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Article

Afokoghene Z. Okpozo, Tao Gong, Michele Campbell Ennis and Babafemi Adenuga

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of ethical leadership on the burnout process among resident physicians, and the mediating roles of general…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of ethical leadership on the burnout process among resident physicians, and the mediating roles of general self-efficacy and perceived supervisor support (PSS) in the relationship between ethical leadership behavior and various aspects of burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 203 residents of three teaching hospitals in the South Atlantic Division of the USA completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and Survey of Perceived Supervisor Support and rated the ethical leadership of their supervising attending physicians on the Ethical Leadership Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis and path analysis were conducted to test the measurement and hypothesized structural models.

Findings

The results showed that ethical leadership had a negative indirect effect on emotional exhaustion through PSS and a positive indirect effect on personal accomplishment through general self-efficacy. However, PSS and general self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between ethical leadership and depersonalization.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of knowledge on the impact of ethical leadership on three aspects of burnout syndrome, i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Moreover, this is the first study to consider PSS and general self-efficacy as intervening variables to the ethical leadership-burnout relationship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Merideth Thompson, Dawn S. Carlson and K. Michele Kacmar

The authors examine a boundary management tactic for managing the work–family interface: putting family first (PFF). PFF is a boundary management tactic defined as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine a boundary management tactic for managing the work–family interface: putting family first (PFF). PFF is a boundary management tactic defined as the voluntary behavior of intentionally putting family obligations ahead of work obligations in a way that violates organizational norms

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, The authors develop a theoretically derived measure of PFF and distinguish it theoretically and empirically from similar existing constructs, examining convergent and discriminate validity to demonstrate its uniqueness. In Study 2, the authors demonstrate PFF's predictive validity beyond the job incumbent using a three-way matched sample of 226 individuals, including the job incumbent's coworker and spouse.

Findings

The authors established and validated a measure of PFF, developing and replicating the nomological network. PFF crossed over to positively relate to coworker role overload, job frustration and work–family conflict and to spousal stress transmission and relationship tension. Similarly, PFF related negatively to spousal family satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The authors extend the work–family and boundary management literatures by proposing a new form of boundary management, PFF, which is a tactic for managing the work–family interface, and explore how its use influences not only the job incumbent but also the coworker and the spouse.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Ismail Sila and Maling Ebrahimpour

There has been a plethora of published research related to total quality management (TQM) in the last few decades. However, very few studies focused on cataloging critical…

Abstract

There has been a plethora of published research related to total quality management (TQM) in the last few decades. However, very few studies focused on cataloging critical factors of TQM. One of the objectives of this literature review was to investigate the state of TQM by examining and listing various TQM factors identified based on survey studies conducted in different countries and published in a variety of journals over the past decade. An examination of 76 survey studies that used an integrated approach to TQM showed that the TQM factors could be grouped under 25 categories. An analysis of the 347 survey based research articles published between 1989 and 2000 using these 25 factors as a framework revealed the most frequently covered TQM factors in the literature. Another goal of the paper was to analyse the objectives of these articles by year and type of journal they were published in to determine the trends in TQM survey based studies and recommend future direction for research. The analysis showed that the objectives of the 347 studies could be grouped under six categories.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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