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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Fei Jin Ying, Michael O’Sullivan and Ivo Adan

Materials supply is one of the important elements in construction operation and a major factor affecting the quality of construction projects. Many industries look to…

Abstract

Purpose

Materials supply is one of the important elements in construction operation and a major factor affecting the quality of construction projects. Many industries look to manage materials effectively by attempting to integrate logistics processes into logistics chains of suppliers and customers. Logistics processes, being crucial for successful completion of construction projects, but in fact, auxiliary, are often entrusted to external professionals specialised in logistic services, such as logistics centres. However, this tendency is yet to be developed in construction. The purpose of this paper is to develop a simulation framework for the examination of potential improvements of logistics performance using logistics centres.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was adopted with computer simulation using Flexsim. Data of vehicle movements were collected during construction on-site from the start of construction to “hand-over” to the building owner.

Findings

The ideal location of a logistics centre is identified using vehicle movements data collected on the site. The potential improvements of the planned centre are then evaluated by simulating various scenarios of vehicle movements. The enclosed results from the simulations indicate that using a logistics centre will reduce waste for the construction project considered.

Originality/value

The paper emphasises that creating a logistics centre for a project can improve construction logistics performance, by consolidating and optimizing both off-site and on-site logistics, especially when the site condition is prohibitive (small footprint with limited loading bay area). Establishing logistics centres may help find ways of making the overall construction project more effective by improving the management of materials.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ron E. Scrogham

To argue that the future of the US public library depends on a commitment to the library as a place within the public sphere for the intellectual development of a…

Abstract

Purpose

To argue that the future of the US public library depends on a commitment to the library as a place within the public sphere for the intellectual development of a community primarily through books and reading, where service to the public is framed by professional librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses supportive literature from within and outside librarianship to provide an alternative perspective to Michael Sullivan's Public Libraries' article of 2003, which argues that the future of the public library is fragile because of its inflexibility before the pressures of the internet, failing public commitment, and a potential shortage of librarians.

Findings

Public libraries continue to be identified as places for reading and books. Despite the public's embrace of the internet for ready reference, there are still questions best answered through print reference materials and professional assistance. Through active collection development, libraries remain places of heterogeneity and serendipitous discovery. The fragility of the public library is attributable to the incursion of a market‐capitalist model of service into an institution of the public sphere. Deprofessionalization threatens to lose a corps of professionals committed to values of civil liberties and community.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that the future of the public library depends on its commitment to being a place for books and reading, as an alternative to a model of service based on the Internet, the bookstore, and a paraprofessional staff. The paper should be of use to those who provide, design, manage, and teach models of service in the public library.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

Jonas Pontusson

For comments on a previous draft, I wish to thank Mary O’Sullivan, Michael Shalev and Bruce Western.

Abstract

For comments on a previous draft, I wish to thank Mary O’Sullivan, Michael Shalev and Bruce Western.

Details

Capitalisms Compared
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-414-0

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Michael K. O'Sullivan and Connie J. O'Sullivan

To examine the strategies of the intelligent design (ID) movement and their impact on the selection policies for high school libraries and the science curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the strategies of the intelligent design (ID) movement and their impact on the selection policies for high school libraries and the science curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines the process four public high school libraries in the US took to determine whether to accept a gift offer by a parent of two books, dealing with ID. This article deals with the importance of applying selection criteria to all materials, whether gifts or recommendations.

Findings

School libraries are not immune to the tactics used by the ID movement to influence curriculum and collection development decisions.

Research limitations/implications

While this article is a case history of the ID movement's strategy to influence school curriculum, its implications and possible impact on other schools and their libraries.

Practical implications

Provides advice to practicing school librarians on what criteria to use when selecting materials and poses the question of who should be involved in selecting materials for the school library.

Originality/value

This article explores the critical aspects and the differences between selection and censorship. Emphasizes the importance of having and following board‐approved policies that deal with gifts and the selection of library and instructional materials.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Kai Fan, Anthony Brabazon, Conall O'Sullivan and Michael O'Neill

Following earlier claims that quantum‐inspired evolutionary algorithm (QIEA) may offer advantages in high‐dimensional environments, the purpose of this paper is to test a…

Abstract

Purpose

Following earlier claims that quantum‐inspired evolutionary algorithm (QIEA) may offer advantages in high‐dimensional environments, the purpose of this paper is to test a real‐valued QIEA on a series of benchmark functions of varying dimensionality in order to examine its scalability within both static and dynamic environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares the performance of both the QIEA and the canonical genetic algorithm (GA) on a series of test benchmark functions.

Findings

The results show that the QIEA obtains highly competitive results when benchmarked against the GA within static environments, while substantially outperforming both binary and real‐valued representation of the GA in terms of running time. Within dynamic environments, the QIEA outperforms GA in terms of stability and run time.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that QIEA has utility for real‐world high‐dimensional problems, particularly within dynamic environments, such as that found in real‐time financial trading.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Stuart Ferguson

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2011

Bruce D. Meyer and James X. Sullivan

We examine the relationship between the business cycle and poverty for the period from 1960 to 2008 using income data from the Current Population Survey and consumption…

Abstract

We examine the relationship between the business cycle and poverty for the period from 1960 to 2008 using income data from the Current Population Survey and consumption data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey. This new evidence on the relationship between macroeconomic conditions and poverty is of particular interest, given recent changes in antipoverty policies that have placed greater emphasis on participation in the labor market and in-kind transfers. We look beyond official poverty, examining alternative income poverty and consumption poverty, which have conceptual and empirical advantages as measures of the well-being of the poor. We find that both income and consumption poverty are sensitive to macroeconomic conditions. A 1 percentage point increase in unemployment is associated with an increase in the after-tax income poverty rate of 0.9–1.1 percentage points in the long run, and an increase in the consumption poverty rate of 0.3–1.2 percentage points in the long run. The evidence on whether income is more responsive to the business cycle than consumption is mixed. Income poverty does appear to be more responsive using national level variation, but consumption poverty is often more responsive to unemployment when using regional variation. Low percentiles of both income and consumption are sensitive to macroeconomic conditions, and in most cases, low percentiles of income appear to be more responsive than low percentiles of consumption.

Details

Who Loses in the Downturn? Economic Crisis, Employment and Income Distribution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-749-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Michael A. Sullivan and Krishnan Dandapani

This paper analyzes the special character of currency risks associated with equity investments in emerging capital markets. Such investments are an important and growing…

Abstract

This paper analyzes the special character of currency risks associated with equity investments in emerging capital markets. Such investments are an important and growing source of funds for financing projects which contribute to the rapid pace of growth in emerging markets. While investors in any foreign market face the consequences of possible changes in the value of foreign currency, uncertainty about the terms for currency conversion in emerging markets are aggravated by the interaction of capital flows and currency values, particularly for countries which rely heavily on external sources of financing. In such an environment, it is essential for investors to understand the characteristics of currency risk in order to incorporate them in their investment decisions. This paper analyzes equity market returns and currency fluctuations in a group of emerging markets by comparing them to a set of developed countries. By traditional measures of risk emerging markets appear to have low levels of currency risk. This paper demonstrates that there has also been substantial changes in currency risk in emerging markets which have not occurred in developed markets. This paper also discusses methods of hedging currency risk, taking into account the limitations on hedging strategies in emerging markets and the special characteristics of currency risks in those markets.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Abstract

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Lorman Lundsten, Mary Daugherty, James Shovein, Michael Sullivan, Heino Beckmann and David Vang

The article attempts to determine whether academic research in the area of finance has a direct link to the practitioners in the field.

Abstract

Purpose

The article attempts to determine whether academic research in the area of finance has a direct link to the practitioners in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a survey of over 50 finance practitioners to ask their opinion on the relevance of academic finance journals to their respective jobs.

Findings

The results suggest that most business practitioners are more interested in proprietary research than in generally distributed academic research, the academic peer‐review process seems to reduce the interest of practitioners in academic research due to the time lag between the findings of research and their publication, and the statistical significance of academic research results does not interest practitioners as much as the immediate relevance of the research findings to their respective jobs.

Originality/value

A review of the literature suggests this might be one of the first papers to actually test the hypothesis that academic finance research has a direct transference to the finance industry.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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