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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

D. Hywel E. Roberts and Jean Everitt

This paper reports on a project which aimed to ascertain current and anticipated use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in museums in Wales. The project…

Abstract

This paper reports on a project which aimed to ascertain current and anticipated use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in museums in Wales. The project also traced the primary ICT trends in the museum community worldwide, and listed relevant contemporary policy and project initiatives and funding sources in the UK. The main findings – applications, the resource and other issues, barriers to development, the perceived value of ICT in museum work, and the main project outcomes and recommendations are listed.

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Program, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Recently at the Westland Helicopters facility at Yeovil Somerset, Rear Admiral Michael F. Simpson RN, Director General Aircraft (Naval), inspected the first production…

Abstract

Recently at the Westland Helicopters facility at Yeovil Somerset, Rear Admiral Michael F. Simpson RN, Director General Aircraft (Naval), inspected the first production version of the Sea King Mk2 Airborne Early Warning (AEW) helicopter, equipped with the successful THORN EMI Searchwater AEW radar.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Michael Simpson

Service centers work with customers to ensure that raw materials will be delivered “when needed, as needed,” and processed to the dimensions required.

Abstract

Service centers work with customers to ensure that raw materials will be delivered “when needed, as needed,” and processed to the dimensions required.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Michael Simpson

Abstract

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1988

Jon Sharp has been appointed as the new managing director of Qualitair Aviation Ltd, London Stanstead Airport, one of three subsidiary companies within the Qualitair…

Abstract

Jon Sharp has been appointed as the new managing director of Qualitair Aviation Ltd, London Stanstead Airport, one of three subsidiary companies within the Qualitair Aviation Group.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 60 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Peter Dawkins and Michael Simpson

The length of the working week and the flexibility of working time aretwo aspects which impact on the international competitiveness ofAustralian industry. The popular view…

Abstract

The length of the working week and the flexibility of working time are two aspects which impact on the international competitiveness of Australian industry. The popular view of the Australian worker is often couched in terms such as “lazy” and “slack”, and the “sickie” appears to have gained a permanent place in Australian vocabulary. Presents evidence, however, which tends to suggest that the lazy “tag” may be somewhat inappropriate. Comparison of the Australian estimates on hours of work with international data obtained from the OECD and the ILO indicates that Australian full‐time workers are working more hours than most other OECD countries. Also, full‐time employees are working considerably longer hours than they did a decade ago. Puts forward four primary reasons for this increase in hours worked by full‐time employees: (1) a substantial increase in the proportion of employees working in excess of 48 hours per week; (2) a decrease in absence rates over the last ten years; (3) a decline in the amount of annual and long service leave taken by full‐time employees; and (4) a significant decrease over the last decade in time lost owing to industrial disputes. Of greater concern is the flexibility of working time. Evidence suggests, for example, that penalty rates of pay and working time restrictions have tended to spread through the award system to an extent that is not healthy for Australian industry. While there has been some relaxation of these rigidities, it is thought that there is considerable scope for further moves in this direction.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Mike Simpson, Jo Padmore, Nick Taylor and Jane Frecknall‐Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to report on a full‐scale testing of the role of marketing and its relevance in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The objective is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a full‐scale testing of the role of marketing and its relevance in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The objective is to present the results of a rigorous assessment of a new model of marketing in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist approach relied on the use of the hypothetico‐deductive method to produce the theoretical model. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were applied to investigate the model. This paper reports on a large‐scale questionnaire survey, follow‐up interviews with SMEs owner‐managers and the use of published accounts to show how companies have performed during this study.

Findings

The role and relevance model of marketing in SMEs has been thoroughly investigated and tested. The model offers a straightforward way of diagnosing the situation within an SME. The simplicity of the model allows for a clearer understanding of what is often a complex and messy situation within these companies and their business environment. Some findings suggest a positive link between a company's financial performance and its approach to marketing within the model.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that the model goes a long way to explaining the behaviour of SMEs with regard to marketing. The model appears to be viable and could be used to analyse and diagnose the situation regarding marketing within SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique theoretical and practical insight into the issue of marketing in SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Christine Unruh

Burnt by the foibles of celebrity spokespeople, more and more companies are turning their corporate images (and fortunes) over to animated characters. Is that a good…

Abstract

Burnt by the foibles of celebrity spokespeople, more and more companies are turning their corporate images (and fortunes) over to animated characters. Is that a good strategic move? Tony, for one, thinks it's G‐G‐G‐G‐Great!

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2021

Dixie Abernathy

During the months leading up to and immediately following President Donald Trump’s election, the unique intersection of classroom academic freedom and teacher and…

Abstract

During the months leading up to and immediately following President Donald Trump’s election, the unique intersection of classroom academic freedom and teacher and students’ first amendment rights would be duly tested, as headlines reminded citizens, parents, and pundits that the reach of raw emotions and political viewpoints did not stop at the schoolhouse door. School and classroom-based events would eventually test the norms of community, the interpretation of legal precedents, the resolve of district and school leadership, and the rights or limits thereof of the teachers themselves. This analysis is grounded on case studies of eight such incidents, all of which occurred at the high school level in public school districts. These eight cases are analyzed in terms of the incidents, the teacher’s actions or speech, the consequences, the relevant legal precedents surrounding academic freedom, the parental, student, and community reaction, and the short- and long-term impacts moving forward.

Details

Academic Freedom: Autonomy, Challenges and Conformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-883-3

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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Hassan R. HassabElnaby, Ahmed Abdel-Maksoud and Amal Said

Decision-making rationality is said to be bounded by managers’ cognitive capabilities. Recent studies indicate that accounting functions evolved to augment the cognitively…

Abstract

Decision-making rationality is said to be bounded by managers’ cognitive capabilities. Recent studies indicate that accounting functions evolved to augment the cognitively bounded human brain in handling complex economic exchanges. The neuroscience discipline suggests that human brains have the ability to implement “automatic” processes of positive versus negative emotional stimuli to make rational decisions. Neuroscientific evidence shows that the activations in the ventral striatum decrease with negative emotional information/motives and increase with positive emotional information/motives. The authors, hence, argue that our understanding of the decision-making rationality in financial and managerial decisions could be enhanced by using a functional neuroimaging approach.

Decision-making rationality has been focal in debt covenant violation and earnings management research. The contracting theory predicts a relationship between managers’ decisions and the proximity of violating debt covenants. However, no prior research has investigated brain activities associated with the evaluation of debt covenant violation and earnings management. Meanwhile, in another strand of research, there is an extensive prior literature concerning the consequences of managers’ decisions and the use of accounting information in relation to their evaluative style, i.e., supervisory style. The authors argue that the relationship between the proximity to debt covenants violation and earnings management incentives is contingent upon managers’ supervisory style. However, no previous research has examined the impact of the supervisory style on earnings management in the context of the proximity to debt covenants violation and other earnings management incentives.

In this research note, we argue that neuroaccounting could be relied on to examine the relationship between the proximity to debt covenants and earnings management, contingent upon managers’ supervisory style, by capturing brain activities. The adoption of the neuroscience functional neuroimaging approach in this field should contribute to the understanding of managers’ behaviors and provide implications for research and practitioners. The goal of this research note is to provide a new avenue for future research in this field.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-527-6

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