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Article

Michelle Wallace

When a workgroup of educators determines to develop an online teaching capability, a number of fundamental change issues become apparent. For the manager, the issues…

Abstract

When a workgroup of educators determines to develop an online teaching capability, a number of fundamental change issues become apparent. For the manager, the issues relate to effecting a change process that is inclusive, sustainable and strategic. For the educators, the issues relate to their pedagogy, work practices and the power relations of the group, challenging their identities as academics. This paper examines the learning and development of one work group engaged in innovation and critiques its processes and outcomes in the light of some theories of organisational and individual change and the construction of work identity. Recommendations are made for sustainable change in similar contexts.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Michelle Wallace

The National Training Reform Agenda (NTRA) (1989‐1996) was the first iteration of a series of reforms designed to make the Australian workforce more skilled, efficient and…

Abstract

The National Training Reform Agenda (NTRA) (1989‐1996) was the first iteration of a series of reforms designed to make the Australian workforce more skilled, efficient and productive. This paper critically examines how women became “(un)known” in these policy texts in relation to work and training. It also examines contemporaneous practices in some workplaces that assigned certain work identities to women and examines how the women resisted or acquiesced to these assigned identities within the discursive field of the workplace. Comparisons of the positioning effects of policy and workplace practices are made and an argument is presented regarding the marginalisation of women within seemingly benign policy discourses and organisational practices.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

Michelle Wallace

Examines the situation for women workers in Australia after a ten‐year focus on training. The National Training Reform Agenda is discussed and the position of women in the…

Abstract

Examines the situation for women workers in Australia after a ten‐year focus on training. The National Training Reform Agenda is discussed and the position of women in the Australian workforce explained. Comparative statistics on workplace training and some qualitative studies that illuminate workplace practice are examined.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article

Melinda Muir, Michelle Wallace and Don McMurray

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the under-researched phenomenon of women, who of their own volition, are choosing to live and work in another country, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the under-researched phenomenon of women, who of their own volition, are choosing to live and work in another country, as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from a career constructivist position, the qualitative framework relied on primary data gathering through semi-structured interviews with 25 western professional SIE women living and working in Beijing.

Findings

The findings suggest that the SIE women's motivations for mobility and their career types and patterns are complex and varied. As an initial and tentative step towards developing a framework of female SIEs’ careers the authors introduce a typology of four career patterns.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory piece of research there is limited generalisability since the findings are presented from the perspective of a particular cohort of women's narratives.

Practical implications

There is a need to recognise the potential value of SIEs to MNCs particularly in light of the well-documented concerns regarding human capital. Companies risk losing this potentially valuable employee if the career opportunities, as well as compensation packages, benefits and support on offer, do not match the plans and expectations of the individuals concerned.

Originality/value

The study provides new insights into the nature and dynamics of the different career modes and configurations of SIE women. This is an important and appropriate research agenda for several reasons. First, there remains a paucity of research on female SIEs. Second, little is known about their career-related behaviours and expectations and the relationship between mobility and career. Thus, it is hoped that a study such as this will add to the emerging body of knowledge about an under researched yet growing number of the some of the most mobile human capital in the world.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article

Michelle Wallace, Cathy Byrne, Andrea Vocino, Terry Sloan, Simon J. Pervan and Deborah Blackman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamics of the Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA) in Australia through the lens of a changing higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamics of the Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA) in Australia through the lens of a changing higher education landscape. The paper reflects on issues raised in a previous analysis of DBA programmes undertaken a decade ago, and highlights persistent challenges and emerging opportunities for professional Doctorate programmes in the Australian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were undertaken with higher degree research directors, deans of graduate schools, and DBA programme directors from all 18 Australian institutions offering the DBA in 2013. Quantitative data on enrolments, accreditation requirements, course structures; and demographics are contextualised within a qualitative view of programme purposes, student and institutional motivations, rationales and concerns. Particular focus is given to perceptions of the difference between traditional research doctorates (PhDs) and professional doctorates, especially the DBA.

Findings

In the decade from 2003 to 2013 DBA enrolments are down but enquiries are up, indicating unmet demand. There is a shift in the players, with some smaller, regional universities dramatically increasing their enrolments, and larger, traditional institutions exiting the space altogether. Significant changes in accreditation criteria have generated a perceptual shift: where DBAs previously suffered from “academic snobbery” regarding their legitimacy, this perception is being challenged by standards which require DBA equivalence with a PhD. This shift in standards has also created some confusion amongst supervisors and candidates.

Originality/value

There is limited research into the DBA award or its candidates, and academic literature is generally silent on DBA supervision. This piece of research, one of very few that specifically examine the DBA, reflects on the past decade, analyses the present context and identifies emerging issues for the delivery of DBA programmes in Australia.

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Article

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Abstract

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Abstract

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Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article

Jeremiah Clabough and Mark Pearcy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of angry political rhetoric employed by George Wallace and Donald Trump. The authors start by discussing the civic thinking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of angry political rhetoric employed by George Wallace and Donald Trump. The authors start by discussing the civic thinking skills stressed within the C3 Framework, specifically the ability to analyze politicians’ arguments. Then, the focus shifts to look at angry political rhetoric within the US history. Next, the authors discuss the parallels of the angry political rhetoric employed by both Wallace and Trump. Finally, two activities are provided that enable students to grasp the convergences with the angry political rhetoric utilized by both Wallace and Trump.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors explore angry rhetoric in American politics. The authors designed two classroom-ready activities by drawing on the best teaching practices advocated for in the C3 Framework. To elaborate, both activities allow students to research and analyze arguments made by George Wallace and Donald Trump. This enables students to engage in the four dimensions of the Inquiry Arc in the C3 Framework.

Findings

The authors provide two activities that can be utilized in the high school social studies classroom to enable students to dissect American politicians’ messages. These two activities can be adapted and utilized to enable students to examine a political candidate’s messages, especially those that draw on angry rhetoric. By completing the steps of these two activities, students are better prepared to be critical consumers of political media messages.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors explore the role of angry political rhetoric in American politics. The authors examine the parallels of political style between George Wallace and Donald Trump. Two activities are provided to help students break down the angry political rhetoric employed by these two controversial figures.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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