories and moderators should be integrated.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that authenticity is perceived when a brand is consistent, continuous and individual in its behavior. Nevertheless, the empirical results indicate that the factor individuality has the lowest influence on perceived brand authenticity. This is an interesting finding, as being “unique” is commonly regarded as an important success factor in branding. Although the study’s findings confirm its relevancy, they relativize its importance: being consistent, meaning that a brand fulfills its brand promise at every brand-touch point, and being continuous, meaning that the brand promise reflects the essential core of the brand, are of major importance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Shayan Fouladi, Amir Ekhlassi and Kamal Sakhdari

This paper aims to determine the affecting factors of the brand authenticity of startups in social media.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the affecting factors of the brand authenticity of startups in social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative method based on a grounded theory approach, this research specifies and classifies the affecting factors of brand authenticity of startups in social media through in-depth semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Multiple factors affecting the brand authenticity of startups in social media are determined and categorized as indexical, iconic and existential cues through this research. Connection to heritage and having credible support are determined as indexical cues. Founder intellectuality, brand intellectuality, commitment toward customers and proactive clear and interesting communications are identified as iconic cues. Having self-confidence and self-satisfaction, having intimacy with the brand and a joyful feeling for interactions with the community around the brand are determined as existential cues in this research. This research furthers previous arguments on a multiplicity of brand authenticity by shedding light on the relationship between the different aspects of authenticity and the form that different affecting factors can be organized together. Consumers eventually evaluate a strengthened perception of brand authenticity through existential cues that reflect the cues of other aspects (iconic and indexical) which passed through the goal-based assessment and self-authentication filter.

Research limitations/implications

The research sampling population can be more diversified in terms of sociodemographic attributes. Due to the qualitative methodology of this research, assessment of the findings through quantitative methods can be considered in future research.

Practical implications

Using the findings of this research, startup managers can properly build a perception of authenticity in their consumers’ minds by using alternate factors while lacking major indexical cues such as heritage. This research helps startup businesses to design their brand communications better to convey their authenticity to their audiences.

Originality/value

This research determines the factors affecting the authenticity of startup brands in social media. It also defines the process of authenticity perception through different aspects of brand authenticity.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

1 – 10 of 26