Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Miflora M. Gatchalian

Among the many tools available for measurement of human perceptions of product and service quality, sensory evaluation methods have been found to be most useful…

2623

Abstract

Among the many tools available for measurement of human perceptions of product and service quality, sensory evaluation methods have been found to be most useful, particularly for food and related products. In fact, sensory evaluation has been defined as a “scientific discipline used to evoke, measure, analyze and interpret sensations as they are perceived by the senses of sight, smell, taste, touch and hearing”. The practice was elevated to the realm of science largely because its practice can be made as precise as an instrument giving results which are consistent, reliable and valid. Some examples of sensory evaluation methods useful for food and non‐food products include product profiling through quantitative descriptive analysis, ranking for preference, triangle test for difference and hedonic rating scale for product acceptability measurement. The design for each of these “sensory measuring instruments” and the selection and preparation of samples for assessment are statistically‐based. Likewise, the methods of analysis and interpretation of results utilize tests of hypothesis and other statistical approaches.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Miflora M. Gatchalian

TQM is a philosophy which emphasizes continuous improvement as a process that places a premium on achievement of customer satisfaction. This requires participation of…

3496

Abstract

TQM is a philosophy which emphasizes continuous improvement as a process that places a premium on achievement of customer satisfaction. This requires participation of everyone in the company in the development of shared mission, vision, plans and in the quest for continuous improvement. Employees must, therefore, become management’s partners in meeting the ultimate goal of delighting the customers. Such partnerships will require concerted efforts towards the acquisition of knowledge and skills in meeting day‐to‐day problems and making fast but low‐risk decisions. The odds for TQM success are not very encouraging at this point in time, since surveys show that the proportion of successes in TQM implementation is only within the range of 20 to 35 per cent of those who have initiated the practice. It appears that the typical approach to TQM implementation in the company may need to be further reviewed and the basis for improvement properly identified and/or designed to truly fit the company’s requirements. Correct problem identification and rectification leading to continuous improvement can only be achieved through effective people empowerment.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

W.L. Hurd

Describes the origin and growth of the Asia Pacific Quality Control Organization (APQCO) from its inception in 1981, its formal initiation in 1985 and its development to…

Abstract

Describes the origin and growth of the Asia Pacific Quality Control Organization (APQCO) from its inception in 1981, its formal initiation in 1985 and its development to the present. The APQCO is a federation of national quality organizations within the Asia Pacific region. It is patterned after the highly effective European Organization for Quality (EOQ). As the nations of the Asia Pacific region continued to industrialize, it was both timely and appropriate that their national quality organizations should form a federation to exchange information and to work together for their mutual benefit. Contains some speculation about the future of the APQCO.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3