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Article

Sandy Whitelaw, Chris Topping, Michele McCoy and Lindsay Turpie

The purpose of this paper is to report and critically reflect on the methodological processes involved in a formal attempt to promote health and social integration in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report and critically reflect on the methodological processes involved in a formal attempt to promote health and social integration in the rarely reported public health domain of physical activity promotion.

Design/methodology/approach

A quality improvement (QI) methodology was deployed, comprising three elements: a diagnostic tool that assessed strategic and practice positions; a half-day workshop that brought senior leaders together for to reflect this evidence; and a structured process that sought to generate proposals for future integrated action. A mixed-method evaluative approach was used, capturing insights of the integration processes via quantitative and qualitative data collection pre-event, in-event, immediate post-event and at six-month follow-up.

Findings

Insights suggested that despite some critical concerns, this QI process can be considered as robust, offering pointers to elements required to successfully promote integration in this domain, including the significance of leadership, the preparatory contribution of a diagnostic tool and position paper, the opportunities for active exchange and planning within a workshop situation and the initiation of a process of integrated work via tangible “pledges”.

Originality/value

The paper offers originality in two respects. Generally, it describes and reflects on the relationship between theoretical and empirical dimensions of a model of integration promotion. Specifically, in offering an account of integrative public health work across health service, local authority and third sector partners, it addressed an area that has received relatively limited prior attention.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article

Corren G. McCoy, Michael L. Nelson and Michele C. Weigle

The purpose of this study is to present an alternative to university ranking lists published in U.S. News & World Report, Times Higher Education, Academic Ranking of World

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present an alternative to university ranking lists published in U.S. News & World Report, Times Higher Education, Academic Ranking of World Universities and Money Magazine. A strategy is proposed to mine a collection of university data obtained from Twitter and publicly available online academic sources to compute social media metrics that approximate typical academic rankings of US universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The Twitter application programming interface (API) is used to rank 264 universities using two easily collected measurements. The University Twitter Engagement (UTE) score is the total number of primary and secondary followers affiliated with the university. The authors mine other public data sources related to endowment funds, athletic expenditures and student enrollment to compute a ranking based on the endowment, expenditures and enrollment (EEE) score.

Findings

In rank-to-rank comparisons, the authors observed a significant, positive rank correlation (τ = 0.6018) between UTE and an aggregate reputation ranking, which indicates UTE could be a viable proxy for ranking atypical institutions normally excluded from traditional lists.

Originality/value

The UTE and EEE metrics offer distinct advantages because they can be calculated on-demand rather than relying on an annual publication and they promote diversity in the ranking lists, as any university with a Twitter account can be ranked by UTE and any university with online information about enrollment, expenditures and endowment can be given an EEE rank. The authors also propose a unique approach for discovering official university accounts by mining and correlating the profile information of Twitter friends.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

Content available
Article

Matthew Valle, Martha C. Andrews and K. Michele Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the mediating effect of organizational identification. The authors also explored the moderating role of satisfaction with supervisor on the relationship between the antecedents and organizational identification as well as its moderating effect on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used structural equation modeling techniques, using MPLUS 7.4, to analyze data collected from 247 full-time employees who were recruited by undergraduate students attending a private university in the Southeast region of the USA.

Findings

Results demonstrated that the indirect effects for procedural justice and training opportunities as predictors were significant, while none of the paths for innovation as a predictor were significant. Satisfaction with supervisor moderated the relationships between procedural justice and organizational identification and innovation and organizational identification.

Originality/value

This research expands the nomological network concerning antecedents and consequences of organizational identification. It also explores the role of satisfaction with one’s supervisor, as this can affect identification with the organization. This research provides support for the notion that stronger employee–organization relationships lead to positive individual and organizational outcomes.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article

David Cosgrave and Michele O'Dwyer

This study explores the millennial perceptions of cause-related marketing (CRM) in international markets through the lens of an ethical continuum. Literature gaps exist in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the millennial perceptions of cause-related marketing (CRM) in international markets through the lens of an ethical continuum. Literature gaps exist in our understanding of cause-related marketing, ethics and millennials in an international context, with few studies offering insights into successful CRM campaigns in developed vs developing countries. Previous studies have yielded differing responses based on culture, sociodemographic and consumer perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research method was adopted to build the theory necessary to address this research gap. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 155 undergraduate and postgraduate students representing 17 nationalities. Interviews were conducted in two regions (Ireland and United Arab Emirates) representing developed and developing markets.

Findings

Discrepancies exist between millennial consumers when it comes to ethical self-reporting, perceptions of CRM initiatives, choice criteria of CRM offers and purchase intentions. Findings also suggest that there is a relationship between the religious and ethical beliefs of millennials in certain regions. Gender showed no significant differences in perceptions of CRM.

Originality/value

This study examines millennial perceptions of CRM from multiple nationalities in developed vs developing markets. It introduces the ethical continuum in international CRM as a lens to examine perceptions of millennial consumers. The study identifies that millennials should not be treated as a homogenous group, suggesting different choice criteria of millennial consumers based on their ethical standards. It demonstrates emerging support for the role of religion in successful adoption of CRM.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-540-1

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Article

Lucette B. Comer and Tanya Drollinger

For the past several decades women have been moving into the United States workforce in greater numbers and they have been gaining access to the types of jobs that were…

Abstract

For the past several decades women have been moving into the United States workforce in greater numbers and they have been gaining access to the types of jobs that were, traditionally, performed exclusively by men. Despite this progress, they are still having difficulty penetrating the so‐called “glass ceiling” into upper management positions (Alimo‐Metcalfe 1993; Tavakolian 1993). Many reasons have been advanced, but the most compelling of these concerns the “glass walls” that support the “glass ceiling”. The “glass walls” refer to those invisible barriers that limit the ability of women and minorities to gain access to the type of job that would place them in a position to break through the “glass ceiling” (Townsend 1996). If women are to gain parity with men in the workforce, they need to succeed in the positions that lie inside the “glass walls” that will enable them to rise through the “glass ceiling” to upper management.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part

Jean Beaman

Based on ethnographic research in the Paris metropolitan region, I discuss how my identity as a Black American ethnographer was implicated in this urban ethnography…

Abstract

Based on ethnographic research in the Paris metropolitan region, I discuss how my identity as a Black American ethnographer was implicated in this urban ethnography. Specifically, I discuss the intersections of researcher identity with that of the “researched” and how I was simultaneously framed as an insider and outsider due to different facets of my own identity. I further argue that these insights were data in and of itself as they revealed how race and racism operate in a society that has long disavowed their existence.

Details

Urban Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-033-2

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Article

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article

Karyn R. Lacy

Compares race relations in two suburban communities in order to show that middle‐class blacks meet with some success when they temporarily exchange their racial identity…

Abstract

Compares race relations in two suburban communities in order to show that middle‐class blacks meet with some success when they temporarily exchange their racial identity for a class‐based identity. Collects data through ethnography and individual interview to examine the conditions under which middle‐class blacks construct and assert a sub‐urban identity. States that success varies with the racial composition of the suburban community and the white neighbours’ level of the satisfaction with the community.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Tracy L. Scott

Uses qualitative data to explore how contemporary religious beliefs mark conceptions of work, particularly with regards to the beliefs of conservative protestant women…

Abstract

Uses qualitative data to explore how contemporary religious beliefs mark conceptions of work, particularly with regards to the beliefs of conservative protestant women. Compares liberal protestant women and men as well as conservative men against this group. States that conservative women consider motherhood as their most important work yet they are also most likely to feel “called” to their paid work. Cites that this has important implications for the sociological literature on gender and work. Builds on the original work of Max Weber.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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