Search results

1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Michelle A. Morganosky and Brenda J. Cude

In this paper we analyze consumer demand for and acceptance of online food retailing using longitudinal data collected in three studies (1998, 1999, and 2001). Information…

6238

Abstract

In this paper we analyze consumer demand for and acceptance of online food retailing using longitudinal data collected in three studies (1998, 1999, and 2001). Information reported is from online food shoppers in ten US markets. Comparisons of results from each of the three studies is presented and change patterns identified. We conclude by recommending that researchers shift their attention toward addressing some of the more troublesome supply side issues of the online food retailing equation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Sarah P. Rousey and Michelle A. Morganosky

Asks how consumers are responding to the diverse array of retail choices as new formats continue to emerge in US retailing and increasingly in overseas markets. Through the…

2779

Abstract

Asks how consumers are responding to the diverse array of retail choices as new formats continue to emerge in US retailing and increasingly in overseas markets. Through the collection of interview data, analyses penetration levels and patronage movement as well as market change push and pull factors. Studies ten retail formats including department stores, speciality stores, mass merchandisers, discount stores, mail order catalogues, off‐price stores, manufacturers’ outlets, warehouse clubs, used stores and television home shopping channels. Consumers evidenced high levels of cross‐shopping between formats. Discusses the means by which various formats deliver value to the consumer in light of current market strategies.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Janet L. Khachaturian and Michelle A. Morganosky

Consumers′ perceptions of quality for apparel products from fivecountries of origin are studied from the perspective of congruitytheory. Utilising random digit dialling, telephone…

1514

Abstract

Consumers′ perceptions of quality for apparel products from five countries of origin are studied from the perspective of congruity theory. Utilising random digit dialling, telephone interviews were obtained from households throughout the United States. Findings suggest that different countries of origin have various effects on consumers′ quality perceptions, with the magnitude of such an effect tending to reflect the country of origin′s level of industrial development. The least industrialised country, Costa Rica, had the most negative impact on perceived quality. Conversely, with the USA and Italy being more industrialised countries, association with apparel made in the USA usually had a positive influence on the quality image, while Italy′s influence was more neutral. Therefore, this study provides retailers with an additional perspective when sourcing their apparel products through the examination of the relationship between consumer perception of apparel quality and a country of origin′s level of industrial development.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Michelle A. Morganosky and Brenda J. Cude

Reports a preliminary assessment of consumer response to and demand for online food retail channels. Data were collected from 243 US consumers who currently buy their groceries…

33917

Abstract

Reports a preliminary assessment of consumer response to and demand for online food retail channels. Data were collected from 243 US consumers who currently buy their groceries online. The majority of online users were younger than 55 years of age, female, and reported annual incomes of $70,000 or more. Over 70 percent reported convenience and saving time as their primary reasons for buying groceries online but 15 percent cited physical or constraint issues that made it difficult for them to shop at grocery stores. Of the respondents, 19 percent bought all of their groceries online. Also reports demographic and online shopping variables that are significantly related to the primary reason for shopping online, willingness to buy all grocery items online, perception of time spent shopping online vs in the store, and experience with online grocery shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Michelle A. Morganosky

Compares and contrasts use of the Internet for the 100 largest US retail companies. Discusses availability of Internet addresses and online status in terms of retail types (food…

2639

Abstract

Compares and contrasts use of the Internet for the 100 largest US retail companies. Discusses availability of Internet addresses and online status in terms of retail types (food, apparel, discount retailers) and differences between companies of various sizes. While a high percentage of retailers were identified as having Internet addresses (91 per cent), only 64 per cent were identified as currently online. Online presence was most notable for retailers selling electronics, drug stores and department stores. Somewhat suprisingly, apparel retailers did not exhibit a strong online presence. Online status did appear to be associated with company size, with lower sales volume companies somewhat less likely to have an online presence. Categorized and discusses accordingly analysis of the information contained in each retailer’s Internet site.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Michelle A. Morganosky

Examines the cross‐shopping patterns of 300 US consumers for five different grocery formats including conventional supermarkets, supercentres, warehouse clubs, convenience stores…

1743

Abstract

Examines the cross‐shopping patterns of 300 US consumers for five different grocery formats including conventional supermarkets, supercentres, warehouse clubs, convenience stores and limited line discount stores. The extent to which each channel extracts customers from every other channel is assessed and analysed in light of continuing structural change in grocery retailing. As a fairly new retail format in the US market, supercentres have moved quickly in attracting customers from each of the other formats. Discusses major players in the supercentre phenomenon in light of these changing market conditions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Michelle A. Morganosky

A major trend in US retailing is the increasingly diverse array of retail formats available to consumers. Owing to the emergence of new retail formats, competition between…

7269

Abstract

A major trend in US retailing is the increasingly diverse array of retail formats available to consumers. Owing to the emergence of new retail formats, competition between retailers of all types is heightening. Uses data from two consumer studies, to illustrate the pervasiveness and complexity of consumer cross‐shopping patterns across various retail channels. Addresses the implications of this retail trend in terms of channel competition and competitiveness in the US market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

Michael R. Ward and Michelle Morganosky

We examine consumer use of the Internet as a product information gathering tool (distinct from the use of it for transaction completion). We use data from surveys to estimate how…

Abstract

We examine consumer use of the Internet as a product information gathering tool (distinct from the use of it for transaction completion). We use data from surveys to estimate how consumer use of different marketing information channels (Internet, print, catalog, broadcast) affects the choice of channel for purchasing the good (Internet, retail, direct mail). Across many product categories, we find that Internet product information gathering increases the likeliness of purchase in other channels. Similar effects from other informational channels are not observed. Our findings have implications for measuring the retail impact of the Internet, the assumption of better informed consumers, the competitiveness of off-line, as well as online markets, and the management of “channel conflict.”

Details

The Economics of the Internet and E-commerce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-971-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

John Fernie

226

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Francisco Guzman and Cleopatra Veloutsou

228

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

1 – 10 of 10