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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Helen McGrath, Thomas O'Toole and Louise Canning

This paper aims to explore coopetition as a fundamental feature of the collaborative dynamics inherent in entrepreneurial ventures. The authors present a conceptual model…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore coopetition as a fundamental feature of the collaborative dynamics inherent in entrepreneurial ventures. The authors present a conceptual model and definition of entrepreneurial coopetition, the latter being explained as entrepreneurial involvement in simultaneous cooperative and competitive interactions with business network actors in a relational environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the micro-brewing industry in a Southern State in the USA, as an empirical base, the authors use an abductive case study approach drawing from multiple data sources including semi-structured interviews, marketing materials, information available on websites and social media, as well as information contained in newspaper articles and policy documents.

Findings

Findings suggest that entrepreneurs habitually interact in a coopetitive manner through norms formed in interaction and that these are often in response to the environment.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to one particular context. Future research could include entrepreneurs from other sectors, state or country contexts which may reveal other coopetition themes.

Practical implications

More benefits in coopetition could be reaped if the entrepreneur were more cognitively aware of, and strategically planned for, the coopetitive processes in which they are (or could be) engaged.

Originality/value

The authors open the black box of entrepreneurial coopetition by putting forward and empirically examining a conceptual definition of entrepreneurial coopetition. This work moves the coopetition discussion beyond the motives behind and consequences of coopetition, analysing interactions from a process perspective. The authors respond to recent calls for a deeper understanding of coopetitive mind-sets and a multilevel approach to coopetition.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Helen McGrath and Thomas O'Toole

The purpose of this paper is to identify the early stage network engagement strategies that new ventures use to gain traction in interaction in the development of network…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the early stage network engagement strategies that new ventures use to gain traction in interaction in the development of network capability.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 24 new ventures in the micro-brewing industry in Ireland, Belgium and the USA as an empirical base, the authors use an inductive case study approach owing to the exploratory nature of the research aim and the lack of prior literature in the area.

Findings

The findings suggest five early stage network engagement process strategies in network capability development: business-to-business network prospecting; co-branding/co-promoting activities; from maker-mindset to adapting; social media platforming; and recognition and activation of network role.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to the micro-brewery sector at one point in time, although in multiple country contexts. Analyzing other sectors and taking a temporal view of strategizing, analyzing the sector at another time point, would show how dynamics in engagement change as the actors acquire new experiences from interaction.

Practical implications

The potential to gain from network resources and the paucity of these resources in new ventures makes early stage engagement strategizing for network capability development an attractive business strategy for new firms. All firms are born within a social network that has economic importance. Identifying the five early stage network engagement strategies can mitigate the challenge for the new venture in moving from the initial social network to collaborating within wider business networks to gain access to resources, technology and customers.

Originality/value

Strategizing in new venture contexts is a relatively new stream of research for the industrial marketing and purchasing group. This paper adds to the growing body of literature that places interaction, relationships and networks at the heart of strategy making and provides important insights for new ventures, which may lead to earlier and greater success for the firms. The authors respond to calls for increased research addressing capability development in a new venture context and for research to take a more interactive perspective on new venture processes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Nicolas Kervyn, Michael Breazeale and Iskra Herak

Cara Pils is the private label beer brand of Colruyt, the biggest supermarket retailer in Belgium. As a true private label brand, Cara Pils has never been advertised. In…

Abstract

Synopsis

Cara Pils is the private label beer brand of Colruyt, the biggest supermarket retailer in Belgium. As a true private label brand, Cara Pils has never been advertised. In 2015, Colruyt undertook an initiative to reposition its numerous private label brands under two larger private label brands. Unexpectedly, customers were incensed by this initiative, came out in droves and took the matter to social media hoping to lament the demise of their beloved brand. This case study investigates the roots of this strong brand attachment and the consequences for its brand management.

Research methodology

This case is built on primary (one in-depth interview and two focus group) as well as secondary data sources (previous research and web information).

Relevant courses and levels

This case is designed to be used in a marketing management or brand strategy course for students that already followed an introduction to marketing course or for students at a master level.

Theoretical bases

This case should provide the basis of discussions on the topics of brand management, private-label brands, repositioning strategy, brand portfolio management, brand architecture, brand equity, brand elements, brand nostalgia, and consumers’ relationships with brands.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jackie Fry, David Tyrrall, Geoff Pugh and John Wyld

This paper surveys the population of independent breweries in the UK to ascertain their Web site usage and accessibility via the Internet. It finds independent breweries…

Abstract

This paper surveys the population of independent breweries in the UK to ascertain their Web site usage and accessibility via the Internet. It finds independent breweries have tended to lag similarly sized business in other sectors in the provision or abandonment of company Web sites. Most of their Web sites have intuitively easy URLs and are readily accessible via brewery directories, but are less accessible via popular search engines. Most are corporate Web sites rather than marketing or selling tools. The paper concludes with a discussion of business and policy implications for small businesses and the Internet.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Jonathan H Deacon, Jacqueline A Harris and Louise Worth

The purpose of this paper is to engage with contemporary gender and entrepreneurship theories to gain insights into the division of labour, capitals and capacities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to engage with contemporary gender and entrepreneurship theories to gain insights into the division of labour, capitals and capacities and gendered identities within husband and wife heterosexual copreneurial businesses. This paper acknowledges copreneurship as a constituent sub group of research within family business and in doing so, the wider small business domain.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple exploratory interview approach was used, with data generated through face-to-face in-depth interviews and ethnographic participant – observer multi-setting observation. This approach provided exceedingly rich and detailed data, and thus insights into the complex relationships found within copreneurial businesses.

Findings

The interviews generated a large amount of qualitative data, which were organised into themes through a process of recursive abstraction. Expelling the myth of the “male lead entrepreneur”, this study found that entrepreneurial identity and roles and responsibilities within a copreneurial business are shared and complementary, and are dependent upon the unique capacities and capitals of each partner. While there is evidence of duties that could be stereotypically described as either “men’s work or women’s work”, there was no apparent role tension between the partners. Thus, no partner’s contribution was deemed more valuable than the other.

Originality/value

By examining the division of labour and unique value/contribution of both men and women within the copreneurial/familial relationship the stereotyped perception of the husband being the lead (male) entrepreneur is challenged in favour of the more complementary capacities, roles, responsibilities and, thus, value of each actor/participant.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Clare Elwood Williams and Guy Lincoln

This paper evaluates the competitive environment of the licensed trade sector of the leisure industry. Porter's model for structural analysis is used to identify the…

Abstract

This paper evaluates the competitive environment of the licensed trade sector of the leisure industry. Porter's model for structural analysis is used to identify the competitive forces affecting the industry and as a framework for making some predictions as to the new directions likely to be facing the industry in the future. The five industry forces — threat of new entrants, power of suppliers, power of buyers, substitute products and competitive rivalry are discussed with relation to the current competitive environment. From this, the major new directions for the licensed trade are presented and their potential impact on industry competition discussed.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Barbara Francioni, Ilaria Curina, Giorgia Masili and Elena Viganò

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the global sourcing (GS) phenomenon from the acquiring firms’ viewpoint by analyzing the Italian craft beer sector. This industry…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the global sourcing (GS) phenomenon from the acquiring firms’ viewpoint by analyzing the Italian craft beer sector. This industry has been chosen since it represents a perfect context for the GS activities’ analysis. Notably, different features characterizing this business force Italian breweries to turn to suppliers, located outside their national borders, to purchase the necessary raw materials.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a multiple case study concerning four Italian agricultural breweries located in the Marche region.

Findings

Results identify the main motivations, drivers, risks, obstacles and costs related to the adoption of the GS activities, by corroborating a positive interconnection with the GS literature findings.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is related to the fact that the study is based on a survey carried out on a specific region and product category. Therefore, future research could analyze other Italian regions and/or different types of products.

Practical implications

The study identifies different gaps characterizing the Italian supply market. Managerially these gaps can be converted into critical opportunities for the future development of the entire Italian brewing sector. Moreover, the results detect several actions the investigated breweries will seek to develop in the near future, which could strongly support the growth of the Italian beer sector.

Originality/value

The study deepens a topic little explored by literature, especially with reference to the supply activities of the Italian agricultural breweries.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Douglas W. Murray and Martin A. O'Neill

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underexplored niche market potential of craft beer, especially as it may relate to independent food and beverage operations, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underexplored niche market potential of craft beer, especially as it may relate to independent food and beverage operations, as a means of gaining competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through the distribution of a survey instrument to craft beer and home brewers, designed to assess the demographic profile, purchasing/restaurant selection, and decision behavior of this group and assess the likelihood of their future behavioral intentions toward continued participation in the craft beer segment.

Findings

The paper reveals that craft beer and micro brew pub success has been driven by the home brew movement and continues to gain market share at the expense of broad line food service and macro beer producers. The demographic profile of this group shows age range, income, and educational levels sufficient to drive continued growth. The high satisfaction and likelihood to recommend scores support this assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to members of the Brewers Association, the American Home Brewers Association, and craft beer enthusiasts known to members of the organization. Additionally, the survey was administered electronically limiting participation to people comfortable with this medium.

Practical implications

F&B operators who demonstrate commitment to craft beer through server education, beverage list commitment, and supporting events can achieve market differentiation and dominance within the niche; leading ultimately to competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on underexplored areas of craft beer and the opportunity for independent F&B operators to identify and penetrate an increasingly important niche market, which to date has been viewed primarily from the perspective of microbrew pubs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Andrew McAuley

This paper reviews several facets of the state of play of current research into the internationalisation process. In particular, the author considers origin, geographical…

Abstract

This paper reviews several facets of the state of play of current research into the internationalisation process. In particular, the author considers origin, geographical coverage, methodology and the theoretical impact of this research domain. The paper concludes by suggesting future directions for colleagues researching in this area and argues that interdisciplinary initiatives by colleagues are likely to be the most productive.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Pantea Foroudi, Charles Dennis, Dimitris Stylidis and T.C. Melewar

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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