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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Pravin Chopade, Michael Yudelson, Benjamin Deonovic and Alina A. von Davier

This chapter focuses on the state-of-the-art modeling approaches used in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) and the frameworks for researching and operationalizing…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the state-of-the-art modeling approaches used in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) and the frameworks for researching and operationalizing individual and group models of performance, knowledge, and interaction. We adapt several ITS methodologies to model team performance as well as individuals’ performance of the team members. We briefly describe the point processes proposed by von Davier and Halpin (2013), and we also introduce the Competency Architecture for Learning in teaMs (CALM) framework, an extension of the Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) (Sottilare, Brawner, Goldberg, & Holden, 2012) to be used for team settings.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Abstract

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Sophia Marcian Kongela

Sustainability in the built environment is rapidly gaining attention worldwide, although many developing countries have not accomplished much on the ground as many…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability in the built environment is rapidly gaining attention worldwide, although many developing countries have not accomplished much on the ground as many sustainability aspects still remain untreated. Despite their low greenhouse gas contributions to the globe, the high rate of construction activities that do not embrace sustainable practices in these countries pose challenges to the environment. Using the case of Tanzania, this study assesses the level of sustainability awareness among key stakeholders in the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a mixed-method research approach where primary data was collected using a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews with key informants comprising engineers, architects, property managers, property owners, property users and academicians from institutions of higher learning.

Findings

Results show that despite the potential for a sustainable built environment, there is a low level of awareness among key stakeholders. Whereas few architects, who were aware, admitted to have not incorporated sustainability aspects in their building design, other stakeholders did not have active roles in decision-making involving building construction projects. Compared to the rest, the awareness level of property users was the lowest. Lack of a specific policy or policy statement on sustainable building, high initial costs of sustainable building, few skilled professionals and lack of a broad choice of building materials are some of the factors accounting for the low level of sustainability adoption in the built environment.

Originality/value

The significance of this study lies within the objective of showing awareness levels of sustainability aspects among key built environment stakeholders and policymakers, which is important in devising strategies for promoting sustainable construction practices.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2016

Mark Peterson and Matthew B. Lunde

This paper reviews recent developments in marketing-related sustainable business practices (SBP) that macromarketing scholars have researched and debated for four decades…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews recent developments in marketing-related sustainable business practices (SBP) that macromarketing scholars have researched and debated for four decades. Such SBPs should be regarded as positive steps toward a future where business does more good than harm in society.

Methodology/approach

Using the approach of a literature review, this paper highlights the actions of entrepreneurs and firms to implement SBPs resulting from analysis of the interplay between markets, marketing and society. Such analysis is in the tradition of macromarketing scholarship.

Findings

The study identifies important developments about an important shift toward adopting SBPs among many firms, as well as among consumers − especially, in developed countries of the world.

Research implications

The study suggests that taking a macromarketing view offers scholars a broad lens on current complex marketplace phenomena that will prove effective in better understanding sustainability issues.

Practical implications

The results of the study underline the value of macromarketing scholarship through the last four decades. By being daring enough to consider other stakeholders other than marketers and owners of firms, macromarketers have provided scholars a more holistic understanding of business’ role in society.

Originality/value

Today, enlightened practitioners who utilize knowledge from macromarketing scholarship can gain a competitive advantage as they navigate markets increasingly influenced by a wider set of stakeholders. Such influential stakeholders include partner firms, employees, society and local communities, NGOs, media, government, as well as the environment and future generations. Scholars can gain perspective on the phenomena they investigate with such a macromarketing lens.

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Samuel Ekung, Isaac Odesola and Michael Oladokun

Across the globe, the dearth of certainty about the cost of sustainable buildings (SBs) remains a critical disincentive to their adoption. This study explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

Across the globe, the dearth of certainty about the cost of sustainable buildings (SBs) remains a critical disincentive to their adoption. This study explored the factually incorrect knowledge about the cost of SBs and their implications on adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted sequenced mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches involving a literature review, Delphi study and survey. Semi-structured and structured self-study questionnaires were administered to a random sample of green building experts, researchers and registered construction professionals with deep knowledge of SB. The dataset from 254 stakeholders was analysed for commonality, principal components and critical misperceptions using multivariate approaches.

Findings

The predominant misperceptions in the study linked low adoption of SB to cost premium, portray cost premium as a property of luxury sustainable features and suggest related practices are suitable for exemplary projects only. The critical misperceptions produced various misinterpretations that inhibit the adoption of SB through the dearth of policies, increased complexities and inflation of budget to curb perceived risks.

Practical implications

The study buttressed the imperative to improve cost information, knowledge, skills and stakeholders' risk perceptions to increase SB adoption. The results provide insight into the regional misperceptions and knowledge gaps that could explain the low adoption of SB in a typical emerging green market.

Originality/value

The study showed that the prevalent knowledge about the cost of SB among construction stakeholders are unsupported beliefs and directs attention to emerging issues critical to SBs' adoption in emerging markets.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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