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1 – 10 of 15
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Bronwen K. Maxson, Michelle E. Neely, Lindsay M. Roberts, Sean M. Stone, M. Sara Lowe, Katharine V. Macy and Willie Miller

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and writing-intensive courses. It explores connections to critical pedagogy, sociocultural theory, open educational practices and high-impact practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for implementing the three scenarios discussed in the paper differs widely. All approaches include some form of student feedback through focus groups, exit surveys or end-of-class assessments.

Findings

In both library and writing program settings, students have experience with and a favorable opinion of peer-assisted learning strategies.

Practical implications

These case studies provide concrete examples of how to develop different types of peer teaching interventions. The cases also detail benefits as well as challenges to implementation.

Social implications

Providing opportunities for peers to lead through teaching others has the potential to boost an individual’s sense of confidence, leadership and improve their own learning, as well as give students’ experiences to build upon and apply to their everyday lives and future careers.

Originality/value

While peer teaching is widely implemented in many disciplines, such as science, technology, engineering and medicine, its adoption in academic libraries has sometimes been viewed as controversial. This case study adds to the body of literature demonstrating that peer teaching is possible and desirable.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Kirsten Butcher, Madlyn Runburg and Michelle Hudson

This paper aims to examine the impact of using digitized objects for inquiry with middle-school classrooms. Research analyzed critical thinking processes and student…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of using digitized objects for inquiry with middle-school classrooms. Research analyzed critical thinking processes and student engagement during collaborative investigations with 3D models of authentic objects.

Design/methodology/approach

Digitized objects were 3D scans of fossils from the paleontology collection at the Natural History Museum of Utah implemented as 3D prints and 3D virtual models. Verbal protocol analysis examined critical thinking processes during collaborative student learning. Engagement was assessed via student feedback and a classroom observation protocol.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that digitized objects facilitated key critical thinking processes, particularly observation, problem finding, elaboration and evaluation. Student feedback was very positive and focused on strong interest in 3D technologies and the ability to engage in authentic exploration. Observations showed very high levels of on-task engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is necessary to determine if findings generalize across varied learner populations, including broader age ranges and socioeconomic samples, to activities implemented as fully online experiences and to digitized objects from varied domains.

Originality/value

Findings demonstrate digitized objects are effective methods to engage students in critical thinking and to promote engagement with authentic objects during classroom learning. Results demonstrate strong potential of new technologies to leverage the educational impact of digitized objects from local collections, setting the stage for expanded educational outreach by museums and libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Michelle Kathleen Dunaway and Michael Teague Orblych

This paper aims to describe the use of a pre‐assessment exercise and in‐session assessment questions to determine graduate students' existing information literacy skills…

4683

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the use of a pre‐assessment exercise and in‐session assessment questions to determine graduate students' existing information literacy skills and to adjust the content of the instruction session accordingly. The paper seeks to propose that the use of assessments to inform instruction increases the practicality of research instruction. The use of formative assessment creates effective information literacy instruction by acknowledging variation in information literacy skills among students.

Design/methodology/approach

A librarian partnered with a faculty member to create instruction sessions for graduate level business courses. An open‐ended pre‐assessment exercise was administered prior to the session, and students' responses were used to determine the content of the instruction session. Assessment questions administered during the session provided the librarian with a measure of the effect of the pre‐assessment exercise on students' information literacy skills, and provided students with feedback regarding their individual information literacy and engaged students in the learning process.

Findings

The pre‐assessment exercise and the session assessment questions together created an instruction session that included content that was appropriate for the students in each session. Therefore, these information literacy instruction sessions were more practical and beneficial to the students than sessions based on pre‐determined content.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a conceptual approach to the design of research instruction sessions rather than extensive empirical analysis of data. Therefore, the essay addresses the need for quantitative measures of the impact of formative assessment on students' information literacy skills.

Originality/value

The process of formative assessment has not been applied to one‐shot information literacy instruction sessions.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Abel Duarte Alonso, Oanh Thi Kim Vu, Seng Kiat Kok and Michelle O'Shea

The purpose of this study is to examine adaptation to a dynamic business environment from the perspective of family and non-family firms. Furthermore, the study provides a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine adaptation to a dynamic business environment from the perspective of family and non-family firms. Furthermore, the study provides a comparative component and proposes a theoretical framework to understand firm adaptation, incorporating the dynamic capabilities approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews were undertaken predominantly with firm owners and managers of family and non-family-owned firms operating in Western Australia.

Findings

Regardless of firms’ family or non-family background, valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable and non-substitutable attributes were strongly associated with both groups. Moreover, expertise, tacit and new knowledge, innovation or established brand image emerged as key adaptive responses to challenges posed by new trends, consumer expectations, increased demand or competition. These attributes allowed firms to sense and seize opportunities, and experience transformational processes to remain competitive. Implications of the findings and future research directions will be discussed.

Originality/value

First, and empirically, the study’s objectives contribute to addressing extant research gaps, including scant research on methodologies and innovative approaches used by family firms to adapt to contemporary challenges. Thus, the study complements entrepreneurship scholarly discourses on firms’ adaptation. Second, the chosen inductive approach results in the development of a framework, which also exhibits various relationships with the adopted dynamic capabilities approach. Both the findings and the developed framework enhance the understanding of adaptive behaviour among both family and non-family firms. Finally, the study contributes to the literature examining firms operating in geographically dispersed and isolated regions.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Michelle Gohr and Vitalina A. Nova

By historicizing the broader system of education contextualized under the 45th presidential administration, this paper aims to provide a nuanced discussion regarding the…

Abstract

Purpose

By historicizing the broader system of education contextualized under the 45th presidential administration, this paper aims to provide a nuanced discussion regarding the condition of information literacy and librarianship as capitalist institutions in service to the state. In response, tools to oppose systemic racism and minimize harm in the classroom as well as recommendations for change and resistance are addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on historical analysis of libraries as institutions within larger educational systems and draws heavily on critical theories as a method of critique.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that the 45th presidential administration is a logical progression of neoliberalism and institutionalized discrimination, which has had adverse effects on the health and safety of (primarily marginalized) students, library workers and library practice, but that critical reflection and information seeking on part of librarians may provide solutions.

Practical implications

This paper can be used as a guide for librarians seeking to contextualize the educational environment and apply a critical praxis to information literacy programs.

Social implications

The reflection presented in this paper can aid in expanding awareness in LIS surrounding issues of equity and justice, and impart urgency and need for institutional change.

Originality/value

Given the lack of diversity in library and information science, this paper provides critical interventions for information literacy practice. The authors’ unique practical and theoretical backgrounds allow for nuanced discussion and pedagogical creation which directly impacts and addresses key issues of justice and equity in the classroom.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Andrew Salcido and Brian H. Kleiner

A growing priority for HR managers is to structure their organisation's employment‐related policies and procedures in such a manner as to minimise the organisation's…

Abstract

A growing priority for HR managers is to structure their organisation's employment‐related policies and procedures in such a manner as to minimise the organisation's potential for a lawsuit. It is estimated that the legal cost to take one significant case to trial can be $75,000 to $250,000.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Beverley R Lord, Yvonne P Shanahan and Michelle J Gage

The Balanced Scorecard (BSC), first introduced by Kaplan and Norton in 1992, is described as a comprehensive performance measurement system as well as a strategic…

2150

Abstract

The Balanced Scorecard (BSC), first introduced by Kaplan and Norton in 1992, is described as a comprehensive performance measurement system as well as a strategic management tool. Over the past decade, the BSC has attracted increasing attention in mainstream management accounting research. A review of the literature identifies five main areas of criticism relating to the BSC. Using particularly Nørreklit’s (2000, 2003) criticisms of the BSC’s assumptions, this research gained views (using both a pilot and follow up survey of New Zealand companies) on the number and titles of perspectives in the BSC; the existence and understanding of cause‐and‐effect relationships; whether or not the BSC was perceived as a strategic control model; the number of performance measures and perceptions of the ability to judge performance based on those measures; and the credibility and effectiveness of the BSC as a management solution. The findings show that the BSC is not used extensively by the firms studied but those that do use it take full advantage of the BSC’s flexibility, using broader perspective names, as needed, to incorporate the desired aspects of organisational performance. There appears to be no concern over whether the cause‐and‐effect relationships meet a set of academic criteria relating to empirical verification and logical independence. However, Nørreklit’s (2000) criticism that the BSC fails to increase strategy awareness finds some support. The findings also contradict the suggestion that the BSC necessitates an excessive number of performance measures which could be detrimental to managerial performance evaluation. Finally, the criticism that the BSC is merely a trend, popularised by management consulting firms, is also not supported.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Beth G. Chung, Michelle A. Dean and Karen Holcombe Ehrhart

This study examines whether inclusion values predict organizational outcomes through mediating effects of inclusive HR practices and investigates whether intellectual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines whether inclusion values predict organizational outcomes through mediating effects of inclusive HR practices and investigates whether intellectual (human and social) capital serves as a contingency variable in moderating the relationship between practices and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Organizational-level data were collected from 79 senior-level executives. Hypotheses were examined via regression analyses and the product-of-coefficients approach was used to test for indirect and conditional indirect effects.

Findings

This study found a positive relationship between inclusion values and inclusive HR practices and between inclusive HR practices and organization-level outcomes. Inclusive HR practices mediated the relationship between values and outcomes and intellectual capital moderated the relationship between practices and outcomes, such that inclusive HR practices played a greater role in augmenting outcomes for organizations with lower intellectual capital.

Practical implications

Alignment of inclusion values and inclusive HR practices is important for organizational effectiveness, and inclusive HR practices are likely to play a particularly important role when an organization is relatively weak in intellectual capital.

Originality/value

This paper broadens the inclusion literature by using a macro-level lens to understand how organizational inclusion values and practices may relate to organizational outcomes. It also shows the importance of intellectual capital as a contextual variable in the inclusion practice to outcome relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Michelle Nathalie Eliasson

The purpose of this study is to explore how Swedish police officers describe occupational knowledge. By learning more about how officers describe occupational knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how Swedish police officers describe occupational knowledge. By learning more about how officers describe occupational knowledge, the study gives more insight about the types of information that they may be more likely to adopt in their occupational tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the author conducted 27 semi-structured interviews with Swedish police officers. I asked officers several open-ended questions about their everyday work life and professional experience.

Findings

Swedish officers divide knowledge into two categories, which are theoretical knowledge and practical knowledge. Theoretical knowledge is learned in the academy and is described as “black and white,” meaning that it is considered static and not applicable to what happens out in patrol. Practical knowledge is learned in the field from colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

Police officers around the world have a wide range of requirements and training to become police officers. However, empirical studies have found that officers tend to use different types of information when performing policing tasks. Depending on how information is perceived and is taught, officers may respond differently to different types of knowledge, due to their evaluation of the validity of the knowledge.

Originality/value

The findings in this study support previous empirical studies on the area of policing and knowledge in two ways; first, this study argues that there is a categorization of knowledge among police officers. Second, this study suggests that officers view one occupational knowledge type as more theoretical and one as more practical.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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