Search results

1 – 10 of 139
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Allison Carr, Yeon Ho Shin and Kimberly Severt

This study aims to examine the predictors of microbrewery consumers’ intentions to visit microbreweries using an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) and to assess…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the predictors of microbrewery consumers’ intentions to visit microbreweries using an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) and to assess the gaps between attribute importance and performance by performing importance-performance analysis (IPA) on the beerscape measure.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was administered to visitors of microbreweries within a southern US state. A total of 200 responses were selected based on completion and were analyzed using structural equation modeling and an IPA analysis.

Findings

Self-identity, attitude and perceived behavioral controls were found to be significant predictors of microbrewery consumers’ intentions. The subjective norm was insignificant following the addition of self-identity. Furthermore, the beerscape was not a significant predictor of microbrewery consumers’ attitudes. The IPA found that microbreweries should improve beer value, beer cost, variety of beers and the embodiment of local culture in the atmosphere.

Originality/value

To the researcher’s knowledge, this is the first quantitative study to successfully apply the TPB framework and develop the beerscape in the microbrewery context. The results of this study provide useful information to microbrewery owners and operators, which ultimately helps them serve their consumers more effectively.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Victoria Ellis and Gary Bosworth

The UK has seen rapid growth in the number of microbreweries but a concurrent decline in public house numbers raising concerns about the sustainability of this growth. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK has seen rapid growth in the number of microbreweries but a concurrent decline in public house numbers raising concerns about the sustainability of this growth. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of funding upon competition in the sector and the entrepreneurial characteristics of microbrewers. With an emphasis on rural-based businesses, the local economic impacts are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is informed by analysis of trends in both the brewing and public house sectors in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with microbrewers, including five who had received funding to support their development. These were supplemented with three days of participant observation at collaborative brewing events with 26 microbrewery owners and three microbrewery managers.

Findings

The findings indicate that the value attached to microbreweries extends beyond their economic contribution with wider outcomes including training and job creation, the preservation of listed buildings and the enhancement of rural tourism. Funding stimulated entrepreneurial responses but support for these wider outcomes ran the risk of distorting competition.

Originality/value

As competition increases in the sector, microbrewery owners need to become more entrepreneurial to maintain their market position. Competition is heightened by a number of lifestyle enterprises that can survive with lower profit levels while routes to market are limited by a decline in the public house sector. In such a pressured market, there is a need for clearer assessments of the impacts on local economies and entrepreneurship when grant funding is provided.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Roberto Esposti, Matteo Fastigi and Elena Viganò

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the emergence of microbreweries in Italy over the last 20 years (period 1993-2014) and assess its main determinants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the emergence of microbreweries in Italy over the last 20 years (period 1993-2014) and assess its main determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

The recent intense growth is expressed by the increasing number of entries in the sector actually accompanied, in most recent years, by an increasing number of exits. The paper proposes a quantitative assessment of this entry-exit dynamics through a sequence of econometric models known as survival models.

Findings

Together with two other orders of possible determinants (idiosyncratic characteristics and the exogenous evolution of the beer market), the paper assesses the role played by specific geographical and local factors within these dynamics. Estimation results show that, whereas market force and individual features unquestionably affect entry and exit choices, geographical and local factors are of limited relevance, especially for the recent entry dynamics.

Originality/value

Although the literature on the so-called craft beer revolution is already vast and increasing, the novel contribution of the paper concerns the specificity (if any) of the Italian case and the role of spatial factors in this respect. This investigation is performed adopting an advanced quantitative approach and this attempt is also quite original within this literature.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Vincenzo Alfeo, Aldo Todaro, Giuseppina Migliore, Valeria Borsellino and Emanuele Schimmenti

This paper aims to illustrate the organisational and managing models characterising the craft beer producers in Sicily (Southern Italy) and the main issues of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the organisational and managing models characterising the craft beer producers in Sicily (Southern Italy) and the main issues of the provision of raw materials.

Design/methodology/approach

A direct survey involving the overall population of 41 craft breweries operating in Sicily in 2016 was carried out. Then 29 questionnaires were collected for exploratory analysis. A hierarchical cluster analysis was also performed out to group companies by similar structural, productive and economic features.

Findings

The findings of the survey showed a Sicilian craft beer industry characterised by a substantial dependence on the import of malts hops and yeasts and the limited use of local raw materials among brewers. Furthermore, the characteristics of the processing plants and the sales channels appear to influence the diversification of the products and the turnover levels of the Sicilian craft beer producers.

Originality/value

This is the first study describing the craft brewing industry in Sicily. The findings contribute to enrich the knowledge on the organisational models applied in the craft beer industry. In particular, the findings could contribute to shed light on some critical issues about the provision of raw materials, suggesting possible paths for the successful development of the craft beer industry in the region.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Trey Malone and Jayson L. Lusk

While previous studies have looked at the negative consequences of beer drinking often as a prelude to discussing benefits of laws that curtail consumption, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

While previous studies have looked at the negative consequences of beer drinking often as a prelude to discussing benefits of laws that curtail consumption, the purpose of this paper is to understand the downside of such regulations insofar as reducing entrepreneurial activity in the brewing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a unique data set from the Brewers’ Association that contains information on the number and type of brewery in each county, this study explores the relationship between the number of breweries and regulations targeted at the brewing industry. Zero-inflated negative binomial regressions are used to determine the relationship between the number of microbreweries and brewpubs per county and state beer taxes, self-distribution legislation, and on-premises sales.

Findings

The authors find that allowing breweries to sell beers on-premises as well as allowing for breweries to self-distribute have statistically significant relationships with the number of microbreweries, brewpubs, and breweries. The authors do not find an economically significant relationship between state excise taxes and the number of breweries of any type.

Originality/value

Results suggest that whatever public health benefits are brought about by alcohol laws, they are not a free lunch, as they may hinder entrepreneurial development.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jesper Edman and Christina L. Ahmadjian

We examine the construction of “empty categories” – that is, categories created prior to the existence of producers and consumers – and their implications for industry…

Abstract

We examine the construction of “empty categories” – that is, categories created prior to the existence of producers and consumers – and their implications for industry emergence. Drawing on the case of the ji-biru category among Japanese microbreweries, we exemplify how external actors – including governments, the media, consultants, and other entities – frequently create empty categories that are “legitimate yet not legitimated” (Vergne & Wry, 2014). We show how such empty categories generate lower entry barriers, resulting in higher founding rates and significant innovation. We highlight how empty categories impede evolutionary forces by inhibiting shared understandings of what constitutes a legitimate category member.

Details

Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

T.C. Melewar and Heather Skinner

This paper aims to examine brand-naming decisions, along with other management decisions that affect tourist experiences, such as visitor tours and souvenir appropriation…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine brand-naming decisions, along with other management decisions that affect tourist experiences, such as visitor tours and souvenir appropriation, in the context of a microbrewery located on a Greek island that remains heavily dependent upon tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with the microbrewery’s owner and senior management team to offer rich insights into the issues under investigation.

Findings

Findings stress the importance of the meanings that can be conveyed through brand names, including those that indicate authenticity of the brand’s origin, filling previously identified gaps in the literature on country of origin (COO) with regard to fast-consuming goods and low-involvement products such as beer, and exploring the issue of experiential consumption of beer as part of the tourists’ vacation experience.

Research limitations/implications

Data were gathered from only a single company, and although highlighting important managerial decisions regarding brand naming, further research could be widened to other companies and other industries, and could explore these issues from the tourists own perspective rather than solely from a managerial perspective.

Practical implications

Results may offer insights for local producers, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, whose markets serve both domestic and tourist consumers.

Originality/value

This research furthers knowledge into gaps on a range of issues arising in the literature that have hitherto not been previously linked, specifically: product COO/brand origin, cultural consumption of beverages and sense of place, issues of authenticity, souvenirs and experiential consumption.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Wesley Friske and Miles A. Zachary

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of government regulation on economic value creation through the lens of Resource-Advantage Theory. This study intends…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of government regulation on economic value creation through the lens of Resource-Advantage Theory. This study intends to shed more light on how industry-government relationships affect the entrepreneurial activities that drive economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a test of joint significance (MacKinnon et al., 2002) in a generalized linear model to examine how competition mediates the relationship between government regulation and jobs and wages. The research context is the US brewing industry for the year 2012.

Findings

High excise taxes and certain sales restrictions negatively impact competition, which ultimately affects economic value creation. State regulators may effectively balance the need to bring in tax revenues on the one hand and promote healthy competition on the other by turning to small business tax credits and exemptions. The results of a post hoc analysis indicate excise taxes have the most pronounced effect at the manufacturing level of the supply chain as opposed to the wholesale and retail levels.

Originality/value

The predictive validity of this study suggests that Resource-Advantage Theory is a useful and appropriate framework for understanding how industry–government relations impact the competitive processes that lead to economic value creation. From a practical standpoint, the study also has several implications for public policy, which are detailed in the latter stages of the paper.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Daniel Parker, Michael Taylor, Julio Romero Johnson and Keith Robert Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to analyse data from routine quality control samples of beer over a ten year period to provide comparisons with a previous study in 2006 and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse data from routine quality control samples of beer over a ten year period to provide comparisons with a previous study in 2006 and apply interpretations to the contemporary beer market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from laboratory analysis of 1,469 beers submitted for due diligence quality assurance from commercial microbreweries were analysed. Additional commercial samples were taken for analysis of sour beers and cask conditioned beers as examples of niche product areas.

Findings

Style characteristics were summarized as a reference for industry evaluation and as a basis for comparisons. Differences were noted between the characteristics found and those of a similar study in 2006. Average alcohol by volume increased by 1.2 per cent, bitterness levels increased by 6.1 per cent while colour decreased by 22 per cent. These differences suggest that standard UK beers are undergoing change. A study of sour beers indicated specific features in this recently popular style and confirmed the use of a different microbiology. Analysis of cask ales indicated some variability in quality suggesting the need for greater quality control.

Research limitations/implications

The comparison with the previous study has limitations as the samples were not individually comparable but were from major established microbreweries and so representative of the industry. The work analysed UK beers only but will act as a base line for comparison to other markets. Moreover, the data may be relevant to other forms of market analysis seeking to identify factors associated to consumer preferences.

Practical implications

The data presented have relevance to breweries looking to develop their portfolios and product descriptions, to the drinking public and to regulatory bodies in providing a benchmark for comparisons and for assisting in defining the recently promoted term “craft beer”.

Social implications

The findings are relevant to beverage development and consumer education of alcoholic beverages by allowing discrimination between styles with different characteristics affecting consumer choice and when assessing styles for industrial, legislative and health research. Beers today appear to be more varied than in past decades but show lower colour and higher bitterness characteristics. As these features particularly relate to ingredients they may have implications in their contributions to diet and health.

Originality/value

The work has value in replicating the previous study to illustrate changes and trends. It presents novel data on recently popular sour beers and assesses traditional cask beer with implications for product quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 139