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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Mahendrawathi ER, Carola Funke, Michael Rosemann, Franziska Goetz and Tabitha Marie Wruck

Trust is an increasingly important requirement for any business and as a result has become a contemporary design criterion for business processes. However, the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Trust is an increasingly important requirement for any business and as a result has become a contemporary design criterion for business processes. However, the literature to date is very much focused on the technical (security) aspects, which are provider centric, as opposed to trust that is customer centric. In this paper, the authors extended an initial meta-model of trust-aware process design by proposing a way to capture trust-intensity for four trust dimensions, i.e. input, people, process and output and an organizational trust position. The authors also investigate the deployment of the extended meta-model in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature study is conducted to derive an understanding of the dimension's customer trust when interacting with an organization. Based on the findings of the literature review and a previously developed trust meta-model, the authors propose a way to describe an organizational trust position, i.e. the depiction of how much uncertainty is prevalent in the trust dimensions. Next, the authors conducted an exploratory case study using secondary data to validate the extended meta-model.

Findings

The case study demonstrated the applicability of the extended trust meta-model and derived actionable practices. In this case, the Indonesian food delivery company GoFood, the authors identified trust concerns in the input, process, resources and output of their business at the start of their operations. Since then, GoFood took specific actions to reduce their operational, behavioral and perceived uncertainty and these identified trust concerns. To a lesser degree, GoFood has managed vulnerability issues and invested in measures to increase customers' confidence. As a result of reduced uncertainties, GoFood's business has grown and became the number one in food service delivery in Indonesia.

Research limitations/implications

The approach to capture trust (in the trust dimensions) is still a simplified version and a pre-step for a fully developed management tool or method. The use of a secondary data from a single case study also limits the validity and generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The extended meta-model proposed in this paper has several implications related to the organization's BPM capabilities. The result also demonstrates how trust measures related to reducing uncertainty, reducing vulnerability and increasing confidence can be applied in practice. Strategies used by the case company presented here such as rating systems to increase confidence can be used by other firms within a similar context.

Social implications

Having an empirically validated framework for the management of trust, allows organizations to execute an operational model for the development of trusted engagement with the main benefactor being the customer.

Originality/value

Previous trust-related studies focused on conceptual ideas only, relied on fictive examples or were very much focused on the technical (security) aspects of business processes. This study is the first empirical validation of a trust meta-model that serves managers to understand their trust position and to guide trust-building actions.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Haleh Moattar, Wasana Bandara, Udo Kannengiesser and Michael Rosemann

Business process modelling integrates and visualizes relevant information essential for managing day-to-day business operations. It plays a critical role in the design and…

Abstract

Purpose

Business process modelling integrates and visualizes relevant information essential for managing day-to-day business operations. It plays a critical role in the design and execution of business transformations. Recognizing the role of process modelling, a large number of modelling languages, methods and techniques have been developed, each offering diverse advantages and having inherent limitations. Traditional and popular process modelling approaches focus on the exact specification of the control flow of business processes, whereas more recent approaches like Subject-oriented Business Process Management (S-BPM) are focused on the communication between process participants. This study aims to provide comparative insights about these two approaches through their experimental application. This study does so by comparing Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN); a control flow approach, with S-BPM; a communication approach, with a specific focus on their suitability for novice modellers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on an exploratory experiment that compares BPMN to S-BPM. Applying cognitive load theory, this study compares the experiences and outcomes of novice process modellers, assessing perceived ease of use, model quality (syntactic and semantic) and modelling efficiency (time to model) across the two approaches.

Findings

Study results show that S-BPM (a communication approach) led to significantly better user performances for process modelling than BPMN (a control flow approach). This study points to how a different modelling approach such as S-BPM could be either considered as an alternative or to complement the more popular control flow approach BPMN. This observation was especially relevant for modelling contexts where domain experts are novice process modellers.

Originality/value

This study provides the first empirical evidence that communication approaches like S-BPM could outperform modelling approaches which are control-flow based (i.e. BPMN), especially when being used by novice process modellers who hold the domain and process knowledge. This study uses this as a springboard to present important considerations for practice and guide future process modelling research.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2017

Sabiölla Hosseini, Alexandra Kees, Jonas Manderscheid, Maximilian Röglinger and Michael Rosemann

In a world of ever-changing corporate environments and reduced product life cycles, most organizations cannot afford anymore to innovate on their own. Hence, they open…

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Abstract

Purpose

In a world of ever-changing corporate environments and reduced product life cycles, most organizations cannot afford anymore to innovate on their own. Hence, they open their innovation processes to incorporate knowledge of external sources and to increase their innovation potential. As the shift toward open innovation (OI) is difficult and makes many initiatives fail, the question arises which capabilities organizations should develop to successfully implement OI. As the literature encompasses mature but isolated streams on OI capabilities, there is a need for an integrated capability framework. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes the open innovation capability framework (OICF) that compiles and structures capabilities relevant for implementing OI. The OICF covers the outside-in and coupled processes of OI. To integrate multiple streams of the OI literature, the OICF builds on a structured literature review. The OICF was also validated in a two-step review process with OI experts from academia and industry.

Findings

The OICF comprises 23 capability areas grouped along the factors such as strategic alignment, governance, methods, information technology, people, and culture. To analyze the existing body of knowledge on OI capabilities, the authors compare the OICF with other OI-related capability frameworks and compile a heatmap based on the results of the literature review. The authors also discuss the experts’ feedback on individual factors of the OICF as well as on interdependencies among these factors.

Practical implications

The OICF provides practitioners with a structured overview of the capabilities to consider when implementing OI. Based on the OICF, practitioners can define the scope of their OI initiatives. They can use the OICF as a foundation for prioritizing, selecting, and operationalizing capability areas as well as for deriving implementation roadmaps.

Originality/value

The OICF is the first framework to take a holistic perspective on OI capabilities. It integrates mature but isolated research streams of OI. It helps practitioners define the scope of OI initiatives and academics gain insights into the current state of the art on OI capabilities.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Wasana Bandara, Guy Grant Gable, Mary Tate and Michael Rosemann

Business process modelling (BPMo) projects are core to digital transformation projects as they provide the conceptual foundation to the orchestration of technologies along…

Abstract

Purpose

Business process modelling (BPMo) projects are core to digital transformation projects as they provide the conceptual foundation to the orchestration of technologies along a process. Yet, success factors of BPMo projects have received little research attention to date. This study empirically validates a BPMo project success model, pointing to normative practice guidelines and important future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reports on the quantitative re-specification and validation of a business process modelling success model, employing survey responses from 261 process modellers worldwide.

Findings

The study distilled and validated a final set of success antecedents: Top Management Support, Project Management Capabilities, Stakeholder Input, Modeller Expertise and Modelling Tool Usage; and clearly evidences their relationships with each other and with two moderating variables – Importance and Complexity. The paper offers a nuanced explanation of the indirect role of top management support in building stakeholder involvement and explains how complex projects that are perceived as important being more likely to attract high levels of necessary stakeholder involvement. The authors conclude that top management needs to create an environment of co-ordinated excellence which spans both technical skills and resources, and a high level of committed engagement between stakeholders and technicians in order for BPMo projects to succeed.

Originality/value

This study is the first to operationalize and quantitatively test antecedents of BPMo project success and their interactions, presenting novel insights into how the success factors interact. Awareness of the more influential antecedents of successful process modelling projects offers valuable guidance for the planning, management and conduct of BPMo projects.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Samia Mazhar, Paul Pao-Yen Wu and Michael Rosemann

A configurable reference model can be used to assist in the development and management of business processes in complex, multi-stakeholder environments. The purpose of…

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Abstract

Purpose

A configurable reference model can be used to assist in the development and management of business processes in complex, multi-stakeholder environments. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a process design in such environments via configurable process reference modelling, using airports as an example.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing reference modelling methods around process modelling, merging and configuration are extended to include contextual and spatial factors using the design science methodology. The approach is empirically based on a set of business process management notation (BPMN) models for international passenger departures, consolidated from five Australian airport case studies via document analysis, interviews and observation.

Findings

The use of contextual factors and operational scenarios, structured using the proposed approach, facilitated efficient cross-organisational comparison for configuring processes to suit the needs of a target organisation. The resulting configurable model integrates the perspectives of organisational stakeholder groups with that of the customer in a transparent and unambiguous graphical representation. It is a reusable tool with low data collection needs for each use.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should include: version management; how to keep the model current; configurability via modelling objects other than gateways; and cross-discipline application (e.g. as a foundation for quantitative decision-making models).

Originality/value

This is the first reported application of configurable reference modelling to airport passenger facilitation. Methodological contributions include the addition of space-sensitive process elements and notation to BPMN; guidelines for systematically deriving contextual factors associated with process variants across similar organisations; and overall normative guidelines for inductively developing a configurable process reference model.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Thomas Kohlborn, Oliver Mueller, Jens Poeppelbuss and Maximilian Roeglinger

More than two decades after the early works about Business Process Management (BPM) were published by the discipline's thought-leaders of that time, the authors were…

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Abstract

Purpose

More than two decades after the early works about Business Process Management (BPM) were published by the discipline's thought-leaders of that time, the authors were interested in getting an assessment of what BPM has been able to achieve so far, what promises have been fulfilled, and where BPM should be heading in the future. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the above issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an interview with Professor Michael Rosemann, one of today's authorities in the BPM field, who shared with us his thoughts on ambidextrous BPM.

Findings

According to Michael Rosemann, the BPM community has, since its conception, put much effort in mastering exploitative BPM that focusses on analyzing and automating single processes as well as on improving such processes step-by-step. However, explorative BPM, which emphasizes radical process change, process innovation and the enabling of new business models, still is in its infancy. Professor Rosemann therefore calls for ambidextrous BPM integrating exploitative and explorative capabilities, more interdisciplinary as well as a closer collaboration between academia and practice.

Originality/value

In this interview, Michael Rosemann points to directions of future development for the BPM community, particularly with respect to explorative BPM. Michael Rosemann also highlights the skillset explorative BPM researchers and professionals should have.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Roy Chan and Michael Rosemann

Enterprise Systems are comprehensive and complex applications that form the core business operating system for many companies worldwide and throughout most industries. The…

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Abstract

Enterprise Systems are comprehensive and complex applications that form the core business operating system for many companies worldwide and throughout most industries. The selection, implementation, use and continuous change of Enterprise Systems (ES) (e.g. mySAP.com) require a great amount of knowledge and experience. Due to the lack of in‐house ES knowledge and the high costs of engaging experienced implementation consultants, organizations realize the need to better leverage their knowledge resources. Managing this knowledge is increasingly important with the second wave of ES projects focusing E‐Business applications like Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Supply Chain Management (SCM). These new applications embrace an open‐integration strategy that will incorporate and support other vendors’ applications as part of its Internet‐based enterprise computing platform. This paper proposes a framework for managing knowledge in Enterprise Systems. The framework draws its strength from meta‐case studies and comprehensive literature analyses, which is consolidated into a three‐dimensional framework. The preliminary results show that the importance of value‐adding activities and innovation are elemental to knowledge management in the aspect of ES.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Monica Anastassiu, Flavia Maria Santoro, Jan Recker and Michael Rosemann

The purpose of this paper is to propose a method for identifying business process-relevant contextual information that is likely to impact on the process goal. The ORGANON…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a method for identifying business process-relevant contextual information that is likely to impact on the process goal. The ORGANON method describes a semi-structured procedural guide alongside with a set of criteria and a matrix for analyzing ontological transactions, which can be used to identify which context information can be considered relevant to a business process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors report on an evaluation of the ORGANON method through a case study conducted in an organization that works in the social security domain.

Findings

The results provide evidences of the feasibility of the method application in this scenario.

Originality/value

Our research contributes to the literature on business processes flexibility, specifically through a proposal for context identification that can be extended to current techniques for business process modeling and in turn forms the basis for existing approaches for making business processes more flexible. The work has implications for the strategic management of organizations, by suggesting a method that provides informational support to decision makers about when, where and why business processes need to be adapted.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Michael Rosemann

This second part of the paper summarizes typical pitfalls as they can be observed in larger process modeling projects.

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Abstract

Purpose

This second part of the paper summarizes typical pitfalls as they can be observed in larger process modeling projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The identified pitfalls have been derived from a series of focus groups and semi‐structured interviews with business process analysts and managers of process management and modeling projects.

Findings

The article continues the discussion of the first part. It covers issues related to tools and related requirements (7‐10), the practice of modeling (11‐16), the way we design to‐be models (17‐19), and how we deal with success of modeling and maintenance issues (19‐21). Potential pitfalls related to strategy and governance (1‐3) and the involved stakeholders (4‐6) were discussed in the first part of this paper.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a personal viewpoint, and does not report on the outcomes of a structured qualitative research project.

Practical implications

The provided list of intotal 22 pitfalls increases the awareness for the main challenges related to process modeling and helps to identify common mistakes.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the very few contributions in the area of challenges related to process modeling.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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