Search results

1 – 10 of 101
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Kenneth Andrew Searle, Liz Ellis, Marianthi Kourti, Andrea MacLeod, Caroline Lear, Callum Duckworth, Davide Irvine, Harry Jones, Michaela King, Jessica Ling and John Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs) the opportunity to design and undertake a project researching the experiences of autistic university students.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory approach was implemented, engaging autistic university students as research assistants. All the research team except project co-ordinators were autistic. Undergraduate autistic students developed and conducted a set of semi-structured interviews, with two autistic alumni responsible for data analysis and both scheduling and moderating focus groups. Participation in dissemination of the findings was open to all.

Findings

The results included in this paper reflect a portion of the overall findings, specifically regarding the participatory approach. The findings of the study indicate the perceptions of respondents being interviewed by autistic researchers in relation to their shared understanding, facilitating positive feelings and a sense of rapport in the interview process. The PAs were able to improve their research skills through the project, which contributed constructively to their CV and allowed them to feel more positive about being autistic, and specifically about being an autistic researcher.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to discuss the challenges and benefits of including autistic participant researchers at all stages of the research project, including research design, data collection, analysis and dissemination, being co-written by both project co-ordinators and autistic project researchers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Michael Clark, Michelle Cornes, Martin Whiteford, Robert Aldridge, Elizabeth Biswell, Richard Byng, Graham Foster, James Sebastian Fuller, Andrew Hayward, Nigel Hewett, Alan Kilminster, Jill Manthorpe, Joanne Neale and Michela Tinelli

People experiencing homelessness often have complex needs requiring a range of support. These may include health problems (physical illness, mental health and/or substance misuse…

Abstract

Purpose

People experiencing homelessness often have complex needs requiring a range of support. These may include health problems (physical illness, mental health and/or substance misuse) as well as social, financial and housing needs. Addressing these issues requires a high degree of coordination amongst services. It is, thus, an example of a wicked policy issue. The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenge of integrating care in this context using evidence from an evaluation of English hospital discharge services for people experiencing homelessness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes secondary analysis of qualitative data from a mixed methods evaluation of hospital discharge schemes and uses an established framework for understanding integrated care, the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC), to help examine the complexities of integration in this area.

Findings

Supporting people experiencing homelessness to have a good discharge from hospital was confirmed as a wicked policy issue. The RMIC provided a strong framework for exploring the concept of integration, demonstrating how intertwined the elements of the framework are and, hence, that solutions need to be holistically organised across the RMIC. Limitations to integration were also highlighted, such as shortages of suitable accommodation and the impacts of policies in aligned areas of the welfare state.

Research limitations/implications

The data for this secondary analysis were not specifically focussed on integration which meant the themes in the RMIC could not be explored directly nor in as much depth. However, important issues raised in the data directly related to integration of support, and the RMIC emerged as a helpful organising framework for understanding integration in this wicked policy context.

Practical implications

Integration is happening in services directly concerned with the discharge from hospital of people experiencing homelessness. Key challenges to this integration are reported in terms of the RMIC, which would be a helpful framework for planning better integrated care for this area of practice.

Social implications

Addressing homelessness not only requires careful planning of integration of services at specific pathway points, such as hospital discharge, but also integration across wider systems. A complex set of challenges are discussed to help with planning the better integration desired, and the RMIC was seen as a helpful framework for thinking about key issues and their interactions.

Originality/value

This paper examines an application of integrated care knowledge to a key complex, or wicked policy issue.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Panikkos Poutziouris, Francis Chittenden and Nicos Michaelas

This paper documents the findings from an extensive postal survey conducted in 1997‐98, which looks at the tax affairs of small firms, both incorporated and unincorporated. Tax…

1233

Abstract

This paper documents the findings from an extensive postal survey conducted in 1997‐98, which looks at the tax affairs of small firms, both incorporated and unincorporated. Tax planning practices of small firms in the UK, and the implications of these practices on working capital and investment in these businesses, are considered. The results indicate that tax planning in most small firms is not very sophisticated and this has an effect on investment decisions in these businesses. As a result of poor tax planning practices small firms are not in a position to utilise fully all available tax reduction mechanisms. Instead they have to rely on mechanisms that can be decided upon after the accounting year end; unfortunately these involve the withdrawal of money from the business (eg pension schemes, salaries/bonuses). The results presented in this paper illustrate that the decision concerning the level of pension fund contributions and drawings/salaries, and subsequently the level of retained profits, will depend on both financial (business needs and market characteristics) as well as non‐financial (management characteristics) factors. However, the present combination of these factors in the small business sector favours the extraction of profits out of the business rather than the reinvestment of profits that will enhance the creation of wealth and employment. Based on the beliefs and expectations of small business owner/directors a number of tax incentives are discussed that the government could introduce in order to enhance the financial development and prosperity of small firms.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Johann Burgstaller and Eva Wagner

The purpose of this paper s to study the financing behavior of family firms (FF), as these differ from their small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) counterparts in their capital…

3465

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper s to study the financing behavior of family firms (FF), as these differ from their small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) counterparts in their capital structure decision, mainly due to an increased risk aversion and the desire to maintain control over the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 470 SMEs from a bank-based environment is examined for the period of 2005-2010. A dynamic panel data model is utilized to assess both the role of several capital structure determinants and the target-adjusting behavior for different subsamples of firms.

Findings

The results show that FF, whether controlled by founders or not, are relatively more leveraged. The aim to maintain long-term control and limited financing options and other factors seem crucial to the observed differences in leverage and dominate risk considerations associated with higher debt. Presumed differences in agency costs across generations do not drive capital structure decisions, as overall leverage does not differ between founder- and descendant-controlled family firms (FCFF and DCFF, respectively). Firms with a founder-chief executive officer (CEO), however, adjust faster to deviations from a target debt ratio. The effects of many proposed capital structure determinants differ across firm types, but are highly consistent with predictions from the pecking order theory.

Practical implications

Based on the results of this study, we suggest policy-makers in bank-based economies like Austria to strongly focus on mechanisms that facilitate the access to bank debt to ensure adequate allocation of finances to SMEs. This is especially important to stimulate growth and further innovation for the dominant group of FF, as they rely on debt the most to maintain family control.

Originality/value

This paper makes a novel contribution to the literature, as it combines an analysis of the capital structure of non-listed family firms (NFF) in a bank-based economy, the respective role of founder management, the dynamic adjustment to a presumed debt target and joint tests of capital structure theories.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Michaela A. Balzarova

This paper aims to investigate the potential of blockchain technology (BCT) for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper examines ecolabels’…

1114

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential of blockchain technology (BCT) for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper examines ecolabels’ effectiveness across three criteria – reducing adverse environmental and social impacts, enhancing quality and safety standards during production and service delivery and increasing producer’s trading power via decreased information asymmetry. These three categories are compared with technology’s status quo, linking use cases relevant to the enhancement of contemporary ecolabels’ effectiveness. Conclusions are drawn over BCT’s potential for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabels. The paper also offers directions for future research related to BCT and purpose-driven ecolabels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative interpretivist approach to investigate the potential BCT represents for enhancement of the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper identifies three criteria against which ecolabels can be assessed in respect to their effectiveness. Additionally, it looks for linkages between the design of ecolabels and a creation and utilisation of improved practices in a given industry. This conceptual literature review resulted in a framework for ecolabels’ effectiveness and a lens to review BCT-related literature with potential to enhance ecolabels’ design and trading practices.

Findings

There is an undeniable shift in attitude towards the adoption of BCT, stepping away from the naïve notion that BCT can fix all the problems encountered in a supply chain. On the one hand, BCT offers to better inform consumers of the green benefits ecolabelled products provide. On the other hand, a broader application of BCT currently faces a trilemma of challenges related to issues of decentralisation, security and scalability. BCT’s presence is likely to force ecolabelling organisations to review their position on the market and their intended purpose in the marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a conceptual literature review and derives with three key themes grouping ecolabels against their efficiencies. These themes provide scope for a search of relevant blockchain-embedded use cases that may or may not contribute to the enhancement of ecolabels’ impact. This is a conceptual, theoretical review of possible approaches that can be adopted by commerce with predictions relevant to ecolabels. This paper does not claim any empirical findings.

Practical implications

Despite interest BCT gained to date, the technology still deals with unresolved issues related to decentralisation, scalability and security. Many studies advise caution, and some do not view the technology as disruptive but foundational. The paper provides references to studies that assist organisations with a decision, whether it is the right time to invest in BCT or not.

Social implications

This paper adds to the ambition most ecolabels strive for, and that is to mitigate adverse environmental and social impacts production of conventional products may have. Use cases embedded in BCT offer insights into the impacts of enhanced transparency within supply chains. For example, BCT is likely to work well for improving the lives of those producing the foods we eat while informing on issues such as child labour or planting of new trees as part of an offset program.

Originality/value

This paper’s contribution is manifold. First, it delivers a qualitative conceptual analysis of principal ecolabels against their stated purpose. Second, it reviews the BCT literature and identifies cases that are able to provide perspective on the technology’s relevance to ecolabels’ effectiveness. Third, by exploring the overlap of the two concepts, this paper discusses the likelihood of future BCT’s utilisation in ecolabelling programs.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Maria Vernuccio, Michela Patrizi and Alberto Pastore

By adopting a managerial perspective, this study aims to deepen how the strategic role of brand voice is conceived in the design of in-car name-brand voice assistants (NBVAs), how…

1586

Abstract

Purpose

By adopting a managerial perspective, this study aims to deepen how the strategic role of brand voice is conceived in the design of in-car name-brand voice assistants (NBVAs), how the brand experience based on NBVAs is designed and how the NBVA brand experience might influence customer brand engagement (CBE). The ultimate aim is to develop an interpretative theoretical framework for developing voice-based branding through NBVAs.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach with the analysis of a single in-depth case study is followed: the NBVA developed in-house by Mercedes, which was the first NBVA launched in the automotive market.

Findings

In the design of the NBVA, a key role was assigned to the brand voice in developing the brand’s anthropomorphic profile. Driving safety, consistency with the corporate identity, human-like interaction, dynamic personalisation and connectivity emerged as the strategic criteria for designing the NBVA brand experience, which was oriented towards the pursuit of multiple CBE dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the qualitative empirical contribution of this study differs from statistical generalisations, the research insights are analytically generalisable. The insights emerging from the study could guide future research on voice-based branding.

Practical implications

The results may be a useful conceptual reference for managers involved in designing brand voice and brand experience based on NBVAs.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical contribution to the marketing literature about voice-based branding in an innovative experiential field, a topic that, thus, far has been poorly analysed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2023

Jung-Hoon Han, Timothy G. Pollock and Srikanth Paruchuri

Despite growing interest in misconduct spillovers – where unimplicated bystanders’ stock prices, reputations, resources, and opportunities are positively or negatively affected by…

Abstract

Despite growing interest in misconduct spillovers – where unimplicated bystanders’ stock prices, reputations, resources, and opportunities are positively or negatively affected by others’ misconduct – theory about spillovers’ antecedents has largely focused on industry or product similarity, and has used the same characteristics to argue for both positive and negative spillovers. Furthermore, limited research has considered both positive and negative spillovers together, instead focusing on one kind of spillover or the other in isolation, thereby creating a lack of theoretical integration within the literature. In this chapter, we draw on attribution theory and expectancy violations theory to explain when and how misconduct incurs positive and negative spillovers. We argue that a spillover’s valence depends on the locus of attributions made by stakeholders, where the misconduct’s causes are attributed to the perpetrator alone (i.e., an isolated attribution) – resulting in positive spillovers – or the misconduct’s causes are perceived as indicative of a systemic problem shared among a broader set of organizations (i.e., a systemic attribution), leading to negative spillovers. We further suggest that the misconduct’s nature and misconduct prevalence within a perpetrator and among other firms influences stakeholders’ attributions, and ultimately the spillover’s valence. Our theory contributes to the organizational misconduct literature by providing a unifying theoretical framework to understand both positive and negative spillovers.

Details

Organizational Wrongdoing as the “Foundational” Grand Challenge: Consequences and Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-282-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Michaela Brockmann, Linda Clarke and Christopher Winch

This paper aims to explain the distinction between educational standards and learning outcomes and to indicate the problems that potentially arise when a learning outcomes…

1122

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the distinction between educational standards and learning outcomes and to indicate the problems that potentially arise when a learning outcomes approach is applied to a qualification meta‐framework like the European Qualification Framework, or indeed to national qualification frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods used are documentary, political and conceptual analysis, with some reference to empirical work carried out in relation to other projects.

Findings

It is found that there are substantial differences between learning outcomes and standards with large educational and political implications. Furthermore, the “pure” form of learning outcomes approach contains a design flaw, which makes its coherent implementation problematic.

Research limitations/implications

The stimulation of further research on learning outcomes based approaches to qualifications and the problems that arise in their implementation.

Practical implications

The EU needs to think carefully about the fitness for purpose of the current descriptors for EQF and whether or not it is desirable to move away from a pure outcome‐based approach to qualification frameworks and meta‐frameworks.

Originality/value

As far as the authors are aware, this is the first paper to draw attention to this distinction.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Michaela Brockmann, Linda Clarke and Christopher Winch

Though the notion of competence is common terminology in European VET policy at national and supra‐national level, understandings vary widely, both across countries and within…

1443

Abstract

Purpose

Though the notion of competence is common terminology in European VET policy at national and supra‐national level, understandings vary widely, both across countries and within. The particular conceptions of competence adopted in the EQF are themselves problematic and the framework allows for a variety of interpretations. The purpose of this paper is to clarify those applied in the EQF and the vocational education and qualifications systems of particular European countries and to contribute to the development of a transnational understanding of the term, one which is compatible with a rapidly changing labour market.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on evidence from work funded by the Nuffield Foundation entitled “Cross‐national Equivalence of Vocational Skills and Qualifications”, the paper explores the various conceptions of competence in the EQF and the national systems – in particular in the sectors of construction, ICT and health – of England, Germany, France and The Netherlands.

Findings

Interpretations are located on a continuum from the comprehensive occupational model traditionally found in many European countries to the task‐focused model of the English NVQ system.

Research limitations/implications

Much developmental work involving all stakeholders is necessary to arrive at a commonly agreed conception. A broad understanding of competence would relate to the potential of labour, itself determined through the occupational capacity embodied in the qualification.

Practical implications

Zones of Mutual Trust need to be based on transnational categories of VET.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is in seeking to go beyond identifying differences by developing transnational categories and suggesting the nature of Zones of Mutual Trust for implementing the EQF.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Michela Vecchi

Provides an overview of the real business cycle research agenda, tackling the main theoretical and empirical issues. Concludes that although this methodological approach has been…

3502

Abstract

Provides an overview of the real business cycle research agenda, tackling the main theoretical and empirical issues. Concludes that although this methodological approach has been popular in terms of the number of papers published, it has not been completely convincing in providing a theory of the business cycle.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

1 – 10 of 101