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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Michael Wrigley and Stephen Hughes

Some particular valuation problems are raised by the development of buildings which are protected for reasons of historical or architectural merit. The experience of…

Abstract

Some particular valuation problems are raised by the development of buildings which are protected for reasons of historical or architectural merit. The experience of Plymouth Development Corporation in seeking to secure the regeneration of the Royal William Yard is a case in point. The Corporation was established in 1993 for a period of five years and one of its principal tasks was to find new uses for the former Royal Naval Victualling Yard which contains ten buildings scheduled as ancient monuments. The Corporation prepared a development strategy for the Yard and adjacent areas incorporating improved access and parking and a mixed‐use brief for other buildings. A compulsory purchase order was issued and, following a lengthy public inquiry, it was confirmed. MEPC was subsequently selected as lead developer with the anchor use being a factory outlet centre. Even with MEPC’s involvement there was a need for a significant level of gap funding. At the end of the Corporation’s life, in March 1998, the deal with MEPC has still to be completed and responsibility passed to English Partnerships.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Kiseol Yang

Abstract

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Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Case study
Publication date: 24 February 2017

James B. Shein and Evan Meagher

This “mini-case” summarizes the beloved Chicago Cubs' many years of futility and remarkable turnaround in the early teens of the twenty-first century. Central to the case…

Abstract

This “mini-case” summarizes the beloved Chicago Cubs' many years of futility and remarkable turnaround in the early teens of the twenty-first century. Central to the case is the concept that despite being an incredibly popular, billion-dollar franchise holding a special place in the hearts of Chicagoans for more than a century, the organization's sale from the Tribune Company in 2009 to the Ricketts family effectively required a full reboot of the company's infrastructure, akin to a startup or to a “carve-out” situation popular in the private equity world. The case resonates because the brand is easily recognizable in an industry with the unique dynamics of professional sports, and yet the company's situation features similarities to any lower-profile organization trying to build or rebuild its SG&A infrastructure from scratch.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

W. Stewart Howe

The article examines trends in the market power relationship between UK grocery manufacturers and retailers over the past 10‐15 years. It identifies the underlying causes…

Abstract

The article examines trends in the market power relationship between UK grocery manufacturers and retailers over the past 10‐15 years. It identifies the underlying causes of trends in this area, the implications for consumer welfare, and the legislative framework relating to these relations. Contributory factors to the changed market‐power relationship are relative manufacturer and retailer firm size and market share, individual manufacturing firm market dependence upon particular retailers, information technology, private label merchandise and product development activities, logistics arrangements and other vertical links between manufacturers and retailers. Aspects of welfare economics are examined as a basis for assessing consumer outcomes in this area, and past and present government legislation in the matter is considered, together with some reference to international comparisons. A case is made for some further strengthening of the relevant legislation in the UK.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Mark Palmer and Barry Quinn

In the stakeholder marketing literature, there have been calls by several researchers to expand the stakeholder domain to incorporate a broader array of stakeholders. In…

Abstract

Purpose

In the stakeholder marketing literature, there have been calls by several researchers to expand the stakeholder domain to incorporate a broader array of stakeholders. In developing this argument in this paper the authors aim to explore a set of stakeholder relationships in an international retailing context, notably those which exist between retail firms and investment banks.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical ideas are subject to empirical scrutiny from 34 in‐depth interviews with investment banks and senior retail executives from two retail multinationals.

Findings

Exploratory findings suggest that US investment banks' ideals were at odds with European retail firms – and both occupied “different thought worlds”. It is concluded that the relationships between financial stakeholders and the retail firm cannot be explained simply by reference to stylised economic interactions, but must also be examined in the light of the cultural contexts and different forms of market system within which different firms emerge, operate and interact.

Originality/value

New strategies such as internationalisation stretch resources and capabilities to a point where retailers invariably will be exposed to different stakeholder issues and stresses. Towards this end, this paper contends that the significant international re‐orientation under way in retailing must be understood within the wider context of stakeholder theory. The paper argues that the full potential of applying stakeholder marketing theory to the internationalisation process of retailers has yet to be realised. From this exploratory research, five research propositions are put forward that might serve as a guide to future research in this area.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Michael O’Donnell, Sue Williamson, Arosha Adikaram and Meraiah Foley

The purpose of this paper is to explore how human resource (HR) managers in garment factories in a Sri Lankan export processing zone (EPZ) navigated the tension between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how human resource (HR) managers in garment factories in a Sri Lankan export processing zone (EPZ) navigated the tension between their role as stewards of employee welfare and their role to maximise firm productivity in response to time and production pressures imposed by international buyers. Relatively little attention has been paid to the role of HR managers as liaisons between firms and labour. This omission is significant, given the importance of human resource management in the recruitment and retention of labour and the role of HR managers in organisational performance and regulatory compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used based on interviews with 18 HR managers, factory managers and other key informants, and 63 factory workers from 12 firms in the Katunayake EPZ. The interviews and focus groups in English were transcribed and coded into themes arising from the literature and further developed from the transcripts. Initial codes were analysed to identify common themes across the data set.

Findings

HR managers were acutely aware of the competitive pressures facing the EPZ garment factories. While examples of company welfarism were evident, HR practices such as incentive payment systems and the management of employee absences reinforced a workplace environment of long hours, work intensification and occupational injury.

Originality/value

This paper goes some way towards filling the gap in our understanding of the roles played by HR managers in garment factories in the Global South, raising theoretical debates regarding the potential for HR managers in developing countries to distance themselves from the negative consequences of HR practices such as individual and team reward systems.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Paul Jackson and Leigh Sparks

A case study of Marks and Spencer (M&S) in Hong Kong is used to explore aspects of the retail internationalisation process.

Abstract

Purpose

A case study of Marks and Spencer (M&S) in Hong Kong is used to explore aspects of the retail internationalisation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study is developed from four main sources. First, national and trade press commentary on M&S's internationalisation. Secondly, M&S's publications and statements about their international activities. Thirdly, previous research on M&S in Hong Kong, including work by the authors. Finally, informal interviews with current and former M&S management involved in the Hong Kong development. The case study is organised into a description of phases of exporting, store development and crises. This is followed by a discussion of the key internationalisation issues raised in terms of market entry, maintenance and exit. Conclusions follow.

Findings

The study emphasises that internationalisation is a non‐linear, ongoing, dynamic activity involving developments, impacts and retrenchment at a variety of levels. Implications for future research in the area are drawn.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study of a particular retailer's internationalisation process in a particular country. The processes in other retailers operating other formats and selling other products and in other countries may be different. Further case studies will allow the generation of a wider understanding of the issues.

Originality/value

The case study provides previously unpublished information on the retail internationalisation process as a whole. It encourages other comparative studies and further research into the topic.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Karla Straker, Cara Wrigley and Michael Rosemann

This study aims to gain a clearer understanding of digital channel design. The emergence of new technologies has revolutionised the way companies interact and engage with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to gain a clearer understanding of digital channel design. The emergence of new technologies has revolutionised the way companies interact and engage with customers. The driver for this research was the suggestion that practitioners feel they do not possess the skills to understand and exploit new digital channel opportunities. To gain a clearer understanding of digital channel design, this paper addresses the research question: What digital channels do companies from a wide range of industries and sectors use?

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of 100 international companies was conducted with multiple data sources to form a typology of digital “touchpoints”. The appropriateness of a digital channel typology for this study was for developing rigorous and useful concepts for clarifying and refining the meaning of digital channels.

Findings

This study identifies what digital channels companies globally currently employ and explores the related needs across industries. A total of 34 digital touchpoints and 4 typologies of digital channels were identified across 16 industries. This research helps to identify the relationship between digital channels and enabling the connections with industry.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to the growing research area of digital channels. The typology of digital channels is a useful starting point for developing a systematic, theory-based study for enabling the development of broader, comprehensive theories of digital channels.

Practical implications

Typologies and touchpoints are outlined in relation to industry, company objectives and customer needs to allow businesses to seize opportunities and optimise performance through individual touchpoints. A digital channel model as a key outcome of this research guides practitioners on what touchpoint to implement through an interrelated understanding of industry, company and customer needs.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to explore a range of industries in relation to their use of digital channels using a unique content analysis. Contributions include clarifying and refining digital channel meaning; identifying and refining the hierarchical relations among digital channels (typologies); and establishing typology and industry relationship model.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Ann‐Kristin Achleitner, Eva Lutz, Kerry Herman and Josh Lerner

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of UK fashion retailer New Look and focuses on the impact of private equity on corporate governance, employment and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of UK fashion retailer New Look and focuses on the impact of private equity on corporate governance, employment and leverage after the public‐to‐private conversion in 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a case study approach to offer in‐depth insights into the role of different parties in the deal and their perceptions. The case study is based on semi‐structured interviews with key management of New Look, partners of the private equity firms and other members of the New Look board. In addition, complements the analysis with secondary sources (e.g. analyst reports, published articles and financial data of New Look) in order to triangulate our findings.

Findings

The case presents an example of a company that pursued a public‐to‐private transaction with the support of private equity firms. The envisioned transformation process post‐transaction turned out to be highly successful with increasing efficiencies and profits as well as an increase of over 3,500 employees over four years. This paper analyses key success drivers and the role of the private equity firms in achieving this success.

Originality/value

The paper is the first in‐depth case study of a European public‐to‐private transaction with support of private equity that offers rich evidence on the impact of private equity on corporate governance, employment and leverage.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Viktoria Dalko and Michael H. Wang

The purpose of this paper is to study the mutual disruption and support of economic growth and health improvement in the last 500 years in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the mutual disruption and support of economic growth and health improvement in the last 500 years in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general review and it compares institutional development, public policy, technological advances and scientific discoveries in economic growth with those in health improvement.

Findings

The paper finds the co-existence of slower economic growth and less increasing life expectancy from 1541 to 1871 and that of faster economic growth and rising life expectancy from 1871 to 2001. It is organized health improvement that effectively propelled economic growth in the time span of 1871-2001.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may contribute to the literature on mutual enhancement between economic growth and health improvement.

Practical implications

The findings may also provide implications to the policy makers how important organized health improvement is to economic growth.

Social implications

The findings show that when UK Government was leading in organized health improvement for the population, economic grown got propelled into a faster lane.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to unveil that a socially responsible government has permanent impact on the paths of both economic and social growth. It has value to other researchers attempting to understand the mutual disruption and support of economic growth and health improvement in the historical UK.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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