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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Miguel Ángel Sastre Castillo and Ignacio Danvila Del Valle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI), organizational affective commitment (AC), and performance at low-skilled…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI), organizational affective commitment (AC), and performance at low-skilled back office positions.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 397 participants in low-skilled back office positions from a service company completed a questionnaire assessing EI, AC, and performance. The authors used multiple regression models for testing whether higher levels of EI and AC predicted better performance. Additionally, they tested to see whether EI and AC were positively related.

Findings

The results showed that workers in low-skilled back office positions with higher EI and AC had better performance. In this sense, intrapersonal skills and mood management were the dimensions of EI with the highest predictive power. Also, EI and AC were positively related, with intrapersonal skills and adaptability being the dimensions of EI most closely associated with AC. Finally, the predictive power on performance was increased when EI and AC were considered simultaneously.

Originality/value

Traditionally, the involvement of EI and other personal dimensions in increasing organizational commitment and better work performance has been studied in high-skilled and executive positions, as well as in front office low-skilled positions. However, there is little empirical evidence regarding the simultaneous influence of EI and AC on performance in low-skilled back office positions. This gap prompted this research, which suggests that the investment of organizational resources is mandatory for improving EI and, hence, organizational commitment and work performance in these employees.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Maria Rita Blanco, Miguel Angel Sastre-Castillo and Maria Angeles Montoro-Sanchez

This article explores the influence of education and experience on the time to the top in family and non-family CEOs who work for Latin American family firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the influence of education and experience on the time to the top in family and non-family CEOs who work for Latin American family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve these objectives, this study draws upon human capital theory as well as career and family firm literature. The careers of 129 CEOs of family firms who form part of the América Economía ranking were analyzed and quantitative methods were used.

Findings

In Latin American family firms, family CEOs reach the top faster than their non-family counterparts. In addition, the influence of human capital variables on the way to the top differs between the two groups. For family CEOs, obtaining a graduate degree delays the way to the top, while for non-family ones, it reduces the time to the top. As regards experience, for promoted family CEOs, the greater the percentage of the career spent in the organization they lead, the shorter the time to the top. No support was found for either the influence of having worked for just one firm or having had elite graduate education abroad, in multilatina CEOs.

Practical implications

Individual career management suggestions for future CEOs as well as specific guidelines for talent managers are proposed

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the influence of human capital indicators on the time to the top in Latin American family firm CEOs.

Propósito

Este artículo explora la influencia de la educación y la experiencia sobre el “time to the top” de los Gerentes Generales, miembros de la familia y no miembros, quienes trabajan para empresas familiares latinoamericanas.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Para lograr estos objetivos, este estudio se basa en la teoría de capital humano y la literatura sobre carreras y empresas familiares. Fueron analizadas las carreras de 129 Gerentes Generales de empresas familiares, integrantes del ranking América Economía, y se utilizaron métodos cuantitativos.

Resultados

En las empresas familiares latinoamericanas, los Gerentes Generales miembros de la familia llegan más rápido a la cima que los no miembros, y la influencia de las variables de capital humano en el “time to the top” difiere entre ambos grupos. Para los Gerentes Generales familiares, los estudios de posgrado retrasan el “time to the top”, mientras que, para los no familiares, lo reducen. En cuanto a la experiencia, para los Gerentes Generales que han sido promovidos, cuanto mayor es el porcentaje de carrera invertido en la organización, menor es el “time to the top”. No se obtuvo respaldo para las hipótesis sobre la influencia de trabajar en única firma o el posgrado de élite en el extranjero, en este último caso para los Gerentes Generales de multilatinas.

Implicancias prácticas

Se ofrecen sugerencias de gestión de carrera a nivel individual para futuros ejecutivos, así como lineamientos para los gerentes de talento.

Originalidad/valor

Este es el primer estudio que explora la influencia de los indicadores de capital humano sobre el “time to the top” de Gerentes Generales de empresas familiares latinoamericanas.

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Maria Rita Blanco and Miguel Angel Sastre Castillo

This study investigates the influence of experience – organisational tenure, international experience and springboard role – upon Chief Executive Officers’ (CEOs) time to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the influence of experience – organisational tenure, international experience and springboard role – upon Chief Executive Officers’ (CEOs) time to the top and the time taken by CEOs to reach that position. As work and careers are embedded in economic and institutional environments, although prior Western career studies have explored this relationship, this study aims to determine the suitability of experience as a human capital attribute to explain CEO career success in Latin American firms.

Design/methodology/approach

169 Latin American firms were considered (America Economia, 2014). Biographical data about CEOs were manually collected and systematically crosschecked, and multiple hierarchical regressions were employed.

Findings

Organisational tenure and lifetime experience were found to reduce the time to the top. International experience delays the time to the top. International assignments closer to HQ do not exert an influence on time to the top. In multilatinas, promoted CEOs who have held Corporate springboard roles get faster to the top than those having held Divisional positions. Findings offer partial support to the human capital theory experience in Latin America, stressing the relevance of cultural, socio-economic and institutional factors.

Practical implications

The identification of career success predictors may enhance the career decision-making processes of individuals and organisations.

Originality/value

This study contributes to human capital and career literature, being the first one to explore the relationship between experience and time to the top in CEOs working for Latin American firms.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Ignacio Danvila del Valle, Miguel Ángel Sastre Castillo and Antonio Rodríguez‐Duarte

The aim of this paper is to determine whether the effort invested by service companies in employee training has an impact on their economic performance.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine whether the effort invested by service companies in employee training has an impact on their economic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study centres on an intensive labor sector, where the perception of service quality depends on who renders this service. To overcome the habitual problems of transversal studies, the time effect has been considered by measuring data over a period of nine years, to give panel data treatment with fixed effects.

Findings

The prepared models give clear empirical support to the hypothesis that training activities are a positive influence on company performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results obtained contribute empirical evidence about a relationship that, hitherto, has not been satisfactorily demonstrated. However, there may be some limitations related to the use of a training indicator based on effort and not on results obtained, with low representation of what happens in the smaller companies that lack structured training policies, or with no differentiation between generic or more specific training.

Practical implications

The results obtained can contribute towards increased manager awareness that training should be treated as an investment and not considered as an expense.

Originality/value

The main contributions can be resumed in three points: a training measurement has been used, based on three dimensions, which presumes to be an improvement on the more frequent method of measuring this variable. A consistent methodology was used that previously was not applied in the analysis of this relationship, and clear empirical evidence has been obtained concerning a relationship that, frequently, is mentioned with theoretical arguments, but which needs more empirical evidence.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

María Teresa Méndez Picazo

450

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Antonio Ortega‐Parra and Miguel Ángel SastreCastillo

Previous research demonstrates the link between corporate culture and organizational commitment. Given the potential differences in espoused corporate culture and its…

8930

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research demonstrates the link between corporate culture and organizational commitment. Given the potential differences in espoused corporate culture and its perception by employees, the purpose of this paper is to find an answer to the following question: how does employees' perception of company values affect their own commitment to that organization?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey to 216 business leaders, using three types of questionnaires to collect data: values, HR practices and commitment. They designed ad hoc the questionnaires on values and HR practices, and the last one follows Allen and Meyer's model. Hypotheses were tested by using correlations, regression analysis, structural equation modeling and comparisons of averages.

Findings

The results confirm the authors' hypothesis: a better adjustment between the perceived and the stated values has a positive relation with commitment. Particularly, people‐oriented values and ethical behavior are the ones that best predict affective commitment. The study verifies, also, that appropriate human resources practices greatly affect the perception of values.

Practical implications

The greater importance of affective dimension in organizational commitment, reinforced by ethical and people‐oriented values, makes clear the need for companies to pay real attention to this set of values beyond the simple formulation in the corporate culture. Therefore, companies should ensure there is congruence between human resources practices and values statements.

Originality/value

There are many previous research studies analyzing the link between corporate culture and commitment. This paper focuses on the existing gap between the espoused and the perceived values, finding that a better adjustment has a positive relation with organizational commitment.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Miguel Ángel Calderón Molina, José Manuel Hurtado González, Beatriz Palacios Florencio and José Luis Galán González

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence that balanced scorecard (BSC) adoption has on organizational climate, employees’ commitment, job satisfaction and job…

3264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence that balanced scorecard (BSC) adoption has on organizational climate, employees’ commitment, job satisfaction and job dedication.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire sent to the employees working in a retail sector firm, at two different moments in time, between the years 2009 and 2010. A total of 494 questionnaires were correctly returned. The response rates were 55.6 and 60.2 percent respectively. Tests (ANOVA) were carried out related to the constructs which make up the model studied, before and after the BSC implementation.

Findings

The results indicate a clear relationship with the satisfaction of employees within the organization; it shows that the BSC implementation is significantly related to positive employees’ affective reactions.

Originality/value

The outcomes of the study are relevant both to the literature on strategic change and business management, since they determine that the correct implementation of the BSC causes a significant change in the employees’ behavior and attitudes toward the firm's strategic objectives.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Valentina Cillo, Gian Luca Gregori, Lucia Michela Daniele, Francesco Caputo and Nathalie Bitbol-Saba

Through the human resources (HR) and knowledge management (KM) perspective as human-centric processes, the aim of this study is to explore how companies’ engagement in…

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Abstract

Purpose

Through the human resources (HR) and knowledge management (KM) perspective as human-centric processes, the aim of this study is to explore how companies’ engagement in diversity (DIV), inclusion (INC) and people empowerment (PEMP) policies influences companies’ organizational performance, to support organizations in the shift to the Industry 5.0 framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining the HR management and the KM-driven organizational culture, a conceptual model is proposed for explaining companies’ higher organizational performance. Proposed hypotheses are tested with reference to a set of listed international companies traced by Refinitiv on a five-year time horizon (2016–2020) through 24,196 firm-year observations.

Findings

This research shows that companies engaged in DIV policies, INC practices and PEMP through education have higher profitability and are more valued by capital markets’ investors.

Originality/value

This paper draws attention to the need to overcome the reductionist view of HR and rethink KM architecture to cope with the growing challenge of HR integration according to the Industry 5.0 paradigm.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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