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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2018

Michael T. Rossler, Charles Scheer and Michael J. Suttmoeller

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether black and African-American criminal justice students perceive barriers to a police patrol career differently than white…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether black and African-American criminal justice students perceive barriers to a police patrol career differently than white students, and whether the perceptions of these barriers impact desire to enter a police patrol career.

Design/methodology/approach

The current inquiry uses a self-administered survey of over 630 undergraduate students in criminal justice classes across five public universities.

Findings

Findings suggest that African-American students differ significantly from white students in perceived social disapproval of patrol careers, respect for police and perceptions of whether the police engage in racial profiling. These perceptions display a significant indirect relationship indicating lower patrol career interest for black and African-American students compared to all other races.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations of the current inquiry include the lack of a nationally representative sample, the use of four-year university students as a sample to represent the potential police patrol applicant pool, and the use of a survey instrument to gauge respondent beliefs about patrol careers as opposed to actions they would take in pursuit of a police career.

Practical implications

Findings from the current inquiry indicate that departments may need to focus more on improving global perceptions of the police and discussing the nature of the career with recruit social support structures. Police recruiters should focus on techniques such as addressing social isolation experienced by the police rather than on decreasing standards for background checks or simply increasing awareness of police careers.

Originality/value

The current inquiry is one of the first to explore perceptions of barriers to entering a patrol career among CJ students. It is also among the first to examine the impact these perceptions have on patrol career interest. The findings may also help criminal justice instructors more fully discuss these barriers with students of color.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Michael T. Rossler

Police technology fundamentally shapes the police role, and the adoption of technology is even linked to the success of police reforms. Police adoption of emerging…

Abstract

Police technology fundamentally shapes the police role, and the adoption of technology is even linked to the success of police reforms. Police adoption of emerging technological tools changes the way police interact with citizens. The change in police citizen interactions can then have serious implications for the social control that police have over citizens, the civil liberties citizens enjoy, police accountability, and the legitimacy that the police hold in contemporary American society.

While technology impacts these critical issues in policing, not all technology adopted by the police is likely to influence their relationship with the public. As such, this chapter closely examines the ways that several emerging technologies adopted by the police (i.e., body-worn cameras (BWC), aerial surveillance, visual surveillance, social media, mapping and crime prediction, and less lethal force technology) impact issues related to social control, accountability, and legitimacy. The current literature seems to indicate that some innovations such as BWCs enhance police accountability and legitimacy, and also expand social control. Other technologies such as aerial surveillance and conducted energy devices increase social control, and display a complicated or unclear influence over police legitimacy.

Details

Political Authority, Social Control and Public Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-049-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Abstract

Details

Political Authority, Social Control and Public Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-049-9

Abstract

Details

Political Authority, Social Control and Public Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-049-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Michael Brecht

Presents a new theory about the communication structure used by ocean‐living odontocetes. Draws conclusions from eight biological singularities in dolphin communication…

1056

Abstract

Presents a new theory about the communication structure used by ocean‐living odontocetes. Draws conclusions from eight biological singularities in dolphin communication found in empirical research but not yet put into a systematic context. They suggest the interpretation that in dolphin communication information is encoded by way of SOund PAttern VAriation. Discusses the formal prerequisites of this theory; negative and positive predictions are made. Interprets both the results of Bastian's communication experiment and the scouting behaviour observed in the wild as evidence that dolphins possess a highly developed SOund PAttern VAriation LAnguage (SOPAVALA). Complements this by examining considerations concerning the evolutionary process which may have made this development possible. Discusses characteristic features of the proposed new language structure and suggests how to decode successfully and understand a dolphin's SOPAVALA, should it exist.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2009

Apu Chakraborty, Kwame McKenzie and Michael King

Background: the increased incidence of psychosis in African‐Caribbeans in the UK compared to the white British population has been frequently reported. The cause for this…

Abstract

Background: the increased incidence of psychosis in African‐Caribbeans in the UK compared to the white British population has been frequently reported. The cause for this is unclear; social factors are said to account for this increase and one factor that is often cited is discrimination.Aims and method: we have looked at two groups of psychotic patients, blacks of Caribbean origin and white British, and present a qualitative comparison of the individual's experience of unfair treatment and its perceived cause.Results: the African‐Caribbean patients did not describe more perceived discrimination than their white counterparts but were more likely to claim that their distress was due to racial discrimination perpetrated by the psychiatric services and society in general. The white patients were more likely to attribute perceived discrimination to their mental illness.Conclusion: this mismatch of explanatory models between black patients and their doctors may account for some inequalities in their treatment, their relative non‐engagement and adverse outcome.Declaration of interest: none.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2004

Abstract

Details

Functional Structure and Approximation in Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-861-4

Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Ugo Guarnacci

This chapter is in line with the strand of literature on urban environmental stewardship and examines how cities around the world have been teaming up with each other in…

Abstract

This chapter is in line with the strand of literature on urban environmental stewardship and examines how cities around the world have been teaming up with each other in order to foster cocreation and codeployment of nature-based solutions (NBS) to tackle global environmental challenges and promote climate-resilient communities. This chapter describes such an effort that cities made to build international alliances and networks as a new wave of “city diplomacy.” Indeed, recent environmental negotiations at the global level on sustainable development and climate change have proven how cities of different size, with diverse socioeconomic and environmental conditions, were able to put NBS on the agenda and show their transformative power for the common good. Throughout the chapter, the European policy context is always placed at the meso level, between the macro (international arena) and the micro (city) dimensions, in order to demonstrate how the European Union has been instrumental in connecting the global, regional, and local agendas on NBS for renaturing cities.

Details

Nature-Based Solutions for More Sustainable Cities – A Framework Approach for Planning and Evaluation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-637-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Isidor Wallimann

The author is interested in variations by age in women's attitudes to the military and defence and support for women's participation in the military. Analysis of public…

Abstract

The author is interested in variations by age in women's attitudes to the military and defence and support for women's participation in the military. Analysis of public opinion data suggests that women in Switzerland have substantial and consistently non‐militaristic leanings which the author seeks to explain.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Elin Palm

The purpose of this paper is to investigate ethical implications of surveillance by means of the care software “I‐Care” in the Swedish home‐help service sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate ethical implications of surveillance by means of the care software “I‐Care” in the Swedish home‐help service sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A small‐scale interview study on home helpers' experiences of and reactions to the implementation of the care software “I‐Care” in their workspace has been conducted. The interview serves as the starting point for an ethical analysis of the impact of the care software “I‐Care” on key values within ethics: privacy, autonomy and equality.

Findings

The implementation and use case of surveillance capable technology in a home‐help service sector is assessed from the perspective of ethics. It is concluded that employees' level of awareness, access to sufficient and relevant information, as well as their chances of influencing surveillance conduct, are significant for their acceptance of the surveillance regime.

Originality/value

Surveillance in the home‐help service setting has been investigated from the perspective of ethnology and organizational studies but not, as here, from the perspective of ethics. Conditions for the ethical acceptance of workspace surveillance are suggested.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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