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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Stephen Brown

The purpose of this paper is to celebrate the manifold contributions made by Michael Thomas, marketing professor extraordinary.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to celebrate the manifold contributions made by Michael Thomas, marketing professor extraordinary.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an exercise in autobiographical memory, coupled with the subjective personal introspective procedures advocated by many leading marketing scholars, most notably, Steven Gould and Morris Holbrook.

Findings

The paper shows that ornithology is an apt metaphor – analogy, rather – for Professor Thomas's many and varied contributions to marketing thought.

Originality/value

The paper comes closer than most to defining the quintessential Michael Thomas.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Michael Thomas Hayden, Ruth Mattimoe and Lisa Jack

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the financial decision-making process of farmers and to highlight the potential role that improved…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the financial decision-making process of farmers and to highlight the potential role that improved farm financial management (FFM) could play in developing sustainable farm enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a qualitative approach with 27 semi-structured interviews exploring farmers’ financial decision-making processes. Subsequently, the interview findings were presented to a focus group. Sensemaking theory is adopted as a theoretical lens to develop the empirical findings.

Findings

The evidence highlights that FFM has a dual role to play in farmer decision-making. Some FFM activities may act as a cue, which triggers a sensebreaking activity, causing the farmer to enter a process of sensemaking whilst some/other FFM activities are drawn upon to provide a sensegiving role in the sensemaking process. The role of FFM in farmer decision-making is strongly influenced by the decision type (strategic or operational) being undertaken and the farm type (dairy, tillage or beef) in operation.

Originality/value

The literature suggests that the majority of farmers spend little time on financial management. However, there are farmers who have quite a high level of engagement in FFM activities, when undertaking strategic farm expansion decisions. Those FFM activities help them to navigate through operational decision-making and to make sense of their strategic decision-making.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Mary Pat Sullivan, Christina Rita Victor and Michael Thomas

There is extensive empirical literature that has sought to establish the prevalence of, and risk factors for, loneliness and social isolation in later life. Traditional…

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1770

Abstract

Purpose

There is extensive empirical literature that has sought to establish the prevalence of, and risk factors for, loneliness and social isolation in later life. Traditional empirical gerontological approaches have characterised loneliness as a linear experience that is both pathological and easily relieved with external intervention. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of qualitative interview data to reveal the possible complexities in understanding loneliness, including conceptual considerations for the dynamic and multi-dimensional aspects of loneliness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on two different studies where the purpose was to qualitatively examine the meaning of loneliness in the lives of older people and how they understood loneliness in the context of their daily life (n=37).

Findings

Interviews with “lonely” older people revealed that loneliness is a complex and dynamic experience. The authors also identified a range of internal and external factors that contribute to vulnerability for loneliness as well as resources to alleviate it.

Originality/value

The dynamic and multi-dimensional characteristics of loneliness in older people may help explain why community-based interventions to diminish it may be so challenging.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Michael S Thomas BSc. GRSC. MIOSH

What is the problem? Asbestos exposure may well be the number one occupational and environmental health problem in the United Kingdom today. Actions for compensation…

Abstract

What is the problem? Asbestos exposure may well be the number one occupational and environmental health problem in the United Kingdom today. Actions for compensation regarding consequences of asbestos exposure have affected thousands of individuals and major companies and have shaken the insurance industry. For many years, how‐ever, there has also been increasing concern over the potential for asbestos exposure in public buildings, including schools and office buildings.

Details

Property Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Thomas Michael Brunner-Kirchmair and Melanie Wiener

Inspired by new findings on and perceptions of risk governance, such as the necessity of taking a broader perspective in coping with risks in companies and working…

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2593

Abstract

Purpose

Inspired by new findings on and perceptions of risk governance, such as the necessity of taking a broader perspective in coping with risks in companies and working together in interactive groups with various stakeholders to deal with complex risks in the modern world, the purpose of this paper is looking for new ways to deal with financial risks. Current methods dealing with those risks are confronted with the problems of being primarily based on past data and experience, neglecting the need for objectivity, focusing on the short-term future and disregarding the interconnectedness of different financial risk categories.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of risk governance, financial risk management and open foresight was executed to conceptualize solutions to the mentioned-above problems.

Findings

Collaborative financial risk assessment (CFRA) is a promising approach in financial risk governance with respect to overcoming said problems. It is a method of risk identification and assessment, which combines aspects of “open foresight” and the financial risk management and governance literature. CFRA is characterized as bringing together members of different companies in trying to detect weak signals and trends to gain knowledge about the future, which helps companies to reduce financial risks and increase the chance of gaining economic value. By overcoming organizational boundaries, individual companies may gain the knowledge they would probably not have without CFRA and achieve a competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

A conceptual paper like the one at hand wants empirical proof. Therefore, the authors developed a research agenda in the form of five propositions for further research.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the existing problems of financial risk identification and assessment methods. It contributes to the existing literature by proposing CFRA as a solution to those problems and adding a new perspective to financial risk governance.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Michael Thomas Moore

The purpose of this paper is to establish a data mining model for performing sentiment analysis on open-ended qualitative LibQUAL+ comments, providing a further method for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a data mining model for performing sentiment analysis on open-ended qualitative LibQUAL+ comments, providing a further method for year-to-year comparison of user satisfaction, both of the library as a whole and individual topics.

Design/methodology/approach

A training set of 514 comments, selected at random from five LibQUAL+ survey responses, was manually reviewed and labeled as having a positive or negative sentiment. Using the open-source RapidMiner data mining platform, those comments provided the framework for creating library-specific positive and negative word vectors to power the sentiment analysis model. A further process was created to help isolate individual topics within the larger comments, allowing for more nuanced sentiment analysis.

Findings

Applied to LibQUAL+ comments for a Canadian mid-sized academic research library, the model suggested a fairly even distribution of positive and negative sentiment in overall comments. When filtering comments into affect of service, information control and library as place, the three dimensions’ relative polarity mirrored the results of the quantitative LibQUAL+ questions, with highest scores for affect of service and lowest for library as place.

Practical implications

The sentiment analysis model provides a complementary tool to the LibQUAL+ quantitative results, allowing for simple, time-efficient, year-to-year analysis of open-ended comments. Furthermore, the process provides the means to isolate specific topics based on specified keywords, allowing individual institutions to tailor results for more in-depth analysis.

Originality/value

To best account for library-specific terminology and phrasing, the sentiment model was created using LibQUAL+ open-ended comments as the foundation for the sentiment model’s classification process. The process also allows individual topics, chosen to meet individual library needs, to be isolated and independently analyzed, providing more precise examination.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Michael J. Thomas, Keith Crosier, Ross Brennan and Michael Harker

To reflect on the stewardship of Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP) over the past 25 years with special attention to the purpose and mission of the journal.

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2996

Abstract

Purpose

To reflect on the stewardship of Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP) over the past 25 years with special attention to the purpose and mission of the journal.

Design/methodology/approach

A viewpoint contribution from the past, present and future editors of MIP, with considerations of the journal's focus, scope and rationale.

Findings

The requirement for academic research in marketing to be relevant to the practise of marketing is just as great as it was when the journal was founded.

Originality/value

Considered advice for contributing authors – especially those at or near the beginning of their academic careers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Adam Hoffer, Rejeana Gvillo, William Shughart and Michael Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to identify how consumption of 12 goods – alcohol, cigarettes, fast food, items sold at vending machines, purchases of food away from home…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how consumption of 12 goods – alcohol, cigarettes, fast food, items sold at vending machines, purchases of food away from home, cookies, cakes, chips, candy, donuts, bacon, and carbonated soft drinks – varies across the income distribution by calculating their income-expenditure elasticites.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on 22,681 households from 2009-2012 from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditure Survey were used. The data were analyzed using ordinary least squares regressions and Cragg’s double hurdle model which integrates a binary model to determine the decision to consume and a truncated normal model to estimate the effects for conditional (y>0) consumption.

Findings

Income had the greatest effect on expenditures for alcohol (0.314), food away from home (0.295), and fast food (0.284). A one percentage-point increase in income (approximately $428 at the mean) translated into a 0.314 percentage-point increase in spending on alcoholic beverages (approximately $1 annually at the mean). Income had the smallest influence on tobacco expenditures (0.007) and donut expenditures (−0.009).

Research limitations/implications

Percentage of a household’s discretionary budget spent on the studied goods falls substantially as income gets larger. Policies targeting the consumption of such goods will disproportionately impact lower income households.

Originality/value

This is the first manuscript to calculate income-expenditure elasticities for the goods studied. The results allow for a direct analysis of targeted consumption policy on household budgets across the income distribution.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Michael Thomas Dominik and Devika Banerji

The purpose of this paper is to descriptively characterize the demographic profiles of entrepreneurship educators (EE) in US community colleges, and include descriptive…

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1493

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to descriptively characterize the demographic profiles of entrepreneurship educators (EE) in US community colleges, and include descriptive and inferential examination of their pedagogical modalities, attitudes toward online modality, and use of teaching materials, tools and techniques, with resulting impacts and outcomes on students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzed data collected by the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship on the national landscape of community college entrepreneurship education. The useable sample included 568 responding participants from 270 US community colleges, all of whom self-identified as faculty members who teach entrepreneurship. To enhance the understanding of the findings, a small panel of EE experts was solicited to offer perspective and future study suggestions.

Findings

Ten distinct findings are offered. These include EE teaching materials, teaching modalities, use of e-learning and alternative techniques, and their relation to modalities; and examination of five distinct entrepreneurial educational outcomes and their relationship to educator use of pedagogical materials, tools and techniques.

Originality/value

Understanding effective entrepreneurship educational practices is important to globally advancing entrepreneurship education. This paper concentrates on the profiles and practices of educators in the significant but under-researched domain of US community colleges, and offers an incremental contribution and awareness of effective entrepreneurship education teaching methods.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Gerard Hastings, Roger Sugden and Mark Grindle

The financial crisis demands that we in the business academy raise our game: we either caused it by training the generation of “greed is good” MBAs who designed those…

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1999

Abstract

Purpose

The financial crisis demands that we in the business academy raise our game: we either caused it by training the generation of “greed is good” MBAs who designed those financial instruments of mass destruction, or failed to prevent it by not equipping them with appropriate caution and ethical standards. In short, we are either complicit or irrelevant. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how Michael Thomas anticipated both the causes and the lessons of the financial crisis, and made a robust call for change long before this became a mainstream concern.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the work and ideas of Michael Thomas in the context of the current financial crisis.

Findings

The paper concludes that we can respond to Michael Thomas' vision with a combination of muscular game keeping and intelligent poaching.

Practical implications

Michael Thomas's thinking has profound implications not just for marketing but the whole business sector. The newly established Stirling Institute for Socio‐Management (SISM) is responding to his call to look critically at current business models and completely reengineer our processes and procedures. SISM also argues that lessons learnt about influencing consumer behaviour can be applied to other parts of life such as social and health behaviours.

Originality/value

The paper highlights Michael Thomas's notions of a new, “social capitalism” founded on trust and transparency.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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