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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Michael Stevens, Allan Bird, Mark E. Mendenhall and Gary Oddou

Based on a review of multiple literatures, a comprehensive content domain of essential intercultural competencies for effective global leaders is presented. This domain is…

Abstract

Based on a review of multiple literatures, a comprehensive content domain of essential intercultural competencies for effective global leaders is presented. This domain is then used to guide the development of the Global Competencies Inventory (GCI), a 160-item self-report measure that assesses the degree to which individuals possess the intercultural competencies that are associated with global leader effectiveness. Using sample sizes ranging from several hundred to nearly 9,000 subjects, evidence from several studies is presented showing the GCI to have convergent validity, predictive validity, and freedom from demographic and ethnic subgroup biases. Implications for theory and future research are also discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Allan Bird, Mark Mendenhall, Michael J. Stevens and Gary Oddou

Research on expatriation and global leadership has been characterized by wide variations in defining what constitutes intercultural competence. Greater progress can be…

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Abstract

Purpose

Research on expatriation and global leadership has been characterized by wide variations in defining what constitutes intercultural competence. Greater progress can be achieved if a comprehensive definition of the intercultural competence domain can be established, particularly with regard to the specific context of global leadership. This paper aims to focus on the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct an extensive review of the global leadership and expatriation literatures, integrating and synthesizing prior theoretical and empirical efforts to develop a comprehensive domain definition for intercultural competence in the context of global leadership.

Findings

The domain of intercultural competence in the context of global leadership comprised three dimensions – perception management, relationship management and self management. Each dimension is characterized by facets that further delineate aspects of intercultural competence.

Research limitations/implications

The domain definition of intercultural competence for global leadership appears to be well supported in prior theoretical and empirical work focusing on expatriation and global leadership; however that work was fragmented in nature. A test of the comprehensive model, i.e. all three dimensions and 17 facets, is called for, as well as the validation of an instrument that measures them.

Originality/value

The paper integrates and synthesizes the extensive body of theoretical and empirical work related to intercultural competence and clearly establishes the content domain, thereby enhancing the efficacy of future theoretical and empirical efforts.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Abstract

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2016

Abstract

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-138-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Ladipo Adamolekun

Reviews the crisis of the inherited career Civil Service system inSub‐Saharan African countries and argues for a small career service thatwould be adjusted to the…

Abstract

Reviews the crisis of the inherited career Civil Service system in Sub‐Saharan African countries and argues for a small career service that would be adjusted to the imperatives of a market economy and political pluralism. Concludes with suggestions on the rationalization of employment and pay, the enhancement of efficiency and productivity and capacity building.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Jennifer C. Coats and Frederick W. Rankin

Despite the benefits of delegation, anecdotal and survey-based evidence suggests that firms do not optimally delegate decision-making authority. However, to date, no…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the benefits of delegation, anecdotal and survey-based evidence suggests that firms do not optimally delegate decision-making authority. However, to date, no quantifiable evidence supports this claim.

Methodology/approach

We design an experiment to explore the superior’s choice between delegation and information elicitation. We also examine the effect of the superiors’ choice on the amount of effort provided by subordinates to gather decision-facilitating information.

Findings

We find that, compared to economic predictions, superiors delegate less often than they should. Subordinates exert lower effort when superiors elicit information than when superiors delegate the decision to them. As a result, superiors earn lower profit when they elicit information than when they delegate decision-making authority.

Research implications

Our empirical evidence supports two main tenets espoused in the literature on the allocation of decision rights. First, the evidence of under delegation contributes to the literature which maintains that superiors’ tendency to under-delegate leads firms to become overly centralized.

Originality/value

By designing a novel experimental, we identify systematic ways in which behavior deviates from economic theory and contribute to the discussion on how firms utilize information. In particular, under delegation prevents firms from exploiting economies that arise from local capabilities and task specialization, and results in forgone profits.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-972-5

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Case study
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Michael M. Goldman, Mignon Reyneke and Tendai Mhizha

This case allows students to engage with classical marketing tenets of branding, media and communications decisions and content marketing within a management framework.

Abstract

Subject area

This case allows students to engage with classical marketing tenets of branding, media and communications decisions and content marketing within a management framework.

Study level/applicability

This case is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate-level programme in marketing management.

Case overview

Suzanne Stevens was part of a group of four former senior employees of a large life insurance firm that decided to establish a new and innovative South African insurance company, BrightRock. They identified a gap in a large and highly competitive (albeit generic and opaque) insurance market and developed a distinctive positioning within the market. There was low consumer understanding of the technical aspects of life insurance products, and no existing life insurance product provided an individualized offering. Stevens developed the company’s brand and marketing strategy by drawing on reputation drivers, traditional advertising and a content marketing approach. BrightRock focused on change moments in consumers’ lives, including getting married, having children or getting a new job, and changed the standard insurance product model by launching an individualized flexible product that could adapt with the consumer through their various life stages. The case study documents the first three years of BrightRock’s operations, with a strong focus on brand and product development, distribution and communication. The case dilemma involves choices Stevens faced at the beginning of 2015 about marketing investments across paid, earned and owned media.

Expected learning outcomes

This study enables to critique the development of a services brand; integrate paid, owned and earned media to increase communication effectiveness and efficiency; and critique a content marketing strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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