Search results

1 – 10 of 77
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yue Zhao, Jenny M.Y. Huen and Michael Prosser

Hong Kong has undergone extensive curriculum reform and shifted from a three-year to a four-year university system. With a nuanced look at the impact of the curriculum…

Abstract

Purpose

Hong Kong has undergone extensive curriculum reform and shifted from a three-year to a four-year university system. With a nuanced look at the impact of the curriculum reform, the purpose of the present study was to compare two concurrent cohorts by examining the extent to which the students in each cohort perceived their learning environment and learning outcomes differently and to what extent their perceptions differed.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 3,102 first-year students enrolled at a Hong Kong university responded to the student learning experience questionnaire (SLEQ). The perceived learning experiences between the two cohorts were tapped through several latent factors and validated through tests of measurement invariance. Latent mean differences were then compared. A multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis approach was used.

Findings

The findings suggested that measurement invariance of the scales of the SLEQ was established and that the two cohorts of students perceived largely similar learning experiences. The latent mean differences were statistically significant on the scales of feedback from teacher, clear goals and standards, personal integrity and ethics, intercultural competence, global perspective and civic commitment.

Practical implications

The results facilitate the understanding of perceived student learning experiences with evidence-based implications for enhancing student learning experiences and refining the four-year curriculum under the new curriculum reform conditions.

Originality/value

This is the first institution-wide study that compares student learning experiences of two concurrent cohorts under curriculum reform initiatives of Hong Kong. It provides a meaningful and pertinent example for educators and researchers worldwide to analyze the impact of curriculum reform from the perspective of students’ perceived learning experiences. Similar studies adopting rigorous approaches in the measurement of students’ perceived learning experiences are relatively rare in higher education. Such efforts are encouraged for accountability and quality improvement purposes.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Erika Martens and Michael Prosser

The evaluation and continuous improvement of the quality of teaching and learning in higher education is an issue of sustained concern. While most universities are…

Abstract

The evaluation and continuous improvement of the quality of teaching and learning in higher education is an issue of sustained concern. While most universities are implementing systems of quality assurance, there is substantial variation in the principles underlying these systems. La Trobe University has developed and implemented a university‐wide system of quality assurance that ensures that each subject is systematically reviewed and enhanced by those teaching in the subject. While it incorporates compulsory student evaluation of teaching of each subject the result of this student evaluation is not the focus of the quality assurance system. The focus is on ensuring that those teaching the subject, reflect on and make recommendations for further improvement of the subject. Outlines the quality assurance system, the principles on which it is based and describes and analyses the processes engaged in during its development.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Access and Exclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-185-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Françoise Giraud and Olivier Saulpic

The relationship between research and teaching – sometimes referred to as the research–teaching nexus – is an important issue in education literature. However, although it…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between research and teaching – sometimes referred to as the research–teaching nexus – is an important issue in education literature. However, although it is acknowledged that this question is specific to each discipline, it is rarely addressed in the management accounting (MA) literature. Outside MA, the literature focuses on the influence of research on teaching but rarely touches on the influence of teaching on research. This paper has two aims: to enhance the understanding of the research–teaching link in MA and to analyse the link from teaching into research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a reflexive analysis of a case in which the content of a management control course progressively changed over a period of 15 years. The authors structure their description of the case using Dewey’s concept of inquiry.

Findings

This paper first shows that designing the content of this course was a form of research and it produced knowledge. This analysis also suggests that the influence of research on teaching can take other forms than introducing research results or methods into teaching; designing teaching content is nurtured by not only scientific considerations but also pedagogical considerations and lecturers’ values; and linking research and teaching raises different issues dependent on the stance adopted by MA scholars in their research.

Research limitations/implications

The academic community should seriously consider that knowledge can be produced in a teaching context, through the design of a teaching content.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an inquiry process by documenting how course content is actually designed, which has not yet been done in the MA literature.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Abstract

Details

Access and Exclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-185-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Access and Exclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-185-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Clive Loveluck

In an article Reading for Managers, (Education & Training July/August 1974), Terry Farnsworth recommended an instant bibliography. He wrote:.. it is doubtful whether more…

Abstract

In an article Reading for Managers, (Education & Training July/August 1974), Terry Farnsworth recommended an instant bibliography. He wrote:.. it is doubtful whether more than 10 per cent of practising managers have ever read a book on management… His recommendations were of considerable merit, yet one wonders if they will perceptibly increase that proportion. Perhaps one should start at a different point.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 17 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Janine Pierce

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by government and nongovernment organizations to enable participants who are often from disadvantaged groups, to capture their lives, experiences, and issues through photos and associated written stories. Visual methods such as photovoice provide both opportunities and risks with ethical considerations and concerns that are both ethical in nature for those taking the photographs, and for those in the photographs. There are also associated ethical challenges for researchers to conform to ethical guidelines, while conveying stories that are in the public interest. Ascertaining why visual information should be considered in relation to ethics can be argued as important, as the receiver processing the visual information will process, perceive, and respond in a variety of ways, and possibly in different ways to what the sender aimed to convey. It was argued here that due to the strong ethical guidelines for photovoice projects, it is more of a deontological-based research approach. A key ethical concern associated with photovoice is that it is touted to participants as a vehicle to achieve social change, yet there is no guarantee that this change will occur, as ultimate power rests in the hands of decision makers. Photovoice ethical processes were discussed, with reflections by the author on ethical issues that have occurred in her own research, and suggestions to organizations on what to consider to ensure a photovoice project proceeds with ethical consideration to ensure an empowering experience as an influencer for social change.

Details

Visual Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-165-6

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Corbynism: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-372-0

1 – 10 of 77