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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Michelle Gander

Hybrid career has been discussed in the literature for some time but is still an emergent concept. The study investigated the careers of university professional staff working in…

1603

Abstract

Purpose

Hybrid career has been discussed in the literature for some time but is still an emergent concept. The study investigated the careers of university professional staff working in universities in Australia and the UK to better understand the careers of this underresearched cohort of staff. The findings were used to extend the theory of the hybrid career.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 139 career stories were collected via an open-ended question in an online survey. Inductive thematic analysis was used to create themes and theorise career pathways relevant to the participants' careers.

Findings

It was found that participants had a hybrid career orientation (HCO) based on their essential values and their reciprocal relationship with their employer. Four career pathways emerged from the data: intra-organisational advancement, inter-organisational advancement, work–life balance and dead end.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for future research to investigate the HCO, both to add depth to the understanding of careers for university professional staff in universities and to examine the hybrid concept in other settings.

Practical implications

It is suggested that by grouping staff into career pathways, human resource practitioners could provide more targeted interventions to ensure that staff are motivated and productive for the benefit of the organisation.

Originality/value

The research has extended the concept of the hybrid career and discovered four career pathways relevant to university professional staff.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Michelle Gander and Margot McInnes

The professional development needs of university professional staff are an under-researched area. More data were needed to understand their needs to ensure that employers invest…

Abstract

Purpose

The professional development needs of university professional staff are an under-researched area. More data were needed to understand their needs to ensure that employers invest their resources appropriately. A conceptual framework is developed for the workplace learning of career development activities using concepts of professional learning communities, adult learning and non-formal learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of a professional development network in meeting the needs of university professional staff after a re-structure.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the development of a staff career network at an Australian university after a restructure is presented. An online survey was sent to 75 staff who had attended at least one professional development event. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Findings

This study has shown that a university professional staff career network has been a positive influence for its participants after an organisational restructure. The value of this network was to increase confidence and provide opportunities for self-improvement, career planning and networking.

Originality/value

A conceptual model integrating the concepts of professional learning communities, adult learning and non-formal learning has resulted in a model of social non-formalised workplace learning that may be of use in other contexts to improve staff motivation, outside of more formal learning opportunities.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Michelle Gander, Antonia Girardi and Megan Paull

Human capital is a key component of the success of organisations, and career development of staff is a vital component to both increasing and retaining human capital. Universities…

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Abstract

Purpose

Human capital is a key component of the success of organisations, and career development of staff is a vital component to both increasing and retaining human capital. Universities are no different, their people are key to their mission. There has been limited rigorous study of the careers of professional staff in the academy. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review methodology resulted in a review of 23 articles dedicated to research on careers of professional staff in higher education (HE). Thematic analysis identified a series of enablers and barriers that influence career development and progression.

Findings

Career enablers and barriers have been found to exist at both the institutional and individual levels. Within the HE context, professional staff have a hybrid career mindset, desiring traditional and more contemporary career factors, leading to a reciprocal relationship between the organisation and the individual.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for future research to investigate the hybrid career mindset, and the reciprocal relationship, both to add depth to understanding of careers for professional staff in universities, and to examine this in other settings.

Practical implications

Universities may need to consider ways to integrate institutional support for high performance work systems (HPWS) with opportunities for professional staff, while individuals may need to consider adopting career self-management behaviours (CSMB) to fit their hybrid mindset.

Originality/value

This review has highlighted organisations and individuals will benefit if the relationship between HPWS and CSMB is better understood for the hybrid career mindset.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 January 2024

Jennifer A. Harrison

214

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Abstract

Details

Positive Psychology for Healthcare Professionals: A Toolkit for Improving Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-957-4

Abstract

Details

Positive Psychology for Healthcare Professionals: A Toolkit for Improving Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-957-4

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Sujin Kim, Michelle Hood, Peter Creed and Debra Bath

Using latent profile analysis, the authors explored the career profiles of young adult tertiary students (N = 468, 73.9% women; mean age 20 years) to determine the relative…

1055

Abstract

Purpose

Using latent profile analysis, the authors explored the career profiles of young adult tertiary students (N = 468, 73.9% women; mean age 20 years) to determine the relative importance of traditional career orientation (TCO) and protean career orientation (PCO) beliefs for them.

Design/methodology/approach

Young adults studying at university can aspire to traditional career experiences as they believe organizations will support their professional and career development. However, since the development of newer career models, the TCO model has received little research attention compared to the PCO.

Findings

The authors found that the dominant profile exhibited average levels of TCO, PCO and career competencies, and that this mixed profile was associated with more mature career identity development and greater organizational commitment. A second profile, with low TCO, average PCO and career competencies, showed a similar level of career maturity to the mixed profile, but exhibited less organizational commitment. A third profile, with average TCO, low PCO and career competencies, especially vocational identity awareness, was related to less career development and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that a mixed traditional-protean orientation is common in young adult tertiary students and that the development of a vocational identity is important for positive career outcomes, regardless of orientation.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Carolyn Gregoric and Annabelle Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach, using autoethnography, was employed to explore the relationship from a complex adaptive systems (CAS) perspective.

Findings

Informal peer-mentoring relationships may improve the work effectiveness and quality of the doctoral student and early career researcher experience. CAS can be an effective overarching theory for expanding understandings about mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to two early career researchers.

Practical implications

Informal peer mentoring may help to overcome challenges encountered by doctoral students, early career researchers and university staff members. CAS accounts of mentoring have the potential to open new possibilities for future mentoring research.

Originality/value

This paper provides unique insights into the experiences of doctoral students postgraduation and a long-term informal peer-mentoring relationship. Explorations of mentoring relationships from a CAS perspective are innovative.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

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