Search results

1 – 10 of 909
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Michael W. Hansen and Anne Hoenen

The purpose of this paper is to re-visit and re-invigorate the oligopolistic industry perspective on multinational corporations (MNC) strategy.

Downloads
1408

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-visit and re-invigorate the oligopolistic industry perspective on multinational corporations (MNC) strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on insights from the industrial organization tradition and strategic management, the paper brings the original insights of the oligopolistic industry perspective into a modern context by outlining a conceptual framework that may guide future international business (IB) research on MNC strategy in oligopolistic industries.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how contemporary IB literature pays little attention to a key insight of the early IB literature, namely, that foreign direct investment (FDI) often is driven by strategic interaction among MNCs in oligopolistic industries. Instead, the contemporary IB literature focuses on the FDI as a way to reduce transaction costs and/or as a way to leverage and build capabilities across borders. The paper argues that progressing global concentration in many industries warrants a rediscovery of the oligopolistic perspective on FDI.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive and unique literature review of the literature on MNC strategy in oligopolistic industries. Based on this review, the paper develops a novel conceptual framework that may inspire future IB research on MNC strategy in oligopolistic industries.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Thilde Langevang, Michael W. Hansen and Lettice Kinunda Rutashobya

The purpose of this paper is to examine how female entrepreneurs navigate complex and challenging institutional environments. It draws on institutional theory and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how female entrepreneurs navigate complex and challenging institutional environments. It draws on institutional theory and the concept of response strategies to institutional pressures to explore the institutional barriers that female entrepreneurs encounter and highlights the strategies women employ to overcome them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on a case study of female entrepreneurs engaged in food processing in Tanzania. It draws on semi-structured interviews with nine female entrepreneurs, one focus group discussion with six female entrepreneurs and two semi-structured interviews with representatives from women’s business associations (WBAs).

Findings

This paper reveals a repertoire of active strategies enacted by women entrepreneurs, including advocacy through WBAs, bootstrapping, semi-informal operations, co-location of home and business, spouse involvement in the business, downplay of gender identity, reliance on persistence and passion and networking through WBAs. While these strategies involve various degrees of agency, the findings indicate that collective efforts through WBAs offer women the most promise in terms of influencing institutional structures.

Originality/value

While there is a growing body of literature examining how institutions influence female entrepreneurs, there is a dearth of knowledge on how women experience institutional complexities and actively react to institutional barriers, complexities and contradictions. This paper shows the value of analytical attention to female entrepreneurs’ agency by highlighting women’s active responses and documenting a repertoire of strategies.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Karen Panum, Michael W. Hansen and Elder Davy

Based on six case studies of self-proclaimed social enterprises (SEs) in Kenya, this paper aims to critically assess the “SE” concept in a base of the pyramid (BoP) context.

Abstract

Purpose

Based on six case studies of self-proclaimed social enterprises (SEs) in Kenya, this paper aims to critically assess the “SE” concept in a base of the pyramid (BoP) context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on multiple case studies to challenge traditional notions of SE. Six SEs operating at the BoP in Kenya are analysed. Interviews are conducted with entrepreneurs from each enterprise, during which the enterprises’ business models are mapped and scrutinised.

Findings

Based on the six case studies, the paper argues that the SE concept is challenged in a BoP context: the six Kenyan SEs viewed social and commercial orientation as equally important and mutually supportive; viewed social orientation as a competitive advantage; and did not consider social objectives as harmonious. These findings corroborate key claims of the BoP literature, e.g. that it is not possible meaningfully to distinguish social and commercial missions at the BoP as they are intertwined; that any company succeeding at the BoP will have a social impact; and that the pursuit of some social objectives may undermine the achievement of other social objectives. The overall conclusion of the paper is that in BoP environments, the concept of SE becomes illusive.

Originality/value

This paper adds perspective to existing literature on SE at the BoP and provides empirical evidence that can help shape the understanding of social business activities in East Africa. The paper demonstrates that in BoP environments, the boundaries between social and commercial enterprise become illusive.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Michael W Hansen

The literature on foreign direct investment (FDI) and the environment has paid little attention to the role of home country factors in shaping the global practices of…

Abstract

The literature on foreign direct investment (FDI) and the environment has paid little attention to the role of home country factors in shaping the global practices of multinational enterprises (MNEs). By analyzing the interface between FDI and the environment from a Danish perspective, this chapter seeks to cast light on this issue. Denmark is a small, highly open economy dominated by small and medium-sized enterprises servicing specialized niche markets for consumer products or large industrial customers. What makes the case of Danish FDI in developing countries interesting from an environmental perspective is that environmental issues for the past three decades have had an exceptionally strong position on the Danish political agenda and have earned Danish environmental regulation a reputation as among the toughest in the world. The question is whether and how this strong environmental home base has spilled over into the environmental practices of Danish MNEs in developing countries. The chapter describes how the issue of corporate environmental responsibility in developing countries reached the Danish agenda with great force in the late 1990s, embroiling a number of Danish MNEs in damaging public battles. The chapter then moves on to review the – embryonic – literature on environmental practices of Danish MNEs. The chapter concludes by discussing whether and how the environmental practices of Danish MNEs may be traced back to distinct aspects of the Danish home country context.

Details

Multinationals, Environment and Global Competition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-179-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Michael W. Hansen, Henrik Schaumburg‐Müller and Eugene Pottenger

While the implications of outsourcing have been extensively studied from the point of view of the developed country multinational corporation (MNC) and its home economy…

Downloads
2566

Abstract

Purpose

While the implications of outsourcing have been extensively studied from the point of view of the developed country multinational corporation (MNC) and its home economy, far less attention has been paid to the developing country firm (DCF) participating in the outsourcing collaboration. This article aims at presenting, evaluating, and synthesizing a number of theoretical contributions that may help build an agenda for future research on outsourcing from a DCF perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the extant theoretical literature on outsourcing, the article seeks to explicate a DCF perspective on outsourcing.

Findings

The article argues that although several theoretical domains indirectly shed light on outsourcing from a DCF perspective, they are typically approaching the issue from a macro (country) and meso (industry) level perspective and rarely explicitly apply a micro (firm) level perspective. Moreover, they tend to view DCF strategy in outsourcing collaborations as functions of MNCs' strategies, not as strategies in their own right. In order to fill this apparent lacuna in the outsourcing literature, the article reviews a number of theories that may help building a research agenda on outsourcing from a developing country perspective.

Originality/value

The article contributes to the outsourcing literature by explicating a DCF theoretical perspective on outsourcing.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Michael W. Hansen and Wencke Gwozdz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution in subsidiary performance and the factors influencing this performance based on a unique database of approximately…

Downloads
1244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution in subsidiary performance and the factors influencing this performance based on a unique database of approximately 800 multi-national company (MNC) subsidiaries in developing countries. Developed-country multi-national companies (MNCs) are increasingly establishing subsidiaries in developing countries. The potential gains are high; however, so are the risks. While the issue of subsidiary performance should be at the heart of any international business (IB) enquiry into MNC activity in developing countries, surprisingly little research has examined this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a comprehensive literature review of the IB performance literature, it is hypothesized that subsidiary performance essentially is shaped by five clusters of factors: location, industry, MNC capabilities, subsidiary role and entry strategy. These factors’ ability to explain variance in subsidiary performance is tested through a multiple regression analysis.

Findings

MNC subsidiary performance in developing countries has improved enormously in recent decades. Especially, MNC capability and subsidiary role-related factors appear to explain variance in performance, while location factors appear to have less explanatory power. This suggests that strong MNC capabilities and organization can make MNCs succeed regardless of location.

Practical implications

The key preparatory work for MNCs contemplating entry into developing countries is to carefully scrutinize internal capabilities and organization.

Originality/value

The paper presents a model for explaining variation in subsidiary performance in developing countries specifically. The paper offers unique empirical insights into the state and drivers of subsidiary performance in developing countries.

Details

The Multinational Business Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Multinationals, Environment and Global Competition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-179-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Multinationals, Environment and Global Competition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-179-8

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Progress in Psychobiology and Physiological Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-542118-8

1 – 10 of 909