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Article

ANDREW ADAMS and SETH ARMITAGE

The mutualisation of two English third division football clubs in 2001 and the creation of a large number of supporters' trusts make it timely to consider whether there is…

Abstract

The mutualisation of two English third division football clubs in 2001 and the creation of a large number of supporters' trusts make it timely to consider whether there is a case for mutualisation of football clubs. This paper assesses whether mutuality would be of economic benefit for clubs, drawing heavily on the experience of mutuals in the financial sector. Our conclusions are mixed. The economic case rests on the distinctive feature of customer loyalty to a club, presuming this to be much stronger than loyalty to a financial institution. However, club members in a mutual must expect to be called upon to provide financial support.

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Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article

Mike Adams

Drawing a framework from Gibbins et al. (1990), uses information collected from field interviews to isolate those factors which influence the voluntary disclosure…

Abstract

Drawing a framework from Gibbins et al. (1990), uses information collected from field interviews to isolate those factors which influence the voluntary disclosure practices of New Zealand life insurance companies. Interview evidence suggests that voluntary disclosure is a multi‐dimensional phenomenon that is influenced by both firm‐specific antecedents such as company culture and environmental conditions, for example, the state of market competition. Gibbins et al. (1990) refer to these organizational and environmental determinants of corporate disclosure as ritualism and opportunism. The results of this study thus provide important insights into the voluntary disclosure practices of life insurance companies. Also concludes that field‐based research carried out within a sound conceptual framework could make a valuable contribution to the accounting literature and complement the results obtained in studies utilizing more conventional statistical techniques.

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Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article

Olajumoke Olaosebikan and Mike Adams

The purpose of this study was to, using a case study research design informed by organizational economics theory, to examine the prospects for micro-insurance in promoting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to, using a case study research design informed by organizational economics theory, to examine the prospects for micro-insurance in promoting micro-credit in a low-income Anglophone country in sub-Saharan Africa – The Gambia. Two main research questions are addressed: first, what is the most appropriate micro-finance institution (MFI) organizational structure to maximize the economic benefits of micro-insurance? Second, what are the financial management and wider economic benefits of the use of micro-insurance by MFIs?

Design/methodology/approach

To address our two research questions, we used a semi-structured interview protocol, informed by the organizational economics literature, to interpret the data collected from our field cases. We believe that these intrinsic qualities of case study methodology are particularly apt in the present study, given the complex and emergent nature of micro-finance and micro-insurance in low-income countries such The Gambia. By focusing on case studies in a single country, we also to some extent help control for variations in business environment that could confound interpretations of field data obtained from different jurisdictions.

Findings

The results of our study suggest that the mutual (cooperative) structure of credit unions is likely to be the most cost-efficient and effective organizational form for reducing information asymmetries, agency problems and transaction costs. We also observe that micro-insurance can help reduce the risk of loan defaults, thereby increasing returns on savings and lowering the costs of debt. As such, micro-insurance stimulates the demand–supply of financial intermediation in less developed countries and so helps promote economic development. In addition to contributing new insights, our findings have potentially important commercial and public policy implications.

Research limitations/implications

We acknowledge that our research is subject to inherent limitations such as the focus on three interviews in three different types of MFI organization while excluding other structural forms of organization such as government-owned/sponsored organizations. Nonetheless, the organizational characteristics of the cases examined in the present study are representative of most MFIs in developing countries. Given the prevalent hierarchical nature of corporate systems in sub-Saharan Africa, the views of the interviewees are also deemed to reflect those of other board members. Nonetheless, we acknowledge that the conclusions from our research may need to be tempered in line with these inherent limitations with the research approach adopted.

Practical implications

The insights obtained from our Gambia-based research could be generalized to developing countries elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, and indeed, other parts of the developing world. Consequently, the study could be of interest and relevance to international financiers (e.g. the World Bank), aid agencies, governments and other development organizations.

Originality/value

Despite its evident business and development potential, academic management research on micro-insurance, and in particular, its role in supporting micro-finance initiatives, is still very much at an embryonic stage. Our study thus seeks to fill this knowledge gap.

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Abstract

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Work Study, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article

Terence Gould

Three examples are given of the work of QueenAlexandra College for the Blind in Birmingham. ACommercial Studies course which helps visuallyhandicapped students to cope in…

Abstract

Three examples are given of the work of Queen Alexandra College for the Blind in Birmingham. A Commercial Studies course which helps visually handicapped students to cope in a workplace environment is described. The students learn to use office machines and all students have three weeks′ work experience.

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Education + Training, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Bruce Burton

Abstract

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article

Chun-Keung (Stan) Hoi, Jun Xiong and Hong Zou

Taking advantage of the 2008 Sichuan Great Earthquake as a natural experiment, the purpose of this paper is to examine the motives and effects of corporate donations by…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking advantage of the 2008 Sichuan Great Earthquake as a natural experiment, the purpose of this paper is to examine the motives and effects of corporate donations by focusing on how firm ownership identity as the first-order governance mechanism affects the motives and effects of disaster relief donations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct regressions and market event studies, and use matching to address the confounding effects of differences in firm characteristics.

Findings

The authors hypothesize that private firms that are better governed than state-owned enterprises (SOEs) are more likely to donate for value maximization. Consistent with this, the authors find that private firms are more likely to donate to the 2008 Sichuan earthquake and donate more than SOEs. The effects of secondary governance variables in the donation determinant models (e.g. board independence and managerial ownership) are more consistent with the value maximization argument. While short-term market reaction to donation announcement is not significant for private firms, it is lower when SOEs make a large donation. Consistent with the hypothesis, the authors find that over the 24–36 months following the donation, private donors realize a higher abnormal stock return.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the debate over the merits/costs of corporate donations and helps better understand how SOEs and private firms (particularly family-owned firms) differ in their governance and financial decision-making.

Practical implications

Both managers from private firms and SOEs can use the findings of this study to better guide their donation and other philanthropic decisions.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine both the motives and effects of corporate donations by both private and SOEs taking advantage of the 2008 Sichuan, thereby significantly extending prior related studies.

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China Finance Review International, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

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Book part

Amy Affelt

Abstract

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All That's Not Fit to Print
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-361-7

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