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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Chun Zhang and Michel Laroche

This study aims to examine the emotional components of brand hate and the variation of emotions across different levels of brand hate.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the emotional components of brand hate and the variation of emotions across different levels of brand hate.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 uses in-depth interviews and data triangulation. Studies 2-5 make use of quantitative methods to test and validate the multidimensional structure of brand hate and the variation of its composing emotions.

Findings

Study 1 suggests that brand hate is a multidimensional construct comprised of anger-, sadness- and fear-related emotions; possible antecedents and consequences are discussed. The quantitative results from Studies 2-5 confirm the findings in Study 1. A three-factor scale consisting of nine items is developed. The proposed model is tested among different samples and is compared with the currently available brand hate models. In addition, the findings show that emotions weigh differently for different brand hate levels.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the brand hate literature and provides a structure to understand brand hate more thoroughly.

Practical implications

Companies can benefit from the research through a better knowledge of brand hate. Managers can use the multidimensional measurement to detect brand hate and better cope with it.

Originality/value

This study is among the first few attempts to examine the multidimensionality of brand hate and to investigate the variation of emotions in different brand hate levels. This study contributes to a more precise description of the brand hate construct and improves understanding of consumer-brand relationships.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Kashef A. Majid, David W. Kolar and Michel Laroche

Crises threaten the operations of small businesses and endanger their survival; however, when the crisis is not attributable to the firm, consumers may rally around the…

Abstract

Purpose

Crises threaten the operations of small businesses and endanger their survival; however, when the crisis is not attributable to the firm, consumers may rally around the business. This study aims to examine how attitudes toward helping others can create support for small businesses, which in turn can direct consumers to help businesses with increased financial support. It is hoped that this paper will inform how consumers will help firms pivot during crises.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was proposed which linked support for helping others to increased willingness to tip/amount tipped. The model was tested using structural equation modeling from two surveys given to customers of two small businesses, a coffee shop and an independent movie theater, respectively.

Findings

During a crisis, support for helping others has a positive impact on feelings of support for small businesses. Consumers direct their support to small businesses that they are interested in seeing survive and continue operations. They either tip more or tip when they otherwise would not have tipped.

Practical implications

Firms that pivot their operations because of a crisis imposed on them can still generate revenues. Consumers who have a self-interest in the continuing operations of the firm want to support it, and by pivoting their business model, the firm gives consumers the opportunity to give the firm and its employees more than they would have in the form of tips.

Originality/value

Prior work in crisis management has focused primarily on how firms recover and respond to a crisis of their doing. Overwhelmingly, consumers have been shown to punish firms during times of crisis. However, for a crisis that is imposed on the firm, consumers may rally behind the firm and respond by supporting it more than they are required to.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Michel Laroche, Rong Li, Marie-Odile Richard and Muxin Shao

This study aims to investigate how consumers respond to global brands adapting to local elements. Specifically, this study identified three factors (i.e., cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how consumers respond to global brands adapting to local elements. Specifically, this study identified three factors (i.e., cultural compatibility, cultural elements authenticity and cultural pride) affecting the purchase intentions (PIs) toward global brands using Chinese elements among Chinese consumers in China and Chinese immigrants in North America. Another aim is to examine the moderating role of acculturation in the relationship between cultural pride and PIs among Chinese immigrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted to test the hypotheses in China and North America. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the factor structure. Hierarchical regression was used to test the main effects and moderated regression analysis was used to test the moderation effect.

Findings

Results show that cultural compatibility, cultural elements authenticity (CEA) and cultural pride positively affect the PIs toward global brands with Chinese elements for both Chinese consumers and Chinese immigrants. Further, among Chinese immigrants, acculturation moderates the relationship between cultural pride and PIs.

Originality/value

This study explored the factors influencing the PIs toward global brands using Chinese elements, filling a research gap. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine how perceived CEA affects consumers’ PIs toward global brands with Chinese elements. Further, the findings have implications for global brands that want to target Chinese consumers and Chinese immigrants in overseas markets.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2008

Linda C. Ueltschy, Michel Laroche, Paulo Rita and Claudia Bocaranda

This study investigated the viability of using a Pan‐European approach for professional service offerings in Europe by first establishing measurement equivalence and then…

Abstract

This study investigated the viability of using a Pan‐European approach for professional service offerings in Europe by first establishing measurement equivalence and then exploring the influence of culture on service quality and customer satisfaction. Utilizing scenarios involving a dental office visit, respondents from Portugal, France, and Germany participated in a 2X2 factorial experiment in which the researchers manipulated both expectations (low/high) and service performance (low/high). Respondents from France and Portugal expressed similar levels of customer satisfaction and perceived service quality, which were significantly different from those of the German respondents except when both expectations and performance were low.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769810210340. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769810210340. When citing the article, please cite: Michel Laroche, Chankon Kim, Marc A. Tomiuk, (1998), “Italian ethnic identity and its relative impact on the consumption of convenience and traditional foods”, Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 15 Iss: 2, pp. 125 - 151.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Michel Laroche, Jerry A. Rosenblatt and Jacques E. Brisoux

This article presents the basic framework of the Brisoux‐Laroche conceptualisation of the brand categorisation process. Included is a complete description of the model…

Abstract

This article presents the basic framework of the Brisoux‐Laroche conceptualisation of the brand categorisation process. Included is a complete description of the model. The importance to managers of fully understanding how and why consumers categorise brands into the evoked, hold, foggy and reject sets is discussed. Sample results are presented. The major contribution is that a number of actionable marketing strategies are presented for brand managers to employ, given that they are aware of how their brand is categorised.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Michel Laroche, Chankon Kim and Takayoshi Matsui

This study empirically investigates consumers’ use of five heuristics (conjunctive, disjunctive, lexicographic, linear additive, and geometric compensatory) in the…

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4078

Abstract

This study empirically investigates consumers’ use of five heuristics (conjunctive, disjunctive, lexicographic, linear additive, and geometric compensatory) in the consideration set formation, a critical first phase before actual choice behavior. Data were collected on the selection of beer brands and fast food outlets by real consumers. Using a decomposition approach in determining the consumers’ choice heuristics, it was found that the conjunctive heuristic is the most often used decision model in the consideration set formation for the two product classes. Implications for brand managers and future research directions are developed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Annamma Joy, Chankon Kim and Michel Laroche

Using an index of English‐French Canadian ethnicity developed onthe basis of language use in various social communication situations,this study investigates the…

Abstract

Using an index of English‐French Canadian ethnicity developed on the basis of language use in various social communication situations, this study investigates the relationship between ethnicity and use (ownership) of several financial services. A significant result is found in all cases even after removing the effects of income, family life cycle and size.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Michel Laroche, Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno and Marie‐Odile Richard

Intangibility has long been studied in marketing, especially its physical aspect. This paper seeks to verify whether a branding strategy is efficient in reducing the risk…

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4889

Abstract

Purpose

Intangibility has long been studied in marketing, especially its physical aspect. This paper seeks to verify whether a branding strategy is efficient in reducing the risk perceived by customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of university students answered the measurements considering both perspectives (brands and product categories). The paper uses a three‐dimensional approach of intangibility and explores its relationships with evaluation difficulty (ED) and perceived risk (PR). These relationships were tested in two different perspectives: brands and product categories.

Findings

Two analyses were made to test the hypotheses which were generally supported. Several relationships between the variables were found, but three should be highlighted. First, it was shown that brands are more mentally intangible than product categories, which may lead to a difficulty to evaluate. Second, it was found that evaluation difficulty increases the perceived risk in the product category perspective. Third, it was found that higher involvement generates a stronger relationship between evaluation difficulty and perceived risk for the product category perspective.

Practical implications

Theoretical and managerial implications to the literature are discussed along with examples of how managers could use the findings.

Originality/value

The research incorporates prior knowledge and involvement as moderating variables of the proposed framework and reinforces their relevance to the field. The results not only show the importance of branding, but also support the argument of considering evaluation difficulty in future research.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, Michel Laroche, Marie‐Odile Richard and Axel Eggert

This paper aims to explore the association between intangibility and perceived risk using a sample of North American households. This relationship is explored within two…

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3367

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the association between intangibility and perceived risk using a sample of North American households. This relationship is explored within two purchase environments, namely online and offline. The authors also investigated the moderating effects of privacy, system security and general security concerns when purchasing in an online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was delivered to 156 households in a small town in the Midwest and collected upon completion.

Findings

The perception of risk is increased when two negatively loaded pieces of information are processed simultaneously (i.e. product intangibility and privacy concern). Furthermore, system security was identified as the most relevant concern in e‐commerce.

Research limitations/implications

The representativeness of the sample is limited. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Originality/value

The results provide interesting insights about the generalizability of previous findings based on student samples, and show the importance of privacy concerns, system security concerns, general security concerns for those purchasing in online environments.

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